Wednesday, February 22, 2017

TSA Week in Review Feb 13th - 19th

Firearms
TSA discovered 61 firearms last week in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 61 firearms discovered, 54 were loaded and 21 had a round chambered. All of the firearms pictured were discovered last week. See a complete list below.
Concealed Torch in Pipe
A metallic pipe with capped ends (resembling a pipe bomb) was discovered under the lining of a checked bag zip tied to the handle mechanism. The pipe was concealing a butane torch. The traveler admitted he was attempting to sneak the torch past security. This incident occurred at Reno (RNO).
Sharp Items
Left to right, these items were discovered at BUR, IAH, MDT and OAK
In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly in carry-on bags, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons, stun guns, small pocketknives and many other prohibited items too numerous to note. 

When packed properly, ammunition can be transported in your checked baggage, but it is never permissible to pack ammo in your carry-on bag. 

TSA discovered 61 firearms last week in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 61 firearms discovered, 54 were loaded and 21 had a round chambered.You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline. 

You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms. 

Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure. 

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $11,000. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions; that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items. 

*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates. 

If you haven’t read them yet, make sure you check out our year in review posts for 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016. And don’t forget to check out our top 10 most unusual finds of 2016 video!


Bob Burns
TSA Social Media Team

18 comments:

RB said...

No mention of the 11 travelers who went through a TSA checkpoint at JFK with no screening?

Maybe because TSA ddoesn't think the breach was harmful to security!

"The TSA said it was “confident” the incident represented “no threat to the aviation transportation system.”"

Why are we spending $8,000,000,000.00 on TSA each year if people not being screened represent no threat?

Don Cochron said...

Thanks for the information. wonder what the passenger with the 13th Century battle ax

Wintermute said...

"The TSA said it was “confident” the incident represented “no threat to the aviation transportation system.”

Why were these 11 not a threat, but everyone else is? Seems to be an admission that TSA is nothing more than theatre.

RB said...

Wintermute said...
"The TSA said it was “confident” the incident represented “no threat to the aviation transportation system.”

Why were these 11 not a threat, but everyone else is? Seems to be an admission that TSA is nothing more than theatre.

February 26, 2017 at 11:25 AM
.........................
Exactly, TSA stated that not screening these people presented no threat because TSA uses "Layers" for security, layers that are seen and unseen. A clear admission that all of the TSA Security Theater is just there for show. TSA is wasting Billions of tax dollars each year that TSA itself says isn't needed to ensure security.

I want my money back!

Chip and Andy said...

"... The pipe was concealing a butane torch. "

Thank heavens you stopped that torch! We can't have passengers soldering something mid-flight, there could be absolute panic seeing a naked circuit board!

Oh, and remember the JFK 11!

They aren't (weren't) a threat, but the rest of us are!

Yes4TSA said...

Or you know, quickly and easily light a object going 500mph 30,000 feet above the ground surrounded by gasoline, on fire.

Chip and Andy said...

"...Or you know, quickly and easily light a object going 500mph 30,000 feet above the ground surrounded by gasoline, on fire."

Which would accomplish what, exactly?

First, fire extinguishers are standard equipment in all aircraft.

Second, if a passenger saw someone trying to light something on fire they are not going to just sit there and watch. You might do that but few other would. They are going to start to make a commotion. Which would attract the attention of flight crew and passengers alike. The flight crew would be hard pressed to stop the other passengers from beating the crap out of the one trying to start the fire.

End result.... a bit of a foul odor from whatever was set afire and then extinguished.

So, again, what is the danger to the passengers or aircraft?

Yes4TSA said...

Ummmm only the fact that the airplane could explode if caught on fire. It wouldn't be hard to go to the bathroom and catch that on fire where no one could stop you. Call me crazy, I don't want anyone to be able to light a row of seats on fire in 10 seconds with a torch; but hey that's just me I guess.

Chip and Andy said...

Yes4TSA said..."...I don't want anyone to be able to light a row of seats on fire in 10 seconds "

You don't know much about the materials used in Aircraft construction, do you?

You can't light a bathroom on fire because since they quit smoking on aircraft there is actual an extra smoke detector installed in each in all but the oldest equipment.

You can't light a row of seats on fire and you certainly couldn't do it in ten seconds. Every single bit of textile you see in the cabin is made, or treated with chemicals, to resist being set on fire. And I think I already mentioned the prodigious amount of fire extinguishing equipment installed and available in the cabin.

And the bits that might go boom when set on fire are pretty far away from the parts of the plane where the people are. And just about every one of those things that might go boom when set ablaze have lots of systems around them to prevent that from happening.

Long story short, that butane torch would hurt like hell if turned on you as a weapon. But you couldn't hurt more than one, maybe two people, with it as a weapon. You can't do anything more than some cosmetic damage to the aircraft with it as a terrorist device. And even if you did manage to actually ignite something sufficiently large on fire, the crew would have the fire out in almost no time and the pilot could cycle the air pretty quickly to clear the smoke. The end result would be a foul odor and a long-line at the refund counter when the plane landed.

Boldly said...

Chip and Andy said...
Yes4TSA said..."...I don't want anyone to be able to light a row of seats on fire in 10 seconds "

You don't know much about the materials used in Aircraft construction, do you?

You can't light a bathroom on fire because since they quit smoking on aircraft there is actual an extra smoke detector installed in each in all but the oldest equipment.

You can't light a row of seats on fire and you certainly couldn't do it in ten seconds. Every single bit of textile you see in the cabin is made, or treated with chemicals, to resist being set on fire. And I think I already mentioned the prodigious amount of fire extinguishing equipment installed and available in the cabin.

And the bits that might go boom when set on fire are pretty far away from the parts of the plane where the people are. And just about every one of those things that might go boom when set ablaze have lots of systems around them to prevent that from happening.

Long story short, that butane torch would hurt like hell if turned on you as a weapon. But you couldn't hurt more than one, maybe two people, with it as a weapon. You can't do anything more than some cosmetic damage to the aircraft with it as a terrorist device. And even if you did manage to actually ignite something sufficiently large on fire, the crew would have the fire out in almost no time and the pilot could cycle the air pretty quickly to clear the smoke. The end result would be a foul odor and a long-line at the refund counter when the plane landed.


its awesome that you know every possible scenario that could possibly happen as well as how every passenger would react. If TSA would just call you, everything would be so much easier. On the other hand...what if you are wrong. What if there is a scenario that you haven't thought of but Mr Badguy has?
Seems there are 2 choices...Assume Chip and Andy know every scenario therefore every flight is safe regardless of what a passenger brings
OR
Play it safe and protect the passengers from the unknown...

I think most would prefer to play it safe. After all, a torch is not going to be needed on a plane. I'm not sure everyone is a trusting of everybody as you are.



Chip and Andy said...

Boldy laughably failed in his argument by saying "...its awesome that you know every possible scenario that could possibly happen "

Where did I say anything of the sort?

I am merely pointing out that a butane torch is a pretty useless tool when it comes to terrorism against an aircraft.

And as for the need of it in flight, why do you and so many other TSA Cheerleaders take this attitude that the aircraft is some sort of sacrosanct vessel that must remain pristine at all time and anything unneeded in the cabin should be barred. You don't need your fishing rod in your car but it is going to be really hard to go fishing if you can't get your tackle from your home to your fishing hole. That passenger doesn't need his butane torch in flight but it just might be possible he needs it at the place the plane is landing.

Boldly said...

Chip and Andy said...
Boldy laughably failed in his argument by saying "...its awesome that you know every possible scenario that could possibly happen "

Where did I say anything of the sort?

I am merely pointing out that a butane torch is a pretty useless tool when it comes to terrorism against an aircraft.
because you must know all the possible scenarios, right? Is it possible that something you have never thought of could in fact happen and could cause a plane to go down?

Chip and Andy said...

Bold Posting Intern keeps insisting "....because you must know all the possible scenarios, right? "

Name one scenario where a hand held torch like the one pictured could bring down an aircraft.

Just one....

We'll wait...

Boldly said...

Chip and Andy said...
Bold Posting Intern keeps insisting "....because you must know all the possible scenarios, right? "

Name one scenario where a hand held torch like the one pictured could bring down an aircraft.

Just one....

We'll wait...

I cannot think of one. But I can imagine a lot can happen with a torch, an airplane and 38,000 feet of emptiness. Also, I'm also not willing to say that because I cant think of it, somebody else wont. And since they could, I'm OK with them not being on planes. Its just so simple to not take it with you. or put it in checked baggage if allowed.

Chip and Andy said...

..Boldly said... " I cannot think of one"

So you admit you can't think of one but surely a terrorist must be able to. So because the terrorists are so much smarter we should prohibit things from flying. The TSA can't even catch the things they are supposed to catch as evidenced by the JFK 11, the lady from Atlanta who made it to the gate with her revolver, and at least according to your Red Team Tests at least eighty percent of the time everything.

But better safe than sorry, right?

How about we disband the TSA and put the security back where it belongs... with the aircraft owners. They will find the best way to secure their very expensive equipment and use people who -can- think of ways to take down an aircraft with stuff and plan accordingly. AND as an added bonus the American Taxpayer will save close to eight billion dollars a year in tax dollars that are currently being wasted by people who think because a thing looks scary it has to be prohibited regardless of it actually being dangerous or not.

Wintermute said...

In that case, why allow pencils and ink pens? Knitting needles? Scissors? Shoe laces? Belts? Because it takes zero imagination to see how they could be used as threats, yet are allowed. But something you can't think of a way to weaponize isn't, because someone else MIGHT think of one? Where's the risk assessment of THAT logic?

Boldly said...

Chip and Andy said...
..Boldly said... " I cannot think of one"

So you admit you can't think of one but surely a terrorist must be able to.

please reread my response. Nowhere did I say a terrorist MUST be able to. Please do not put words in my mouth to meet your agenda. Thanks

Chip and Andy said...

Boldy said "...Nowhere did I say a terrorist MUST be able to. Please do not put words in my mouth "

You are correct, you did not say a terrorist MUST be able to. What you said, and I will quote your words exactly was ".. But I can imagine a lot can happen with a torch, an airplane and 38,000 feet of emptiness. "

A lot.

So you can't think of something but something must be possible because terrorists.

A lot can happen with a torch.

True again. But nothing could happen that could bring down an aircraft from 38,000 feet of emptiness. You can imagine a lot of things but couldn't name one scenario that would actually work. Second degree burns on one or two people... a bad smell from burnt plastic... a discharged fire extinguisher or two.... I could see the pilot taking the plane down before reaching the destination because of the smell of burnt hair but that is hardly something that would get a terrorist their seventy-two virgins in the afterlife.

You do understand that Terrorists are people, human beings (well at least on the outside), not super-killing-machines that can wreak havoc MacGuyver style using a common soldering torch and a chocobar with some hairpins.... you do understand that don't you?

As for your organization and their effectiveness in preventing even the plain-'ole run of the mill terrorists.... You can't bring a pocket knife but eight inch knitting needles are OK. You can't bring a blade of any kind but sewing scissors are OK. You can't bring bottles of liquid through the security checkpoint because they might be dangerous so we have to discard them into this common rubbish bin because it's not like they are dangerous or anything. You can't bring big bottles of anything through security but you can bring lots and lots of little bottles because somehow no one ever thought about pouring all the little bottles back into a big bottle is possible once past security. We are going to use these fancy new scanners that can be easily defeated simply by placing items on the sides of the body so their profile is too low to catch and are, in testing and in final use, less effective and take much longer than the regular walk-through-metal-detectors in use since the 60's. Laptop computers and similar sized electronics have to be placed in a separate bin to be scanned, unless you paid to be a member of this special group where you can keep your laptop computer and similar sized electronics in your carry on because they paid to prove they aren't a terrorist and no terrorist organization would ever try and pay the fee to get members into the special flying group that gets less security.

And those are just the highlights of your organization. Almost Eight Billion tax dollars every year to see the Kabuki the TSA calls security.

Your days are numbered. I don't know how big or small that number is but I know for a fact the number is counting down. A grandmother here, a model there, a couple more wheelchair bound individuals or another special-needs teenager is all it is going to take to tip the balance against you and tip it in such a way there won't be any amount of 'myth busting' that will save the organization.