Tuesday, February 7, 2017

TSA Week in Review Jan 30th - Feb 5th

Firearms
TSA discovered 56 firearms last week in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 56 firearms discovered, 51 were loaded and 19 had a round chambered. All of the firearms pictured were discovered last week. See a complete list below.
Knives
Clockwise from the top, these knives were discovered in carry-on bags at IAH, HNL, BUR, ATL and CHS.

In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly in carry-on bags, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons, stun guns, small pocketknives and many other prohibited items too numerous to note. 

When packed properly, ammunition can be transported in your checked baggage, but it is never permissible to pack ammo in your carry-on bag. You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline.

You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms.

Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure. 

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $11,000. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions; that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items. 

*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates. 


If you haven’t read them yet, make sure you check out our year in review posts for 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016. And don’t forget to check out our top 10 most unusual finds of 2016 video! 


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Bob Burns 
TSA Social Media Team

20 comments:

Doober said...

http://www.seattletimes.com/nation-world/rocker-in-airport-bust-says-he-often-flew-with-gun/

"Rock guitarist Rick Derringer told a federal air marshal that he had kept his gun with him on commercial airline flights 30 to 50 times a year, and was only detained last month at Atlanta’s airport near the end of a trip from Mexico, authorities said."

Chip and Andy said...

Aaaaannnnddd...... still no terrorists. Or any bad guys really, since so many of your cheerleaders remind me that you aren't looking for terrorists.

RB said...

Why wasn't this story posted in the weekly update?

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/02/13/tsa-workers-helped-puerto-rico-based-ring-smuggle-100m-cocaine-prosecutors-say.html

"Prosecutors in Puerto Rico have smashed a ring of current and former U.S. Transportation Security Administration workers that allegedly smuggled 20 tons of cocaine worth as much as $100 million into the U.S. over more than a decade."

Again, insider threats pose a larger security threat than passengers yet TSA does nothing to mitigate the threat. All airport workers should be screened each and every time they enter the security areas of an airport. No different that passengers.

Yes4TSA said...

How do you know these weren't bad guys? Am I missing the part where their names and criminal history are attached with the firearm description?

Boldly said...

Chip and Andy said...
Aaaaannnnddd...... still no terrorists. Or any bad guys really, since so many of your cheerleaders remind me that you aren't looking for terrorists

its only said because it's true. Annnnnnnd still no terror attacks on an American based flight. Also true.

Boldly said...

Yes4TSA said...
How do you know these weren't bad guys? Am I missing the part where their names and criminal history are attached with the firearm description?

absolutely correct. As I have said many times, had screeners stopped the box cutters on 9-11, 3000+ lives would have been saved and not one person would have known that the largest terror attack in US history was prevented. It is entirely possible that another large scale or even several large scale attacks have been prevented by TSA. There is no way we will ever know. But we do know for a fact, there has not been a single terror attack on an American based flight since the inception of TSA. That is undeniable.

Chip and Andy said...

"...It is entirely possible that another large scale or even several large scale attacks have been prevented by TSA."

Could be.

But all the evidence to date about, from, and for the TSA does not support that claim. People who have crossed whatever 'line' and have decided to go kill a bunch of people on, or around, or with, an aircraft aren't likely to just say 'shucks' and go home after the TSA voluntarily surrenders their binary explosives that are secretly mixed in bottles of gatorade and tubes of toothpaste.

Unless, of course, you are the type that believes a no-guns-allowed sign is the only thing keeping all the banks from being robbed. Then by all means the TSA is the most awesome agency full of awesome ever!

Yes4TSA said...

So don't you think it'd possible thata person that was stopped with a firearm had a plan to unload said fire arm on the plan? But because the firearm was discovered the person couldn't do what he had planned and said dang it. And when questioned by police I don't think he would say " well my plan was to... "

Chip and Andy said...

Yes4TSA said...
So don't you think it'd possible thata person that was stopped with a firearm had a plan to unload said fire arm on the plan?

Possible?

Certainly it's possible.

It is equally possible that the person who planned on, how did you put it.... "unload said firearm on the plane" would realize that there are just as many victims available in the security line so why wait?

Why do so many people track down along the idea that you can only cause damage once you are on the aircraft? There are as many or more victims available in the security lines and if you are at terrorist the security line is even more terrorizing because just anyone could get in line so how do you know the guy behind you hasn't already started the timer on his bomb?

Sparkleman said...

Can I wear my hearing aids when I go through Security?

Mike Toreno said...

"So don't you think it'd possible thata person that was stopped with a firearm had a plan to unload said fire arm on the plan?"

No, it's totally impossible. The TSA misses 95% of firearms, so there is zero chance that they would stop a planned terrorist attack using a firearm, and there is zero chance that anyone planning an attack would be deterred.

Mark Thom said...

My bag showed up on the carousel in Atlanta with a firearm declared inside. Quite a great security system you have TSA. I am a retired law officer and that was totally unacceptable. Anyone could have grabbed that bag. In the return flight I was an early check in at Atlanta by over 2 hrs and my bag never made it to my destination. What kind of people do you hire in Atlanta? Your all talk about security but it appears you are weak on implementation. Contact me and I will be glad to give you as much detail you need to cut more of your dead wood in Atlanta

Mark Thom said...

TSA lost my bag with my handgun in it. Flight from Atlanta to Philadelphia. Lost in Atlanta. I will be making a formal complaint This is unacceptable.

Yes4TSA said...

If you actually read articles about the testing in 2014, you would see that it wasn't all fire arms. So your theory is debunked. And also using your logic there would be a 5% chance. Not zero.

Yes4TSA said...

I suggest talking to the airlines about their protocol on returning bags with firearms in it. Tsa is not responsible for baggage after the screening process. Your airline and the airports are.

Boldly said...

Mark Thom said...
My bag showed up on the carousel in Atlanta with a firearm declared inside. Quite a great security system you have TSA. I am a retired law officer and that was totally unacceptable. Anyone could have grabbed that bag. In the return flight I was an early check in at Atlanta by over 2 hrs and my bag never made it to my destination. What kind of people do you hire in Atlanta? Your all talk about security but it appears you are weak on implementation. Contact me and I will be glad to give you as much detail you need to cut more of your dead wood in Atlanta

I fail to see how this is a TSA issue. You followed procedures and declared your weapon to the airlines. Perfect. TSA screened your bag. It may or may not have been opened, you didn't specify but either way it was ok'ed by TSA. (still everything is perfect) your bag made it to its destination and placed on a carousal for you to retrieve.

Now as I'm reading this, you flew out of Atlanta, and your bag was on the Atlanta carousal. meaning it never got on your flight...if that is correct, your complaint is with the airline, not TSA. TSA has nothing to do with bags going outbound to the baggage claim carousal. I think your looking for fault in the wrong place, go figure.

Boldly said...

Mark Thom said...
TSA lost my bag with my handgun in it. Flight from Atlanta to Philadelphia. Lost in Atlanta. I will be making a formal complaint This is unacceptable

I would love to hear how TSA and not the airline lost your bag.

Chip and Andy said...

Boldly said... "Mark Thom said...
TSA lost my bag with my handgun in it. Flight from Atlanta to Philadelphia. Lost in Atlanta. I will be making a formal complaint This is unacceptable"

I would love to hear how TSA and not the airline lost your bag.

Oooh! I know the answer to this one!

It is the TSA that inspects the bags between check-in and aircraft. Check-in places the bag onto the conveyor, Baggage Handlers put the bags onto the carts and load the aircraft. It is the TSA who inspects the bags, opens them, if you are lucky they leave you that really bad copy of the silly letter telling you they opened your bag. (even without the letter you know they peeked because your bag arrives without the tsa approved locks you started with)

It could have been the airlines, bags with firearms are usually labeled specifically and therefore pretty easy to spot. But since all of the areas the bags move through are under airport surveillance, except the tsa inspection areas, the odds and opportunities line up in such a way that "TSA" is the best answer to any question that ends with lost or missing items from travelers baggage.

Boldly said...

Chip and Andy said...
Oooh! I know the answer to this one!

It is the TSA that inspects the bags between check-in and aircraft. TSA sometimes checks them between checking and the baggage handlers Check-in places the bag onto the conveyor, Baggage Handlers put the bags onto the carts and load the aircraft. It is the TSA who inspects the bags, opens them, if you are lucky they leave you that really bad copy of the silly letter telling you they opened your bag. (even without the letter you know they peeked because your bag arrives without the tsa approved locks you started with)

It could have been the airlines, bags with firearms are usually labeled specifically and therefore pretty easy to spot. actually, there is no identifying information placed outside of the bag to indicate it has a firearm. At least the dozens of times I have traveled with a fire arm, I have never seen such a thing. The declaration goes inside the bag. But since all of the areas the bags move through are under airport surveillance, except the tsa inspection areas absolutely false. Every table the TSA uses has a camera directly above it to capture the entire process. the odds and opportunities line up in such a way that "TSA" is the best answer to any question that ends with lost or missing items from travelers baggage. the reality is, TSA has video cameras at every location where a bag would be opened or even come in contact with TSA. The entire belt lines are generally covered by video including the search tables in checked baggage locations. But remember, the claim is a bag was lost by TSA not an item stolen by TSA. TSA pulls the bag off of a roller, searches it and places it back on a roller. Hard to loose a bag doing that. The airlines put a bag on one a many carts in the baggage area, it could sit for hours unattended depending on layovers, then go onto any number of carts to be transported to another plane. None of which is under video surveillance. The odds that TSA lost someone's bag is miniscule at the very most, impossible is much more likely.

Chip and Andy said...

Boldy said "... Every table the TSA uses has a camera directly above it to capture the entire process."

True.

But that camera is controlled by the TSA, not the airline or airport authority. And the TSA has a pretty poor record of making video available when it might make the TSA look like they are wrong.

This one is even better.... "The airlines put a bag on one a many carts in the baggage area, it could sit for hours unattended depending on layovers, then go onto any number of carts to be transported to another plane. None of which is under video surveillance. "

So the TSA spends how much time and effort screening passengers and searching bags but then the bags sit for hours unattended and unmonitored? Either you are securing aviation or you aren't, security is a binary yes or no thing, you don't scan something to make it 'sterile' and then leave the scanned thing unattended and try and claim you are making, and then keeping, a place 'sterile.'

Isn't there a section in the TSA employee handbook that covers this kind of stuff? Did you skip class that day?