Friday, October 14, 2016

TSA Week in Review October 7th - 13th

Firearms discovered in carry-on bags.

TSA discovered 75 firearms this week in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 75 firearms discovered, 66 were loaded and 25 had a round chambered. All of the firearms pictured were discovered in the last week. See a complete list below.
Bear mace

Bear repellent is discovered on a nearly weekly basis. Four cans were discovered in carry-on bags this week at Honolulu (HNL) and Seattle (SEA). This is a reminder that bear repellent is prohibited in the cabin of an aircraft. You can pack bear repellent in your checked bag if the volume is less than four ounces and if it has less than a two percent active ingredient of either CS or CN. Most bear repellents exceed these limitations.
Inert hand grenades

Three realistic replica grenades were discovered this week in carry-on bags. Two were discovered at Atlanta (ATL), and one at Rochester (ROC).
Various bladed weapons
Clockwise from the top, the pictured items were discovered in carry-on bags at: LGA, BNA, LAS, SAN, DTW and LYH.


In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly in carry-on bags, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons, stun guns, small pocketknives and many other prohibited items too numerous to note. 



Chart: TSA discovered 75 firearms this week in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 75 firearms discovered, 66 were loaded and 25 had a round chambered.
When packed properly, ammunition can be transported in your checked baggage, but it is never permissible to pack ammo in your carry-on bag.



You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline.






Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.



Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $11,000. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions; that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.



*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates.



Read our 2015 Year in Review post! If you haven’t read them yet, make sure you check out our year in review posts for 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014.



Follow @TSA on Twitter and Instagram!



Bob Burns
TSA Social Media Team

31 comments:

Chip and Andy said...

"...Three realistic replica grenades were discovered this week in carry-on bags. '

Did the Explosives Detection Team determine they were replicas? Or someone else?

And once they were determined to be replicas were they allowed to fly? If not, why not?

RB said...

Somehow TSA has been tasked with keeping Samsung Galaxy Note 7's off of airplanes. Does that mean TSA will have to look at every cell phone that crosses the checkpoint?

Wintermute said...

Given TSA's penchant for disallowing vaguely looking "replicas," (miniature toy guns, plastic swords, etc) one wonders if all cell phones will be considered Note 7 replicas under the new guidelines.

GSOLTSO said...

RB sez - "Somehow TSA has been tasked with keeping Samsung Galaxy Note 7's off of airplanes. Does that mean TSA will have to look at every cell phone that crosses the checkpoint?"


TSA is deferring to the FAA/DOT announcement, please read it here:

https://www.transportation.gov/briefing-room/dot-bans-all-samsung-galaxy-note7-phones-airplanes

There may be more information upcoming, but I do not have anything other than the original announcement at this time.

West
TSA Blog Team

Boldly said...

Chip and Andy said...
"...Three realistic replica grenades were discovered this week in carry-on bags. '

Did the Explosives Detection Team determine they were replicas? Or someone else?

And once they were determined to be replicas were they allowed to fly? If not, why not?

just going out on a limb here and allowing logic to provide an answer. I really doubt they were allowed to travel. They are replica weapons and all signs clearly say " No Replica Weapons." Pretty sure that would qualify.

Boldly said...

Somehow TSA has been tasked with keeping Samsung Galaxy Note 7's off of airplanes. Does that mean TSA will have to look at every cell phone that crosses the checkpoint?

where is there documentation that says TSA has anything to do with the ban? I have looked, I cant find anything that puts this in TSA's lap.

RB said...

https://twitter.com/deepaKPCC/status/788598715187625984

Apparently TSA is back to strip searching travelers.

Doober said...

Boldy wrote: "where is there documentation that says TSA has anything to do with the ban? I have looked, I cant find anything that puts this in TSA's lap."

Who else is going to keep these phones off planes, Boldy? Are we now going to hire Galaxy Note 7 police?

Doober said...

Bob, back on August 5, in response to a question, @AskTSA told a traveler that butter is not allowed in carry-on in amt. >3.4 oz. when the TSA website says it is allowed. When this was pointed out to @AskTsa, they said the website would be updated.

https://twitter.com/AskTSA/status/761541262549843972

As of today, October 20, the website still indicates that butter is allowed:

https://apps.tsa.dhs.gov/mytsa/cib_results.aspx?search=butter

Can't bring a stick of butter or package of cream cheese on board, but one can bring an unbaked cheesecake as carry on. http://www.flyertalk.com/forum/26188997-post1.html
Doesn't make much sense to me. But then again, this is the TSA.

And why does TSA allow a camera tripod but not collapsible trekking poles? A collapsed tripod makes a much better weapon that even two trekking poles.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Boldly said...

Boldy wrote: "where is there documentation that says TSA has anything to do with the ban? I have looked, I cant find anything that puts this in TSA's lap."

Who else is going to keep these phones off planes, Boldy? Are we now going to hire Galaxy Note 7 police?

the public can't just decide that it is TSA's responsibility and then criticize them for it.
Unless you have something that says it is their job, don't assume that it is. A Galaxy note is NOT a threat to security. Thus it would not fall under the job description of TSA. It is a threat to aviation and safety, thus it is a FAA issue.

Boldly said...

And why does TSA allow a camera tripod but not collapsible trekking poles? A collapsed tripod makes a much better weapon that even two trekking poles.

I have taken my poles several times. Never had a problem.

Wintermute said...

But, because the TSA has to call LEO if they find something illegal, and the Note 7 is now illegal on planes, then it is the TSA who will be on the same lookout as they are for drugs. So, yes, it is sorta their responsibility.

Doober said...

Boldy wrote: "I have taken my poles several times. Never had a problem."

Well, Boldy, if you took them as carry-on, then your beloved TSA was wrong in allowing you to do so:

https://twitter.com/gwydionismyhero/status/772108661028065280

Boldy also wrote: "It is a threat to aviation and safety, thus it is a FAA issue."

The FAA has declared many things to be a treat to aviation and safety and it is up to the TSA to find those prohibited items, such as flammable aerosols.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Boldly said...

But, because the TSA has to call LEO if they find something illegal, and the Note 7 is now illegal on planes, then it is the TSA who will be on the same lookout as they are for drugs. So, yes, it is sorta their responsibility.

why on earth would they call a LEO? They are not illegal. They are simply not allowed on a plane. helium balloons aren't either but I don't see the police being called for them. TSA looks for items that are a security threat. You fine folks cant just make up your own agenda and then get mad at someone else for it. Now if you can find something from TSA or any other reliable source that says they are being banned by TSA, Ill retract my statements.

Boldly said...

Boldy wrote: "I have taken my poles several times. Never had a problem."

Well, Boldy, if you took them as carry-on, then your beloved TSA was wrong in allowing you to do so:

https://twitter.com/gwydionismyhero/status/772108661028065280

Boldy also wrote: "It is a threat to aviation and safety, thus it is a FAA issue."

The FAA has declared many things to be a treat to aviation and safety and it is up to the TSA to find those prohibited items, such as flammable aerosols

ahh, twitter as a reliable source, good one. Mobility devices are allowed as carry on. it would fall under the AWD act.

An flammable aerosol can could be used as a weapon, not a cell phone.

Wintermute said...

Project much? I never said I was mad. Just disputing your point, which I doubt you even remember, you change goalposts so often.

Wintermute said...

At least the source was sited... Something you STILL refuse to do when called on bogus numbers.

Wintermute said...

If you can't use a cell phone as a weapon, you're not very creative. And if it ignites while being used as a weapon, all the better (for the person wielding it as such).

Chip and Andy said...

Bold Posting Intern said "...An flammable aerosol can could be used as a weapon, not a cell phone."

If I hit you on the head hard enough with either one of them you are going to be just as unconscious so what makes the aerosol can worthy of so much more scrutiny than the mobile phone?

TSORon said...

Boldly said...
"You fine folks cant just make up your own agenda and then get mad at someone else for it."

Sure they can, they have been doing it for years now.

Boldly said...

If I hit you on the head hard enough with either one of them you are going to be just as unconscious so what makes the aerosol can worthy of so much more scrutiny than the mobile phone?

you are kidding, right? Of course you are. For a brief moment I thought, "nobody could possibly be this..." then I realized it was a joke. Good one.

Wintermute said...

Maybe they were being a bit facetious, perhaps not. Either way, I think the point is that almost anything can be used as a weapon, so concentrating on some non-weapon items but not others is silly. It is completely arbitrary as to what "dangerous" items are allowed and what ones aren't. Small "pen" knife is disallowed. Pair of hinged knives (Also known as scissors) isn't. And I completely understand that the TSA was going to allow knives but we're pressured not to. This only proves the point that TSA concentrated on non-threat items.

Doober said...

Hi, Ronnie! How are you?

Boldy, here's some reading for you: "Individuals who own or possess a Samsung Galaxy Note7 device may not transport the device on their person, in carry-on baggage, or in checked baggage on flights to, from, or within the United States"

https://www.transportation.gov/briefing-room/dot-bans-all-samsung-galaxy-note7-phones-airplanes

Who is going to check to see if an individual is transporting such a device "on their person" or "in carry-on baggage"? I'll ask again are there going to be Note7 police at all checkpoints or is TSA going to be looking for such things? The answer is: TSA

https://twitter.com/TSAmedia_LisaF/status/788408868980260864

Doober said...

Boldy wrote, in reference to this link, https://twitter.com/gwydionismyhero/status/772108661028065280: "ahh, twitter as a reliable source, good one. Mobility devices are allowed as carry on. it would fall under the AWD act."

Only, Boldy, if they are used as walking assists while approaching a checkpoint. (Which I always advise people to do.) If they are in your carryon, you're not going to get them on board.

I guess Boldy didn't bother to open and read the link. Why am I not surprised?

screen shot/DHS IG statement

Boldly said...

I guess Boldy didn't bother to open and read the link. Why am I not surprised?

correct, I don't open links. Never know where they may take you.
I can guarantee, no TSA officer in the country would stop me from taking my walking poles. They are not doctors, they cannot determine the level at which I need aid walking. As soon as I say I need them to walk, the conversation is over.

Boldly said...

Boldy, here's some reading for you: "Individuals who own or possess a Samsung Galaxy Note7 device may not transport the device on their person, in carry-on baggage, or in checked baggage on flights to, from, or within the United States"

https://www.transportation.gov/briefing-room/dot-bans-all-samsung-galaxy-note7-phones-airplanes

Who is going to check to see if an individual is transporting such a device "on their person" or "in carry-on baggage"? I'll ask again are there going to be Note7 police at all checkpoints or is TSA going to be looking for such things? The answer is: TSA

ok, that is your conclusion. As I asked before, where is there anything official that says it falls under TSA authority? You cannot just decide this on your own.
TSA may remind someone that they cannot have it on a plane if it is found during screening, but they are not going to be looking in bags or on people specify for note 7s. They aren't going to do bag checks on bags with phones in a hunt for note 7s.

Wintermute said...

Just like they don't "look" for drugs. Even though many of the "security" procedures are better at finding drugs than WEI.

Doober said...

I guess Boldy doesn't open links not because he's concerned about where they might take him, but because he doesn't care to learn.

If he'd opened one link about he would have learned that contrary to his belief: "If @TSA sees a Note 7 phone, travelers will not go past checkpoint, will be referred to their airline." This is exactly the way TSA handles drugs and guns, only difference being they will refer to the airline and not LE.

Boldy also wrote: "I can guarantee, no TSA officer in the country would stop me from taking my walking poles. They are not doctors, they cannot determine the level at which I need aid walking. As soon as I say I need them to walk, the conversation is over."

Sorry, but if your poles are in your carry-on, you're going to run into difficulty at the checkpoint using your argument.

GSOLTSO said...

You are 100% correct, TSA does not "look" for drugs. However, if we do find them in the course of cleaeing a possible threat item, we are obligated to report them to local LEOs.

West
TSA Blog Team

Wintermute said...

Just ignore the fact that your procedures are better at finding drugs than WEI,thereby missing my point entirely.

Wintermute said...

Sounds like someone doesn't use the Internet then... It's made up entirely of links.