Friday, August 19, 2016

TSA Week in Review August 12th - 18th - A Record Breaking 81 Firearms Discovered in Carry-on Bags This Week - 70 Loaded

Discovered firearms

TSA discovered a record breaking 81 firearms this week in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 81 firearms discovered, 70 were loaded and 31 had a round chambered. The previous record of 78 firearms was set last week. All of the firearms pictured were discovered in the last week. See a complete list below.

Discovered throwing knives and swords
Top - Bottom, items discovered in carry-on bags: Two swords and throwing knives (HOU) - Cane sword (LGA), Kaiser blade (IAH) - Machete (EWR)
Discovered knives
Left - Right, items discovered in carry-on bags at: BWI, EWR, BIL, PHX, ORD, BNA and IAH


In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly in carry-on bags, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons, stun guns, small pocketknives and many other prohibited items too numerous to note.



Table for discovered firearms in carry-on bags list
When packed properly, ammunition can be transported in your checked baggage, but it is never permissible to pack ammo in your carry-on bag.



You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline.






Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.



Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $11,000. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions; that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.



*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates.



Read our 2015 Year in Review post! If you haven’t read them yet, make sure you check out our year in review posts for 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014.



Follow @TSA on Twitter and Instagram!



Bob Burns
TSA Social Media Team

39 comments:

Anonymous said...

They Ned to put people in jail to let them know airport security is very important. Slap a $5,000 fine on them and next time they will remember they have the weapon.

Anonymous said...

ZOMG! Eighty guns! Some of them were even loaded! That's like one one-hundeth of a percent of the passengers you screened last week! Less even!

And that is like a million dollars of our taxes used to find each one of them!

Too bad you still haven't caught, or even found, a Terrorist yet.

Richard Wagner said...

Gee, this must be a new law that you can't carry weapons on an aircraft. How stupid can these people be to just give their weapons away. Stupid people.

Henry Wearsch said...

What happens to these confiscated items; in particular the guns and ammunition?

Adrian said...

How can a "TSA Week in Review" omit major incidents like the "human stampede" at JFK?

The incident raises tons of questions whose exploration might lead to more effective response.

1. Is the government policy of fanning the flames of fear actually making us less safe by increasing the likelihood of mass panic?

2. Does the TSA have effective plans for dealing with a large scale false alarm? Does law enforcement? How was the coordination? Should these plans be altered in light of how this incident played out?

3. I assume many people who thought they were running for their lives left their bags in the terminal. After the incident, how does TSA clear all these unattended items and get them back to their owners?

4. Was the perceived gunfire an accident or a hoax? What if it was a hoax to distract from an actual terror plot? What if the stampede was the intent?

5. Why did the people who initially thought they heard gun fire believe that someone could have gotten firearms past security?

6. What are TSA's plans if something similar happens amid other transportation infrastructure, like a train or subway station?

If the "TSA Week in Review" is just going to be a tally of the firearms found in airport screening and completely ignore every major transportation security event, then it could use a new title.

alpLewes said...

Why do we allow firearms on planes at all? Ridiculous. Leave them at home. What is it, some kind of macho thing? And loaded, that's sheer stupidity and scary to think of. The last thing I try to not do is to fly!

Anonymous said...

I would like to apologize to the TSA. I was on a business trip last week and was able to squeeze in a half day of hiking in South Lake Tahoe. When checking in for my flight (AA2442) back to Philadelphia at Reno/Tahoe my carry on bag was pulled because I had inadvertently left my slapjack in it instead of putting it into my checked baggage. A slapjack is a 6" piece of leather with a weight sown in on one end. I carry it when hiking because it is an effective deterrent if attacked by a four legged predator. Much unnecessary time was wasted by the TSA when they have much bigger issues to worry about. I had no idea regarding the extent of their challenges. Again, I apologize for my error and will be more diligent in the future. Many thanks to the TSA for keeping us all safe. KRG

Susan Richart said...

I don't suppose we'll get a comment from West or Bob or anyone on this incident:

https://www.facebook.com/ali.bergstrom.9/posts/10210596090042613

Does the "training academy" teach intimidation by surrounding passengers? Is there an intimidation squad?

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Susan Richart said...

Adrian, according to NewsDay:

'...TSA agents ran through an airport terminal, screaming about the presence of a bomb and a shooting victim, neither of which was true."

https://www.newsday.com/news/new-york/homeland-security-investigating-kennedy-airport-false-alarm-1.12203075

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Anonymous said...

From the August 5 post:

"I would like that as well. After further communication with Bob, the wording was not changed. I am interested to see what this person is talking about."

You want the person to post the screen cap, but you know very well that you don't allow any way to post images. Typical bureaucrat. Remind me never to fly out of Greensboro or Cincinnati.

Anonymous said...

>The last thing I try to not do is to fly!

Speak English much? I sure hope you're not in line in front of me.

Fix the TSA said...

Bob, good job not cutting off images this week. I see a time stamp on one of the images. That is appreciated.

Why do the shadows on the bottom row, second from left gun photo look so strange? Orange and blue shadows?

One of the knife photos includes a QR code from the passenger's boarding pass. This code contains private information about the individual.

Fix the TSA said...

The TSA screeners at JFK who recently ran through the terminal screaming, "There's a bomb!" and "Run for your lives! There's an active shooter!" should be fired. They caused needless panic and made it more difficult for real law enforcement to do their job - and it looks like the police weren't at their best either.

Fix the TSA said...

@ Richard Wagner - are associated with RWCO?

Anonymous said...

>They Ned to put people in jail to let them know airport security is very important.

I don't know who Ned is, but no airport has been hijacked yet. It's hard to get those suckers off the ground.

Susan Richart said...

Bob or West, why does @AskTSA respond to complaints about baggage screeners making a mess of one's suitcase with:

"Our officers are required to exercise great care in returning items in checked baggage, in the same way they were found."

You know full well that your screeners (not "officers") really don't give a hoot.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Redgage LLC said...

Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested,” the tsa says. According to the TSA, passengers can travel with firearms in checked bags, but they have to be declared to the airline first. If prohibited items are found, the passenger can face up to $11,000 in fines.

Thanks !!

Anonymous said...

As always, absolutely nothing you needed your slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners to detect. Meanwhile, how many people suffered physical searches thanks to false alarms on these useless machines?

Why are Curtis Burns and West Cooper unwilling to address, let alone answer, that question?

How many weeks has it been since you last trumpeted something dangerous you found with the naked body scanners?

Anonymous said...

All this patting-yourself-on-the-back about how many guns you find each week is just pathetic. It's not like the contents of carry-on bags disappear into an alternate dimension that can only be detected by the TSA. Figuring out what's in a bag is more or less your basic job description, so why all the hoopla? And don't try to tell me that looking at screen images is difficult. In WWII, the Navy trained pigeons to guide bombs by pecking at a screen (don't believe me? Look up Project Pigeon.) If TSA agents aren't as smart as pigeons, hire the pigeons.

Not only that, but this focus on raw numbers (with no relevant threat analysis) certainly makes it look like TSA agents have quotas, just like speed-trap cities give their cops ticket quotas.

Furthermore, by taking guns away from innocent citizens, you are taking away their ability to defend themselves in the event of a real incident. Instead of taking guns away, you ought to be issuing them at the gate.

Finally, I've had security clearances and SSBIs that you don't even know exist, and YOU are going to tell ME that I can't be trusted?

Anonymous said...

How do we know that TSA isn't salting baggage with guns? It's odd how there aren't any guns when people leave home, but then guns mysteriously show up at the airport. Surely that many people can't be "forgetting." And once a bag disappears into the x-ray machine, how do we know what the TSA is doing in there? How do we know that the ATF or FBI, or local police departments, aren't providing seized firearms to the TSA so the TSA can put the guns into baggage and thereby justify their existence?

GSOLTSO said...

Susan sez - "You know full well that your screeners (not "officers") really don't give a hoot."

This is simply not true. Any time I have to perform a bag clearance, I take great effort to place the items back in as close to the original condition as possible. I also know several Officers at many airports that feel the same.

Anon sez - "How do we know that TSA isn't salting baggage with guns?"

That is just silly. If that were the case, there would be tons of people out there talking to news groups explaining it. Wow.

Anon sez - "I would like to apologize to the TSA."

I will forward this comment to the the leadership at Reno/Tahoe, we appreciate your comments, and hope to see you again soon - minus the slapjack!

Anon sez - "You want the person to post the screen cap, but you know very well that you don't allow any way to post images. Typical bureaucrat. Remind me never to fly out of Greensboro or Cincinnati."

We would love to see a copy of the screencap, please send it to us at the blog email here -

TSABlog@tsa.dhs.gov

Thanks a ton, I look forward to seeing what you are talking about.


West
TSA Blog Team

Anonymous said...

I think you need to stop reading infowars.

GSOLTSO said...

Henry sez - "What happens to these confiscated items; in particular the guns and ammunition?"

Once a firearm or ammunition is discovered, the local Law Enforcement Officers are contacted, and respond to take possession of the items. The disposition of any firearms or ammunition are the responsibility of the responding local LEOs. Each individual department has their own set of protocols for dealing with the firearm discoveries (as each different jurisdiction has different laws that may apply).

West
TSA Blog Team

Anonymous said...

You are telling me that you don't know how to post a link to a photo or email a photo to the TSA blog team? (Here is a pro tip on how to "internet good". Click on the "contact us" and you get the blogs email address)

Susan Richart said...

West wrote: "Any time I have to perform a bag clearance, I take great effort to place the items back in as close to the original condition as possible."

We know that you are perfect, West, as are the other screeners that you know.

However, if you'd actually read what I wrote (does "Hope" ring a bell?), you'd know I was referring to baggage screeners - the ones behind the scenes. How often do you perform checked bag screening?

screen shot/DHS IG statement

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
I would like to apologize to the TSA. I was on a business trip last week and was able to squeeze in a half day of hiking in South Lake Tahoe. When checking in for my flight (AA2442) back to Philadelphia at Reno/Tahoe my carry on bag was pulled because I had inadvertently left my slapjack in it instead of putting it into my checked baggage. A slapjack is a 6" piece of leather with a weight sown in on one end. I carry it when hiking because it is an effective deterrent if attacked by a four legged predator. Much unnecessary time was wasted by the TSA when they have much bigger issues to worry about. I had no idea regarding the extent of their challenges. Again, I apologize for my error and will be more diligent in the future. Many thanks to the TSA for keeping us all safe. KRG

August 20, 2016 at 2:48 PM

..................

From my reading of Nevada code a Slapjack/Blackjack is an illegal weapon. I'm wondering why local law enforcement wasn't called? Bigger question is which TSA employee took the weapon home with them?

TSA?

Anonymous said...

How many terrorist 9 year old boys were stopped by TSA? Because according to your agents not apologizing for their actions, it seems to happen all the time. http://www.fox9.com/news/195016855-story

Anonymous said...

This is simply not true. Any time I have to perform a bag clearance, I take great effort to place the items back in as close to the original condition as possible. I also know several Officers at many airports that feel the same.

---

With all due respect, Mr. West, I fly in and out of GSO a few times a year. Even at Christmas it's not exactly anywhere near what one would call "busy". I've never noticed a issue with my bags being re-packed at GSO, where things tend to be pretty slow and there aren't a lot of bags to check. I've noticed a lot of problems with busier airports.

Wintermute said...

You're afraid that someone who makes the occasional typo on a blog isn't in front of you in line? Or you're xenophobic and hope non-English speakers aren't in front of you in line? Or that was a personal attack on the previous poster, thus violating blog policies? I'm which case, who allowed it through moderation?

Anonymous said...

Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested,” the tsa says. According to the TSA, passengers can travel with firearms in checked bags, but they have to be declared to the airline first. If prohibited items are found, the passenger can face up to $11,000 in fines.

Sooo, you determine they have no intent to cause harm yet still treat them as if they did. Way to go. Check your 4th amendment rights at the ticket counter America.

Anonymous said...

GSOLTSO said...
Henry sez - "What happens to these confiscated items; in particular the guns and ammunition?"

Once a firearm or ammunition is discovered, the local Law Enforcement Officers are contacted, and respond to take possession of the items. The disposition of any firearms or ammunition are the responsibility of the responding local LEOs. Each individual department has their own set of protocols for dealing with the firearm discoveries (as each different jurisdiction has different laws that may apply).

West
TSA Blog Team
###########
Why aren't the terrorists who are trying to bring these guns on aboard arrested? Its not like they are a 9 year old with a pacemaker.
https://www.facebook.com/ali.bergstrom.9/posts/10210596090042613

Anonymous said...

>We would love to see a copy of the screencap, please send it to us at the blog email here

Wouldn't it be easier if I just emailed it to the attention of ECHELON@blackSUV.gov?

Fix the TSA said...

West, your reply to Henry is helpful information. This is the kind of response that American citizens need from this blog.

GSOLTSO said...

Susan sez - "We know that you are perfect, West, as are the other screeners that you know.

However, if you'd actually read what I wrote (does "Hope" ring a bell?), you'd know I was referring to baggage screeners - the ones behind the scenes. How often do you perform checked bag screening?"

I am good, but I am not THAT good.

I did read what you wrote and understood it quite well. I have worked checked bags this week, and do so most weeks. I make every effort to repack the bags as close to original condition as I possibly can.

Anon sez - "Wouldn't it be easier if I just emailed it to the attention of ECHELON@blackSUV.gov?"

Well, that may work, but it would take it a lot longer to get to us through official channels...

Anon sez - "With all due respect, Mr. West, I fly in and out of GSO a few times a year. Even at Christmas it's not exactly anywhere near what one would call "busy". I've never noticed a issue with my bags being re-packed at GSO, where things tend to be pretty slow and there aren't a lot of bags to check. I've noticed a lot of problems with busier airports."

We appreciate your business, and we truly appreciate the kind comments! I was pointing out that I actually work at GSO, and I make every effort to repack passengers items as close to the original condition as I possibly can. To be honest, in some cases, we are actually able to help passengers repack things to fit better (well, a few times anyway). Next time you are in at GSO, I would love to say hello, just ask for West in the checkpoint area.

West
TSA blog Team

RB said...

I did read what you wrote and understood it quite well. I have worked checked bags this week, and do so most weeks. I make every effort to repack the bags as close to original condition as I possibly can.



Anon sez - "With all due respect, Mr. West, I fly in and out of GSO a few times a year. Even at Christmas it's not exactly anywhere near what one would call "busy". I've never noticed a issue with my bags being re-packed at GSO, where things tend to be pretty slow and there aren't a lot of bags to check. I've noticed a lot of problems with busier airports."

We appreciate your business, and we truly appreciate the kind comments! I was pointing out that I actually work at GSO, and I make every effort to repack passengers items as close to the original condition as I possibly can. To be honest, in some cases, we are actually able to help passengers repack things to fit better (well, a few times anyway). Next time you are in at GSO, I would love to say hello, just ask for West in the checkpoint area.

West
TSA blog Team

August 24, 2016 at 11:25 AM

I have a hard time understanding why one of TSA's BDO's would be working Checked Bags. Or has the BDO program quietly been disbanded?

Did it ever occur to yourself that a person might pack a bag not so much to fit better but to create cushion zones in order to protect some item?

I pack my bags in a certain manner that I believe are best for my purposes. For some government employee to presume to know better than I on how to pack "MY BAG" tells us something about the mindset found at TSA.

Inspect if you must but return things exactly as they were found!

Wintermute said...

Because they're not terrorists, and TSA is not law enforcement.

Anonymous said...

>Well, that may work, but it would take it a lot longer to get to us through official channels...

But it would get to the action unit faster. I know what desaparecido means.

Anonymous said...

How many off-duty cops did TSA save us from?

GSOLTSO said...

Rb sez - "I pack my bags in a certain manner that I believe are best for my purposes. For some government employee to presume to know better than I on how to pack "MY BAG" tells us something about the mindset found at TSA.

Inspect if you must but return things exactly as they were found!"

One of the first questions in the checkpoint after a bag search is "Would you like to repack your bag, or do you have a specific way you would like me to repack it". If the passenger has a certain way they like things packed, more power to them, it is the way they like it, and I make every effort to help them get things back to the way they wish them to be. Some passengers do not pack their bag a specific way, and therefore, when it comes to repacking, we are able to get things in the bag so there is less pressure on the zipper or snaps and such. If I do a bag search in checked baggage, I do my best to get things back in the bag exactly the way that they were when I removed them.

I presumed nothing, I merely made an observation based upon personal experiences in a checkpoint setting.

West
TSA Blog Team