Monday, February 6, 2017

TSA on the Job: TSA Academy Instructor

Natile R. Vinson
As a TSA Academy master security training instructor at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Glynco, Georgia, I provide training and motivation to seasoned and new officers daily to ensure they are prepared and confident as they head out to the field. 

I began my career with TSA in 2011 at Chicago O’Hare. During my time there, I held the positions of a transportation security officer, assistant training instructor and master security training instructor. I transferred to Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport in 2015 where I also functioned as a master security training instructor. These experiences allowed me to deeply understand and appreciate the importance of TSA’s mission to protect and secure the nation’s transportation systems and its people. 

Natile R. Vinson training an employee.
In 2016, I joined the TSA Academy at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center as a permanent instructor. I am proud that I took part in the rollout of the TSA officer basic training program in 2016, which requires all new hires to undergo training at the TSA Academy in Glynco, Georgia. This training builds foundational knowledge of TSA’s mission, vision and core values, and instills in participants an understanding of the critical role that they play as transportation security officers in ensuring TSA’s success as a high-performing counterterrorism organization. The training also leverages several TSA Academy resources that are not available at airports, such as fully functional checkpoints to train real-world scenarios and a live explosives demonstration. 

Joining TSA has allowed me to merge my passion of helping others reach their fullest potential through training and development, which contributes to officers successfully carrying out our mission. The most important lesson students take away is understanding the terrorist threat. By understanding the “why”, our students have a personal connection on the importance of their role at the airports. They understand that we have to get it right 100 percent of time. 



Guest Blogger Natile R. Vinson
TSA Academy Instructor 
Federal Law Enforcement Training Center

7 comments:

cmb said...

You are probably doing a fine job! I'm one of TSA's biggest fans...never have I had a bad experience (don't know why so many people are not happy, but I'm guessing THEY have a personality Snowflake problem, not the TSA agent).

Airports I recently traveled through: BOS, JFK, ATL, CLT, JAX, MIA. All the agents were perfect, even with my chemo metals still detectible in my bloodstream and urine.

RB said...

"As a TSA Academy master security training instructor at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Glynco, Georgia,"

Not a true statement. This person is an instructor at the TSA Training Academy which is located on the grounds of the Federal law Enforcement Training Center. What Federal law Enforcement training does she provide outside of TSA? I'm betting none!

Trying to make TSA screeners appear as law enforcement officers is a disservice to the public.

RB said...

I'd be interested in this TSA Academy Instructors comments on the recent ACLU report on the TSA BDO program.

https://www.aclu.org/report/bad-trip-debunking-tsas-behavior-detection-program?redirect=bad-trip

BAD TRIP: DEBUNKING THE TSA'S 'BEHAVIOR DETECTION' PROGRAM

The report’s key findings include:

The TSA expanded the scope of the behavior detection program and its use of surveillance techniques.

Academic research and other documents in the TSA’s own files reinforce that behavior detection is unscientific and unreliable.

The TSA repeatedly overstated the scientific validity of behavior detection in communications with members of Congress and the Government Accountability Office.

Materials in the TSA’s files raise further questions about anti-Muslim bias and the origins and focus of the TSA’s behavior detection program.

The TSA’s documents reveal details of specific instances of racial or religious profiling that the TSA concealed from the public.


More waste of tax dollars by TSA!

Yes4TSA said...

It is federal law to not take prohibited items on an aircraft. ... so she is teaching federal law to students and how to enforce those laws.

Boldly said...

RB said...
"As a TSA Academy master security training instructor at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Glynco, Georgia,"

Not a true statement. This person is an instructor at the TSA Training Academy which is located on the grounds of the Federal law Enforcement Training Center. What Federal law Enforcement training does she provide outside of TSA? I'm betting none!

Trying to make TSA screeners appear as law enforcement officers is a disservice to the public.

you're serious? This is your beef with her comment? Did she indicate she provides "law enforcement" training? No, what she said is 100% factually correct and not misleading in the least.
As long as ridiculous nit picking is going on, you said "I'm betting none." is it legal to gamble where you are or are you admitting to breaking the law?
see how stupid it sounds to nit pick semantics?

imsdac said...

She was my instructor at FLETC! Wonderful person and a great instructor.

TheDiligentChristian said...

Wow it's really sad how people will be that jealous, because someone has success in something that they NEVER was able to have. Such as "Instructor" title. Don't be angry because someone may have success in a field. I worked in corrections and it was a "law enforcement" field and no one can tell me it wasn't if the least it was REAL Criminal Justice field. People hated on that, but whatever, a job is worth having if it pays well, trains well and encourages growth. That's what an career is ALL about. But NEVER disrespect someone because you aren't happy with your life, remember we wouldn't even have law enforcement the way it is today with the firs, the Security, the watchman. Some don't know their history because it's over a million Security Officers and almost 500,000 law enforcement officers. If we include correctional officers and dispatch etc we barely touch 700,000. So above all respect someone's success, because another ones opinion doesn't diminish someones true committment and service or success in a field.