Tuesday, March 7, 2017

TSA Week in Review Feb 27th - Mar 5th - Two Live Smoke Grenades, Practice Grenade, and 3 Ground Burst Simulators Discovered in Checked Bag at Palm Springs

Firearms
TSA discovered 58 firearms last week in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 58 firearms discovered, 54 were loaded and 21 had a round chambered. All of the firearms pictured were discovered last week. See a complete list below.
Two Live Smoke Grenades, Practice Grenade, and 3 Ground Burst Simulators
A checked bag containing an ammunition box with the following was discovered at Palm Springs (PSP) : Three live ground burst simulators, Two live M83 smoke grenades and one inert practice grenade.
Stun Cane
Another stun cane (one was found at OGG last week) was discovered in the carry-on property of a Kahului (OGG) traveler. All stun devices are prohibited in carry-on bags. Concealed stun devices can lead to fines and arrest.
knives
Left - Right, these knives were discovered in carry-on bags at IAH, IAH, IAD, ORD and PVD. All knives no matter how small are prohibited from being packed in carry-on bags. However, they may be packed in checked baggage.
In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly in carry-on bags, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons, stun guns, small pocket knives and many other prohibited items too numerous to note. 

TSA discovered 58 firearms last week in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 58 firearms discovered, 54 were loaded and 21 had a round chambered.
You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline.

You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms. 

Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $11,000. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions; that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates.  



If you haven’t read them yet, make sure you check out our year in review posts for 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016. And don’t forget to check out our top 10 most unusual finds of 2016 video!

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Bob Burns - TSA Social Media Team

10 comments:

Brian Klawitter said...

Bob, why is a handgun listed as loaded or chambered?
Besides one second, what's the difference?

Jimk42 said...

It is about time that the passengers trying to carry these items on board should be arrested. This would enforce the thinking of these passengers. I don't buy the thought that they forgot the items were in their bags. They inconvenience the other passengers.

Jimk42 said...

It is about time that anyone carrying a concealed weapon or outlawed item be arrested and have the problem investigated as to why the person tried to carry a prohibited item on board. TSA would cut down the occurrences of this problem after these people are inconvenienced for the attempt to carry a prohibited item on board.

RB said...

How is it that TSA screeners can't handle the "cognitive strain" of deciding which of the former 5 types pat down was correct for the situation which has resulted in one very invasive pat down. Thought TSA screeners were highly trained. Apparently no so much, eh!

RB said...

How about the report that TSA is keeping documents from oversight by Congressional Oversight Committee based on unwritten rules? Seems like West mentioned unwritten rules in one of his missives. Have to be concerned about un-american activities by employees of the TSA. I think there's a term for government employees who refuse to comply with the law.

c180tom said...

Quoting the Atlanta newspaper in 2016:"Starting June 1, anyone who forgets they have a gun in their carry-on luggage will be looking at up to a year in jail and a $100,000 fine if the firearm is caught at the security check point at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport."
Were there prosecutions, fines or jail time for the three (of 58 noted above) firearms found in carry-on at ATL (on 2-28-17, 3-01 and 3-02)? This would seem to be a better deterrent than increasing pat-downs. I note that Israel security (including outbound from US) do not use pat-downs, but more effective profiling.
I would rather be profiled that patted, but them I'm seldom politically correct.

RB said...

Two new articles yet the TSA Blog Team cannot find the time to post comments on this older post.

Good job TSA!

Mary Englund said...

does anyone know if I can bring knitting needles or a crochet hook on board Korean Airlines to make a hat or scarf during the long flight to Korea. The guy at Korean airlines didn't know. I don't think he knew what knitting needles or a crochet hook was. ???

RB said...

Mary Englund said...
does anyone know if I can bring knitting needles or a crochet hook on board Korean Airlines to make a hat or scarf during the long flight to Korea. The guy at Korean airlines didn't know. I don't think he knew what knitting needles or a crochet hook was. ???


March 15, 2017 at 1:11 PM

...................

Good luck on getting an answer here.

GSOLTSO said...

RB sez - "Good job TSA!"

Thanks!

Mary Englund sez - "does anyone know if I can bring knitting needles or a crochet hook on board Korean Airlines"

TSA does not prohibit knitting needles or crochet hooks. Korean Air may have individual policies that are contrary to that, but TSA does not prohibit either item on domestic or international departures.

West
TSA Blog Team