Friday, March 17, 2017

TSA Week in Review Mar 6th - 12th: 73 Firearms Discovered in Carry-on Bags (66 Loaded)

Firearms
TSA discovered 73 firearms last week in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 73 firearms discovered, 66were loaded and 27 had a round chambered. All of the firearms pictured were discovered last week. See a complete list below.
Sharp Items
Clockwise from the top: Sword Cane - PHX, Throwing Stars - IAH, Push Dagger - BOI, Knife - ROC
In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly in carry-on bags, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons, stun guns, small pocketknives and many other prohibited items too numerous to note.

TSA discovered 73 firearms last week in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 73 firearms discovered, 66were loaded and 27 had a round chambered.

You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline.

You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms.

Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $11,000. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions; that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates.

If you haven’t read them yet, make sure you check out our year in review posts for
2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016. And don’t forget to check out our top 10 most unusual finds of 2016 video!

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Bob Burns
TSA Social Media Team




































































































10 comments:

SilentS said...

I'm sure you've gotten this question before but,
when you list the number of firearms with rounds chambered, does that include revolvers?
If so, I think it would be helpful to break that down into revolvers and other firearms where the bullet is fully chambered.

Keep up the good work!

RB said...

RB said...
"Medication: One of the more popular questions we get from travelers is: “Can I travel with my medication?” The answer is yes, with some qualifiers."

And the "qualifiers" are?

Can a person travel with nitroglycerin pills in their carry-on? The TSA "Can I Bring" tool certainly does not answer that question.

nitroglycerin pills

"TSA allows larger amounts of medically necessary liquids, gels, and aerosols in reasonable quantities for your trip, but you must declare them to security officers at the checkpoint for inspection."


The response given has no relation to the question, "Can a person travel with nitroglycerin pills in their carry-on." Anyone who has dealt with nitroglycerin pills know they are tiny, keep in a very small glass vial, and certainly not a hazard to the safe operation of the aircraft.

Why is it so hard for TSA to answer a simple, straight forward question with a clear responsive answer?

March 9, 2017 at 10:22 AM
............
Going on two weeks without a response so let us flesh this question out just a bit. When checking with the TSA "Can I Bring" tool for other types of pills the answers are more to the point. Examples:

Tylenol (pill) ((Cap T is mine, TSA has this wrong too))

Check or Carry-on
You may transport this item in carry-on or checked baggage. For items you wish to carry on, you should check with the airline to ensure that the item will fit in the overhead bin or underneath the seat of the airplane.
.........

aspirin

Check or Carry-on
You may transport this item in carry-on or checked baggage. For items you wish to carry on, you should check with the airline to ensure that the item will fit in the overhead bin or underneath the seat of the airplane.
............

ibuprofen (tablets)

Check or Carry-on
You may transport this item in carry-on or checked baggage. For items you wish to carry on, you should check with the airline to ensure that the item will fit in the overhead bin or underneath the seat of the airplane.

So the questions for these medicines are answered clearly. You can transport this item in carry-on or checked baggage.

Yet when the question is nitroglycerin pills the answer that TSA gives doesn't even address the question, instead goes off on some tangent that was not asked. Any claims by the TSA Blog Team that this question has been answered is just a flat out lie. The question has not been answered, the TSA "Can I Bring" tool gives less than helpful information, and our taxpayer paid public employees refuse to step up and address what is clearly a problem.

This is the low quality TSA that we get and is one of the many reasons that the public has no respect for TSA and its employees.

I am more than willing to discuss why TSA cannot provide a useful answer to this old question but just ignoring the issue does TSA no good.

GSOLTSO said...

RB sez - snip "Can a person travel with nitroglycerin pills in their carry-on? The TSA "Can I Bring" tool certainly does not answer that question." snip

This is not correct. The part you neglect to mention, is the green/red bar that comes up with the answers. Green means it is able to go, red means it is not able to go.

If you visit the link below, you will see that nitro pills are given the green flag for both checked, and carry on bags with a green banner across the top.

https://apps.tsa.dhs.gov/mytsa/cib_results.aspx?search=nitro

If you visit the link below, you will see that explosives are not permitted on planes at all, with a red banner across the top.

https://apps.tsa.dhs.gov/mytsa/cib_results.aspx?search=explosives

And, finally, you can get either or results, which give you a green banner for whichever section of the airplane it is allowed in. This is the case for firearms, which get the green banner for checked baggage only if you see the link below.

https://apps.tsa.dhs.gov/mytsa/cib_results.aspx?search=firearms

Just in case someone wants to know if there are items that are actually allowed in the carry on, but not checked baggage, please visit the link below and see the green banner for matches.

https://apps.tsa.dhs.gov/mytsa/cib_results.aspx?search=matches

To state that the TSA Blog Team has not repeatedly given you an answer about nitro pills and medications, is simply not true.

As indicated in the above links, and the numerous links posted previously, nitro pills, patches, and other forms of medicinal nitro are allowed to be carried on, or to be transported in checked baggage.

West
TSA Blog Team

RB said...

GSOLTSO said.........

......snipped......
If you visit the link below, you will see that nitro pills are given the green flag for both checked, and carry on bags with a green banner across the top.

West
TSA Blog Team

March 21, 2017 at 1:55 PM

Can you point to the location where the page border you describe is defined? If not then the words used are the only points that matter and the question goes unanswered as the discussion is about larger quantities of LGA's not tiny nitroglycerin pills and as shown TSA does use positive responses for other pills.

TSA has, seemingly with purpose, left the decision to allow or not allow these pills to the least qualified person there is, a TSA screener.

john barker said...

Wow comments are being posted.

@RB, medication is allowed according to the website, and nitroglycerin pills are for people with heart conditions so I would bet they are allowed. Your hatred towards TSA is well known but just leave it be and try to bring up real issues.

Wintermute said...

Also, seems to be noncompliant with the ADA if the text doesn't match the color coding, even if this is described somewhere.

RB said...

john barker said...
Wow comments are being posted.

@RB, medication is allowed according to the website, and nitroglycerin pills are for people with heart conditions so I would bet they are allowed. Your hatred towards TSA is well known but just leave it be and try to bring up real issues.

March 23, 2017 at 12:39 AM
...........
The TSA "Can I Bring" website does not say that nitroglycerin pills are allowed. The answer given is not responsive. I gave examples of how the question is answered for other common pills and in each case a clear answer is provided. That simply is not the case for nitroglycerin pills.

It has been reported that TSA screeners have in fact confiscated nitroglycerin pills. I don't know if it was a one off or what but once is too often when the medicine in question is a life saving medicine and some TSA screener thinks they know better than a persons doctor. Or perhaps that TSA screener (and others possibly) think nitroglycerin pills present some kind of risk which is just idiotic. There is no means possible to weaponize nitroglycerin pills.

If TSA screeners confiscating life saving medicines isn't a "real issue" then I would be interested in what you think a "real issue" is, john barker.

RB said...

West, still waiting for the link to where the page borders are defined on "Can I Bring" pages.

Boldly said...

john barker said...
Wow comments are being posted.

@RB, medication is allowed according to the website, and nitroglycerin pills are for people with heart conditions so I would bet they are allowed. Your hatred towards TSA is well known but just leave it be and try to bring up real issues.
Clearly some posters are more concerned about their agenda than getting and listening to responses. This issue (nitro pills) has been addressed and answered several times. Problem is, he isn't getting the answer that fits his agenda. More evidence of this is his continuous use of " confiscate." we know that is in accurate as does the poster, yet to further his hate filled agenda, he continues to use it. Just kind of discredits any claims that his questions aren't addressed, they are he just doesn't like the answer.

john barker said...

@RB,
My dad has never had a problem when we travel. He takes his pills everywhere we go.
For example a real issue would be the Real ID requirements, my state is one of those affected. I have never flown internationally and have never had the need for a passport. Why am I required to get one?
Another example would be Why have different set of procedures for certain groups of people? Shouldn't everyone be treated with the same procedures. I just received their new patdown, I was told everyone receives the same patdown. Which in my opinion is good but I didn't like the new way I was searched.
I am not all pro TSA, but you can't take it out on the the people that are there to follow the procedures placed by the people in Washington D.C.
TSA has its pros and cons whether you believe in what they do but don't just ignore what they do.
Being biased is not helping, fixing issues takes input both positive and negative.
I've had good and bad experiences but the good outweigh the bad. Screeners have good days and bad days, remember they're human too. They do the same repetitive job over and over day in day out. I know we expect higher standards from them, after all they are federal employees that work in the public's view.
Don't take it on them, take it out on TSA management. TSA management make up the rules and procedures and I would like to assume they have never worked with the screeners to see what goes on.