Friday, April 7, 2017

TSA 2-Weeks in Review Mar 20th - April 2nd: 112 Loaded Firearms in Carry-on Bags over Last Two Weeks

Firearms

TSA discovered 136 firearms over the last two weeks in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 136 firearms discovered, 112 were loaded and 41 had a round chambered. All of the firearms pictured were discovered over the last two weeks. See a complete list below.

Knives
From left to right, these items were discovered in carry-on bags at: LGA, OAK, DEN, MDW, MYR, BNA, ABQ and ABQ. While knives are not allowed in carry-on bags, you may pack them in your checked luggage.


In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly in carry-on bags, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons, stun guns, small pocketknives and many other prohibited items too numerous to note.


TSA discovered 136 firearms over the last two weeks in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 136 firearms discovered, 112 were loaded and 41 had a round chambered.
You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline.


Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure. 

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $11,000. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions; that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates. 

If you haven’t read them yet, make sure you check out our year in review posts for 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016. And don’t forget to check out our top 10 most unusual finds of 2016 video! 

Follow @TSA on Twitter and Instagram!

Bob Burns - TSA Social Media Team 



13 comments:

Fix the TSA said...

Only one difficult to read time/date stamp this week, Bob? Disappointing. Looks like you managed not to cut off gun photos this week, though, so kudos for that.

Chip and Andy said...

So what happened TSA? Over a hundred comments on that one post, only one on this one in ten days? I seriously doubt it is from lack of interest from the reading public, why are you so reluctant to approve the comments in a timely manner?

RB said...

I just checked the TSA "Meet our Bloggers" link to see if TSA actually had any bloggers since none is being done here.

GSOLTSO said...

Chip and Andy sez - "So what happened TSA? Over a hundred comments on that one post, only one on this one in ten days? I seriously doubt it is from lack of interest from the reading public, why are you so reluctant to approve the comments in a timely manner?"

All comments have been cleared as of this morning. They are either posted, registered with the system as SPAM or were determined to not meet blog posting guidelines.

RB sez - "I just checked the TSA "Meet our Bloggers" link to see if TSA actually had any bloggers since none is being done here."

All of the people that participate at the blog, are part timers here. We all have other job responsibilities we have to take care of and do this in a limited capacity. I have been here, just have other things I have to do as well.

West
TSA Blog Team

RB said...

GSOLTSO said...
Chip and Andy sez - "So what happened TSA? Over a hundred comments on that one post, only one on this one in ten days? I seriously doubt it is from lack of interest from the reading public, why are you so reluctant to approve the comments in a timely manner?"

All comments have been cleared as of this morning. They are either posted, registered with the system as SPAM or were determined to not meet blog posting guidelines.

RB sez - "I just checked the TSA "Meet our Bloggers" link to see if TSA actually had any bloggers since none is being done here."

All of the people that participate at the blog, are part timers here. We all have other job responsibilities we have to take care of and do this in a limited capacity. I have been here, just have other things I have to do as well.

West
TSA Blog Team

April 17, 2017 at 3:45 PM

...............
How many TSA employees work on the blog?

RB said...

More chatter of ClearCare brand contact lens cleaners being prohibited by TSA screeners.

Is this a simple case where TSA cannot determine if an item is actually dangerous or not?

Are TSA screening methods so poor that harmless items are confused with real WEI?

And exactly where does TSA derive any authority to prohibit harmless items since the legislation only allows TSA to prohibit WEI?

If TSA can't determine if an item is harmless then I would say that leaves not option other than a vote of NO Confidence in TSA methods.

RB said...

Last weekly update:

FRIDAY, APRIL 7, 2017

TSA 2-Weeks in Review Mar 20th - April 2nd: 112 Loaded Firearms in Carry-on Bags over Last Two Weeks

.....

It's now Friday, April 21, 2017

Blogger Bob posted:

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2016

TSA Week in Review 10/28 - 11/6 - Flares, Guns, Black Powder, and More
Today’s report covers the last ten days as opposed to the usual seven. The Week in Review posts will now be posted on Mondays.

............

Just curious Bob, but when are you going to start doing what you said you would do?

I realize that TSA and its employees say a lot of things which are just not true but this is kinda blatant don't you think?


Oh, still waiting for the answer of how many people actually work on the TSA blog. Gonna claim SSI on this too?

Doober said...

RB wrote: "Is this a simple case where TSA cannot determine if an item is actually dangerous or not?"

TSA won't allow one to carry a circular thread cutter often used by those who do needle work, but they do allow crochet hooks, straight and circular knitting needles and scissors less than 4" long from fulcrum.

If that's not being unable to determine if an item is dangerous or not, I don't know what is.

They also don't allow collapsible trekking poles on board (unless one uses those poles as mobility devices when approaching the checkpoint) but does allow collapsible tripods. Tell me, please, how that makes any sense.

screen shot/DHS IG statement

Boldly said...

RB said...
More chatter of ClearCare brand contact lens cleaners being prohibited by TSA screeners.

Is this a simple case where TSA cannot determine if an item is actually dangerous or not?

Are TSA screening methods so poor that harmless items are confused with real WEI?

And exactly where does TSA derive any authority to prohibit harmless items since the legislation only allows TSA to prohibit WEI?

If TSA can't determine if an item is harmless then I would say that leaves not option other than a vote of NO Confidence in TSA methods.

I'm not sure what "clearCare Brand" is, but it has always been the policy that peroxide based eye solutions aren't allowed. Its nothing new. There is no way to tell if it is 1% peroxide or 100% without going to a lab. I'm sure you would think we could look at the label, lord knows bad guys would never put something in a container that wasn't on the label.. we can trust labels. Another common sense answer. I'm surprised you even needed to ask...no, I'm really not.

RB said...

Boldly said...
RB said...
More chatter of ClearCare brand contact lens cleaners being prohibited by TSA screeners.

Is this a simple case where TSA cannot determine if an item is actually dangerous or not?

Are TSA screening methods so poor that harmless items are confused with real WEI?

And exactly where does TSA derive any authority to prohibit harmless items since the legislation only allows TSA to prohibit WEI?

If TSA can't determine if an item is harmless then I would say that leaves not option other than a vote of NO Confidence in TSA methods.

.................

I'm not sure what "clearCare Brand" is, but it has always been the policy that peroxide based eye solutions aren't allowed. Its nothing new. There is no way to tell if it is 1% peroxide or 100% without going to a lab. I'm sure you would think we could look at the label, lord knows bad guys would never put something in a container that wasn't on the label.. we can trust labels. Another common sense answer. I'm surprised you even needed to ask...no, I'm really not.

April 23, 2017 at 11:41 AM
.................

Not very hard to find out what ClearCare is Boldy.

https://www.clearcaresolution.com/?utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc

I see your use of we that identifies you as one of TSA's finest. Thought you had stated before that you had no association with TSA? Did you lie?

If TSA can't weed out harmless medical items from truly dangerous things then I don't think TSA is worth much. Certainly not $8,000,000,000.00 tax dollars each year.

Boldly said...

Not very hard to find out what ClearCare is Boldy.
your assuming I care, my point was not brand specific

https://www.clearcaresolution.com/?utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc

I see your use of we that identifies you as one of TSA's finest. Thought you had stated before that you had no association with TSA? Did you lie? never heard of "we" as a descriptor of people in general?

If TSA can't weed out harmless medical items from truly dangerous things then I don't think TSA is worth much. Certainly not $8,000,000,000.00 tax dollars each year.
do you have a method of determining the amount of peroxide in a liquid at a checkpoint? Do you know anyone who does? Neither TSA nor anyone else have developed such a test kit. Could be worth a lot of money if you could do it.

RB said...

Boldly said...
Not very hard to find out what ClearCare is Boldy.
your assuming I care, my point was not brand specific

https://www.clearcaresolution.com/?utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc

I see your use of we that identifies you as one of TSA's finest. Thought you had stated before that you had no association with TSA? Did you lie? never heard of "we" as a descriptor of people in general?

If TSA can't weed out harmless medical items from truly dangerous things then I don't think TSA is worth much. Certainly not $8,000,000,000.00 tax dollars each year.
do you have a method of determining the amount of peroxide in a liquid at a checkpoint? Do you know anyone who does? Neither TSA nor anyone else have developed such a test kit. Could be worth a lot of money if you could do it.

April 25, 2017 at 4:06 PM
...................
Boldy, you said you didn't know what Clear Care was. So I offered a bit of education. I would think as a TSA screener you would want to know details such as this.

The point I am making is that TSA cannot determine if something is dangerous or not. The CFR that regulates TSA requires only prohibiting WEI material. In order to do that requires that TSA being able to distinguish between WEI and non-WEI materials. In other words, words that even you can understand, TSA isn't going the job the CFR's demand. Clear Care is not WEI, it's also an exempted medical liquid and must be allowed through the checkpoint.

Chip and Andy said...

Boldy fails at basic chemistry by saying "...There is no way to tell if it is 1% peroxide or 100% without going to a lab. "

Your basic contact lens solution is going to be between 2% and 4% peroxide.

Your basic bottle of peroxide like you would keep in your medicine cabinet is going to be between 5% and 10% peroxide.

In both cases it is printed right on the label, but you have made the claim that a terrorist could use that bit of knowledge to trick the TSA Screeners into thinking something dangerous is something safe.

Except it doesn't work that way.

A solution with a high enough peroxide content to be dangerous is also going to be high enough eat away any of the plastic bottles that would make it look like contact lens solution. So unless the terrorist was standing right there in the security line pouring the solution from a glass container into the contact lens container no one is smuggling dangerous levels of peroxide in a contact lens solution bottle.

And then to the ability to tell with or without a lab....

Typical household use materials are less than 10% solution, usually clear and usually odorless except for those with good noses.

Typical chemical lab quality materials are around 30% solution, usually blueish in color, and have an odor that even the dead can detect.

Anything past about 50% solution has to be stored under pressure or in very specialized containers because the peroxide starts to heat the water, will eventually generate steam, and that will bring the peroxide to its reactive temperature and then you have a pretty big boom.

This is the part where you claim that this is the goal of the terrorist and why peroxide is bad. An error which you compound by claiming there is no way absent a lab to determine the solution level contained within. Wrong on both counts. Any level of peroxide solution high enough to be dangerous to an aircraft is high enough to be dangerous in the security check line. And in the security check line is where any 'peroxide bomb' would detonate because peroxide is so unstable at solutions rich enough to be dangerous.

And while you try and find a way to spin this back as somehow being the fault of the passenger and not a flaw in the security theater that is the TSA..... Stronger levels of peroxide are in most teeth whitening toothpastes. How could contact lens solution be so dangerous to an aircraft but not toothpaste when they share the same 'dangerous' ingredient?