Tuesday, January 31, 2017

TSA Week in Review Jan 23rd - 29th: Concealed Items, Inert Explosive Devices and 49 Firearms

Firearms
TSA discovered 49 firearms last week in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 49 firearms discovered, 41 were loaded and 14 had a round chambered. All of the firearms pictured were discovered last week. See a complete list below.
Concealed Firearm
A traveler’s ankles alarmed after he stepped into the body scanner at Grand Junction (GJT). He had a loaded .40 caliber with a round chambered on one ankle and two magazines on the other. If you hold a conceal carry permit, it’s important you remember two things. 1) Conceal carry permits do not allow you to carry a concealed firearm on the aircraft. 2) Be sure to check your person and belongings prior to travel to ensure you’re not carrying a firearm or ammunition.
IED Training Aids
There were two separate incidents last week where inert improvised explosive device training aids were discovered. Bottles of liquid labeled sulfuric acid, hydrogen peroxide and acetone were discovered in checked bag along with multiple wires and 9-volt batteries at Savannah (SAV). The items were training aids for a military instructor. In a separate event, multiple improvised explosive device components (pictured here) including a container with initiators and detonators, a camera with wires protruding and two books on how to build improvised training devices were discovered in a checked bag at Washington Dulles (IAD). The items were training aids for a Norwegian police instructor. Even if they are inert, replica explosives are strictly prohibited from carry-on and checked bags as they can lead to evacuations.
Knives
One razorblade and two knives were discovered in the vest of a traveler’s service dog. Knives and razor blades are not allowed in carry-on bags, but may be packed in checked baggage.
Sword Cane
Two cane swords were discovered this week in carry-on bags at San Antonio (SAT) and Tampa (TPA). All knives and swords are prohibited and concealed items can lead to fines and arrest.
Knives and Throwing Stars
(Clockwise from the top) These items were discovered at: IAH, EWR, HNL, BOI, BWI and BWI
In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly in carry-on bags, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons, stun guns, small pocketknives and many other prohibited items too numerous to note. 

TSA discovered 49 firearms last week in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 49 firearms discovered, 41 were loaded and 14 had a round chambered.
When packed properly, ammunition can be transported in your checked baggage, but it is never permissible to pack ammo in your carry-on bag. 

You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline. 

You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms. 

Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure. 

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $11,000. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions; that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items. 

*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates. 

If you haven’t read them yet, make sure you check out our year in review posts for 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016. And don’t forget to check out our top 10 most unusual finds of 2016 video! 

Follow @TSA on Twitter and Instagram!

Bob Burns
TSA Social Media Team

15 comments:

Chip and Andy said...

So you find all this stuff but to date you haven't found bad guys trying to do harm to travellers or aircraft. I know many of the cheerleaders will try and claim success because of the lack of bad guys being caught but based on recent events including Ft Lauderdale isn't it becoming very apparent that the TSA isn't really accomplishing anything?

Boldly said...

Chip and Andy said...
So you find all this stuff but to date you haven't found bad guys trying to do harm to travellers or aircraft. I know many of the cheerleaders will try and claim success because of the lack of bad guys being caught but based on recent events including Ft Lauderdale isn't it becoming very apparent that the TSA isn't really accomplishing anything?

well Sir, you cannot with any accuracy make these claims. If TSA had stopped anyone who intended to do any harm, nobody would ever know it. with all the knives, pepper sprays, guns and what not taken, it is entirely possible that someone had intended to use some to do harm. But in a vast majority of cases, the item is simply abandoned at the checkpoint for disposal and no questions are asked of intent. There is absolutely no way with any sense of accuracy to say no person with ill intent has never been stopped by TSA. Had the screeners on 9-11 taken away the once legal box cutters, nobody would have ever known that 3000 plus lives where just saved.
As for Ft Lauderdale, that happened outside of the TSA's area of concern. That had nothing at all to do with TSA of their screening procedures. But nice try.

Chip and Andy said...

"...well Sir, you cannot with any accuracy make these claims."

And you, sir, can not refute my claims with any accuracy either. So what shall it be? Shall we draw straws? Flip a coin? Or rely on time-tested policies and return the security of the aircraft back to the people who actually own the aircraft?

Harry Broaders said...

Since it is very well known you can't bring guns on board (15 years since 9/11 it's pretty clear to everyone at this stage!), why on earth would that guy at GJT want to be bringing a concealed loaded gun on board? It's a totally reasonable risk assessment he intended to do harm. I would definitely not want that guy anywhere near any plane I'm on. Same goes for anyone else with disallowed items.

Yes4TSA said...

Chip and Andy said...
"So you find all this stuff but to date you haven't found bad guys trying to do harm to travellers or aircraft. I know many of the cheerleaders will try and claim success because of the lack of bad guys being caught but based on recent events including Ft Lauderdale isn't it becoming very apparent that the TSA isn't really accomplishing anything?"

Just give it up man. Do you want those items on your plane? People with guns?? I travel a lot and do not want anyone that is not supposed to have a gun acessable on my plane. Thank you TSA. You may not be perfect but if I am still breathing after my flight along with the millions of others flying daily I'd say you guys are doing something right.

And yes, if you actually read the news, the man obtained the firearm from his checked baggage after his flight. Not during his flight. I guess you're suggesting Tsa should no longer allowe firearms in checked baggage? Heck, I am ok with that. They can mail it to themselves.

Yes4TSA said...

Can you please do some critical thinking before your next post?

Mike Toreno said...

The reason we know that none of the intercepted items was carried by someone who intended to do any harm is that for ever knife stopped, 19 passed through, for every gun stopped, 19 passed through, for every explosive device stopped, 19 went through.

Hundreds and hundreds of guns, knives, and other weapons make it onto airplanes every week, and none of these are used in an attack. The event that the screening is supposed to prevent is so rare that it can't be prevented by screening, because a careful, planned effort could pass an elephant through the checkpoint. And this is true even if the TSA clerks did a good job - the result of the 95% failure rate is the clerks' focus on water, breast milk, snow globes, and peanut butter.

Unknown said...

Omg that is crazy to even try to go with that stuff 😳😳 thanks TSA for the catch

Yes4TSA said...

I am intrested in seeing the new undercover test results for 2016.

Boldly said...

Chip and Andy said...
"...well Sir, you cannot with any accuracy make these claims."

And you, sir, can not refute my claims with any accuracy either. So what shall it be? Shall we draw straws? Flip a coin? Or rely on time-tested policies and return the security of the aircraft back to the people who actually own the aircraft?

over 3000 murdered prior to TSA, zero attacks on an American based flight since TSA. I think the evidence leans my direction.

Chip and Andy said...

Boldly said...
Chip and Andy said...
"...well Sir, you cannot with any accuracy make these claims."

And you, sir, can not refute my claims with any accuracy either. So what shall it be? Shall we draw straws? Flip a coin? Or rely on time-tested policies and return the security of the aircraft back to the people who actually own the aircraft?

over 3000 murdered prior to TSA, zero attacks on an American based flight since TSA. I think the evidence leans my direction.

~~~

There have been zero attacks on an American Based flight since I switched to my new brand of toothpaste so a Thank You would be nice.

And the 3,000 that were murdered in the September 11th attack was not the fault of security screening measures. If you could send the TSA back in time, nothing they do now if done then would have prevented September 11th from happening so to try and claim success because it hasn't happened since it did is nothing more than trying to claim this rock prevents tiger attacks because I have not been attacked by a tiger since I have carried it with me.

Boldly said...

es4TSA said...
I am intrested in seeing the new undercover test results for 2016
I'm surprised anyone gives the tests any validity. A test that is designed to exploit a known weakness is hardly a measure of success. Its like testing children on something they don't know on the first day of school, than calling them failures. Its ridiculous. But the results fit the agenda of the haters, so run with it if it helps.

Boldly said...

Chip and Andy said...


There have been zero attacks on an American Based flight since I switched to my new brand of toothpaste so a Thank You would be nice. another lame and irrelevant response. Unless of course you changed brands specifically as a results of the attacks and your toothpaste is designed to stop further attacks.

And the 3,000 that were murdered in the September 11th attack was not the fault of security screening measures. If you could send the TSA back in time, nothing they do now if done then would have prevented September 11th from happening so to try and claim success because it hasn't happened since it did is nothing more than trying to claim this rock prevents tiger attacks because I have not been attacked by a tiger since I have carried it with me.
have you been attacked by tigers in the past? are they a legit threat now? did you start carrying a rock since your last attack? Why do you use such stupid analogies?
Yes, the policies in place by TSA if followed, absolutely without any doubt would have prevented the 9-11 attacks. to think otherwise is equivalent too thinking your above analogies make any sense at all.

Wintermute said...

A test with no insider knowledge is pretty darned valid if you ask me. And even if they had insider knowledge, everyone knows that the insider threat is the biggest one in security. Anyone with an ounce of common sense, anyhow. Which I suppose rules out the TSA.

Boldly said...

Wintermute said...
A test with no insider knowledge is pretty darned valid if you ask me. not always And even if they had insider knowledge, everyone knows that the insider threat is the biggest one in security. Anyone with an ounce of common sense, anyhow. Which I suppose rules out the TSA.
insider threat is a huge threat. Insider threat includes airport workers, TSA employees, pilots, flight attendants, baggage handlers, fuelers, caterers, and several other groups of people. I think that is why TSA screens everyone who comes in contact with a flight. Is it every person every day? I really doubt it. But I can say with 100% certainty these people are all randomly screened. It does not eliminate the threat, but nothing will. It will however greatly reduce it. A test even without "insider knowledge" is only a valid as that of which you are testing. If you are testing a known breaking point or weakness, it is hardly a failed test if it breaks.