Tuesday, December 6, 2016

TSA Week in Review November 28th - December 4th: 75 Firearms Discovered in Carry-On Bags This Week (67 loaded)

TSA discovered 75 firearms last week in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 75 firearms discovered, 67 were loaded and 31 had a round chambered. All of the firearms pictured were discovered last week. See a complete list below.
Four inert/replica grenades were discovered this week. Three were discovered in checked bags at Houston (IAH), Omaha (OMA) and Sioux Falls (FSD). One grenade was discovered in a carry-on bag at Milwaukee (MKE). We don’t know grenades are inert until our explosives professionals take a closer look, and that takes time and slows down the line. It can even lead to a complete shutdown and evacuation. The grenades pictured (L-R) were discovered at IAH and OMA.
Clockwise from the top, the knives were discovered in carry-on bags at BUF, IAH, CLE, SBA, BWI, TUL, SAN, BUR and BZN.


In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly in carry-on bags, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons, stun guns, small pocketknives and many other prohibited items too numerous to note. 

When packed properly, ammunition can be transported in your checked baggage, but it is never permissible to pack ammo in your carry-on bag.

You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline.


Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $11,000. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions; that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates.

Read our 2015 Year in Review post! If you haven’t read them yet, make sure you check out our year in review posts for 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014.

Follow @TSA on Twitter and Instagram!

Bob Burns
TSA Social Media Team

14 comments:

Wintermute said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
James Elsea said...

The stupidity of people never ceases to amaze me. Just look at the items they try to bring on the plane. They should know better.

Benny Alcala said...

what happens to all these guns when they are found,are they destroyed or kept and sold by TSA.I as well as the public would like to know.

RB said...

Wintermute, one might think that TSA has intentionally sabotaged this forum so it will fail and can be terminated.

Doober said...

75 guns this past week, 42 guns Thanksgiving week and 70 guns the week before Thanksgiving. TSA must have been so busy Thanksgiving week taking tubes of toothpaste, bottles of water and debasing passengers that they missed the guns.

screen shot/DHS IG statement

mcmadnes said...

I would say 75 stupid people, but 67 of them make stupid look good! So many negative comments about the TSA. How about some negative comments about the idiots that try to take their firearms for a visit to Grandma?? The TSA is scanning for terrorists but spend their time dealing with people that aren't terrorists that think the law doesn't apply to them.

Wintermute said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Chip and Andy said...

"...Four inert/replica grenades were discovered this week. Three were discovered in checked bags"

Again, still.... passengers have no access to the luggage compartment during flight so why would an inert anything in a checked bag be a problem?

Unknown said...

How do I get a replacement TSA Precheck card?

Wintermute said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Boldly said...

Chip and Andy said...
"...Four inert/replica grenades were discovered this week. Three were discovered in checked bags"

Again, still.... passengers have no access to the luggage compartment during flight so why would an inert anything in a checked bag be a problem?

really? this has been answered so many times. Think for a minute, you will come up with the answer..
let me help a little...who has access to baggage AND the plane before it leaves the ground? Go ahead, you can say it. correct, baggage handlers, fuelers, flight crew...now, look up the definition of "insider threat."
Perhaps you forgot about them...

Chip and Andy said...

Boldy asked .... who has access to baggage AND the plane before it leaves the ground? Go ahead, you can say it. correct, baggage handlers, fuelers, flight crew...now, look up the definition of "insider threat."
Perhaps you forgot about them...

Oh! You mean the people that don't go through the scanners to get to work? Those people? The ones who have direct access to the craft with no oversight or inspections by the TSA?

You can do better.... The insider threats you mentioned couldn't possibly do anything to harm an aircraft without the help of passengers smuggling inert grenades in their luggage. /Sarc

Boldly said...

Oh! You mean the people that don't go through the scanners to get to work? Those people? The ones who have direct access to the craft with no oversight or inspections by the TSA?

yes, those are the same people. And thanks for proving my point. The same questions are asked repeatedly here and yet some people wonder why they don't get answered. I have often said (in most cases) the question is being asked by someone who already knows the answer but chooses not to accept it. It is what it is. No security system or agency is without its weaknesses. But steps are taken ( not allowing certain inert items in checked baggage) to minimize the risk. Its just logical. Maybe that is what messes up so many people.

Wintermute said...
This comment has been removed by the author.