Friday, June 17, 2016

TSA Week in Review: June 10th - 16th - 61 Firearms Discovered in Carry-on Bags This Week (51 Loaded)

Discovered 61 firearms

Sixty-one firearms were discovered this week in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 61 firearms discovered, 51 were loaded and 21 had a round chambered. All of the firearms pictured were discovered last week. See a complete list below.

Discovered knives


All of these knives were discovered in a carry-on bag at Denver (DEN).


Discovered knives

Clockwise from the top, these items were discovered at: SLC, DAL, ORD, RDU, ORD, PHX and ORD.

Discovered fireworks

These were discovered in a carry-on bag at Charleston (CHS). All fireworks are strictly prohibited in both carry-on and checked bags.

Discovered ammunition in a power supply

150 rounds of 9mm ammunition were discovered concealed in a power supply in a checked bag. Ammunition is permitted in checked baggage when packed properly.

Discovered an axe under the lining and wedged between the handle mechanisum of a carry-on bag
This axe was discovered concealed under the lining and wedged between the handle mechanism of a carry-on bag at Tampa (TPA).


In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly in carry-on bags, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons, stun guns, small pocketknives and many other prohibited items too numerous to note.


Table for discovered firearms in carry-on bags list
You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline.






Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.



Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $11,000. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions; that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.



*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates.



Read our 2015 Year in Review post! If you haven’t read them yet, make sure you check out our year in review posts for 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014.



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Bob Burns
TSA Social Media Team

36 comments:

Fix the TSA said...

Bob, you had a pretty good streak of a couple weeks for not cutting off photos, but you've slipped back into your old habits again. Leftmost photos in top two rows of gun montage are cutoff.

Another week where NONE of the images have timestamps. This started after I rightly mentioned how timestamps were being added post-photo, blurred, and manipulated.

Why are you denying the American public accurate information and proof that the photos you display each week actually were taken that week?

Bob, you've been caught too many times reposting pictures or posting pictures not taken that week. An anonymous commenter stated here that not every photo was even taken by the TSA. Is that true?

Transparency in the government is important, Bob. Why are you hiding? What are you hiding?

Anonymous said...

As always, absolutely nothing you needed your slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners to detect. Meanwhile, how many people suffered physical searches thanks to false alarms on these useless machines?

Why are Curtis Burns and West Cooper unwilling to address, let alone answer, that question?

How many weeks has it been since you last trumpeted something dangerous you found with the naked body scanners?

Anonymous said...

Fix the TSA--we think you should change your name to "Fix the General Public." All of our jobs (TSA, Law Enforcement, Airport) would get easier if the travelling public would just use some common sense. Now who thinks that concealing an axe in a carry-on bag is actually going to work, nonetheless that its even appropriate to try to board an aircraft with one? I'll try one more time. Bob's not taking the pictures. It's a combo of local law enforcement, TSA, and airport security. So how is he responsible for the photos? Or for that matter, why are the photos important? What's important is that 61 people tried to take a firearm through screening, despite the fact it should be well known that they are prohibited. Don't fix the TSA--fix that.

Anonymous said...

Does TSA collect and share demographic data on the individuals caught concealing weapons in carryon luggage?

Wintermute said...

The fact that you don't get why the photos are important, when the reason is explained right there in the comment, is part of the problem.

RB said...

Anonymous said...Fix the TSA--we think you should change your name to "Fix the General Public." All of our jobs (TSA, Law Enforcement, Airport) would get easier if the travelling public would just use some common sense. Now who thinks that concealing an axe in a carry-on bag is actually going to work, nonetheless that its even appropriate to try to board an aircraft with one? I'll try one more time. Bob's not taking the pictures. It's a combo of local law enforcement, TSA, and airport security. So how is he responsible for the photos? Or for that matter, why are the photos important? What's important is that 61 people tried to take a firearm through screening, despite the fact it should be well known that they are prohibited. Don't fix the TSA--fix that.June 19, 2016 at 9:35 AM
*******************************
Around 2,000,000 people fly each day in the United States so 61 firearms, a true threat, still represents a tiny fraction of all travelers.

I would entertain a heavier response for a weapons violation than a fine, as long as due process was followed, such as 1 year on the No Fly List for the first violation. As much as I think TSA is focused on the wrong things I believe most people would agree that firearms cannot travel in the cabin. Around where I live many people routinely carry knives so I don't worry about sharps very much.

I would find it interesting knowing how much of these reported weekly finds were found by the Strip Search Machines. I believe the public has a right to know if our tax dollars are being used wisely and I certainly question the effectiveness of the WBI.

As far as the pictures posted each week we know that Bob reused some pictures all while claiming the items were found during the week of the recap.. When a lack of integrity has been displayed questions are sure to arise. The questions are Bob's doing, no one else.

GSOLTSO said...

Anon sez - "Does TSA collect and share demographic data on the individuals caught concealing weapons in carryon luggage?"

I have not seen this published in the context you are mentioning. I have seen raw data numbers at the end of each year pertaining to specific types of items, locations, and some other assorted statistics. As of this time, I have not been notified that we are specifically keep demographics on people attempting to conceal weapons in their carryon luggage.

West
TSA Blog Team

Anonymous said...

The fact that you don't get why the photos are important, when the reason is explained right there in the comment, is part of the problem.

I'm going to disagree. The photos have absolutely no relevance. I know what a gun looks like. If I hear that 21 hand guns were found, I know what a hand gun looks like. The only thing the pictures do is give complainers and nay sayers another thing to whine about.

RB said...

Is the TSA Blog going to add more staff now that Lynn is officially not a blog team member? Maybe someone who actually does something?

Private Flight Frank said...

Crazy that people think they can get through with stuff like that. I guess common sense is not a given when flying anymore LOL

Fix the TSA said...

Haha, Bold TSApologist. Now you say photos posted by a government employee on a government website that are misleading and inaccurate have "absolutely no relevance."

Your government check must be very large to not care how much money is wasted and misused by the TSA.

Fix the TSA said...

Does anyone else find it interesting how dismissive Bold TSApologist is of Bob, and yet her comments are always posted?

Fix the TSA said...

WEST - where is my reply to TSAnonymous of June 19, 9:35am?

Fix the TSA said...

West, two of my most recent comments - in reply to a TSAnonymous and Falcon-One, met blog policy, but were deleted.

Why? Who deleted them?

SSSS for some reason said...

".. The photos have absolutely no relevance. I know what a gun looks like"

True. The photos are of no significance and we all know what firearms look like.

What IS significant is the weekly lies promoted by the TSA...

."All of the firearms pictured were discovered last week. "

Which has been demonstrated many times to be untrue. If the TSA is telling lies about something so simple as photos, what other lies are they propagating against the traveling public?

Fix the TSA said...

West,

Does a nudie scanner false positive alarm on someone's back shoulder mean that a screener must run his hands repeatedly up and down all over an innocent passenger's back? Is that what you would do? The alarm was on the shoulder, no where else.

Makes my skin crawl, just thinking about it.

Fix the TSA said...

West, please provide links or other information about the enhanced groin search - frequency, method, "reason", etc. The enhanced groin search started in January 2016. (I've asked for this information before.)

Thanks in advance.

GSOLTSO said...

RB sez - "Is the TSA Blog going to add more staff now that Lynn is officially not a blog team member?"

I have not heard of that happening, as of this moment.

Fix sez - "WEST - where is my reply to TSAnonymous of June 19, 9:35am?"

I have not seen it.

Fix sez - "Does a nudie scanner false positive alarm on someone's back shoulder mean that a screener must run his hands repeatedly up and down all over an innocent passenger's back?"

TSA does not have a piece of equipment called a "nudie scanner".

West
TSA Blog Team

Anonymous said...

Sorry TSOs Burns and West for getting the usual lineup riled up this week. I read this Blog every week as part of my job. No RB, Wintermute, and Fix the TSA--I'm not employed by TSA or DHS. Thanks to you TSA guys for getting us the information and sorry you have to take the abuse. Seeing what other airports are finding helps us be prepared should a passenger bring something they're not supposed to. My decision making process is much better when I've thought through the scenario before.

Fix the TSA said...

West, you know exactly what piece of failed technology I'm referring to as "nudie scanner". Many people have used similar terminology for the past almost seven years on this blog, and everyone, including you, know exactly what waste of tax dollars we mean.

You could simply have answered the question, using the regular name for it, but instead you are (again) attempting to deflect and (again) not reply to legitimate questions by the flying public.

Just answer the question, West.

Yes, I am reporting your non-answer to higher-ups.

Thanks (again) in advance.

Mike Toreno said...

Clerk West, the TSA does not have a piece of equipment that you call a "nudie scanner," but you do have a piece of equipment that is generally called a nudie scanner and that actually is a nudie scanner. But let's make it simpler for you. Does any false positive alarm, by any device, on someone's back, mean that screener must run his hands repeatedly up and down all over an innocent passenger's back?

Anonymous said...

Wow, everyone here is worried about some pictures. It seems all guns are one of a kind. Even if they are stock photos it doesn't mean that a certain gun was not caught. The report could have been sent without a photo of the gun. The photos are for illustration purposes. I don't understand. Some of you complain about the failure rate of covert testing and at the same time don't want a form of screening. The person has to be cleared. Well that's my opinion which probably means nothing to some of you who are so close minded with anything having to do with TSA.

Oh I forgot ..... SCREENSHOT ....

Susan Richart said...

"Anonymous said...

Sorry TSOs Burns and West for getting the usual lineup riled up this week. I read this Blog every week as part of my job. No RB, Wintermute, and Fix the TSA--I'm not employed by TSA or DHS. Thanks to you TSA guys for getting us the information and sorry you have to take the abuse. Seeing what other airports are finding helps us be prepared should a passenger bring something they're not supposed to. My decision making process is much better when I've thought through the scenario before."

1. Bob Burn is not a TS"O".

2. Sorry, but I find it extremely difficult that anyone has a job that relies on the "information" in this blog in order to be able to accomplish that job.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

john gury said...

That hatchet is really impressive. Don't tell me: 'Oh, I'm playing the lead in "The Lizze Borden Story" and this is a theatrical prop!'

Friend said...

I support legal carry but really people, If the firearm is in your baggage it isn't because you forgot it was there... you put it there! (Unless maybe you have a pissed off spouse?)

Anonymous said...

Clerk West, the TSA does not have a piece of equipment that you call a "nudie scanner," but you do have a piece of equipment that is generally called a nudie scanner and that actually is a nudie scanner. But let's make it simpler for you. Does any false positive alarm, by any device, on someone's back, mean that screener must run his hands repeatedly up and down all over an innocent passenger's back?

how would an officer know the passenger was innocent (though innocents implies they have both been charged and gone through a trial or at the very least, accused of committing a crime.) unless they perform a patdown?
I never knew a patdown determined innocence or guilt. I always thought it was to determine if there was a prohibited item there.

Wintermute said...

Who wants no form of screening? Show me where anyone has said that.

Wintermute said...

Actually, in this country, innocence is the presumed state of everyone. TSA flips that and presumes everyone is guilty, which is why many of us have so many issues with them.

Anonymous said...

"how would an officer know the passenger was innocent (though innocents implies they have both been charged and gone through a trial or at the very least, accused of committing a crime.) unless they perform a patdown?"

Oh, this one's easy. The naked body scanners have a 100% false positive rate, to any alarm is by definition a false one, which means the passenger must be innocent.

Maybe TSA should try using technology that works?

Anonymous said...

You could simply have answered the question, using the regular name for it, but instead you are (again) attempting to deflect and (again) not reply to legitimate questions by the flying public.

Just answer the question, West.

Yes, I am reporting your non-answer to higher-ups.
you could simply act like an adult and call the machine what it really is called. Just an option. If one wishes to be taken serious, they must first present themselves as serious. Otherwise they are taken as a joke and often ignored.

Anonymous said...

Actually, in this country, innocence is the presumed state of everyone. TSA flips that and presumes everyone is guilty, which is why many of us have so many issues with them.

well, not really. TSA is acting on alarms in most cases. At that point they have a reason to investigate further. innocents or guilt are not questioned at any point. Plus all passengers are submitting to screening when they enter the checkpoint. It is completely 100% voluntary.

Fix the TSA said...

West, you haven't answered my or Mike's questions yet.

Fix the TSA said...

West, why was Boldy's attack reply to Anonymous of July 3, 2016 at 10:52am allowed?

Beyond the grammatical errors, she is speaking for you and Bob as to why you refuse to answer questions posted by the taxpaying public.

Does Boldy speak for you, West?

Fix the TSA said...

Boldy, your reply to Wintermute is so funny. You're saying TSA screeners are nothing but Pavlovian dogs reacting to the beeps and flashing lights of failed technology? You must not think much of screeners.

And no, going through TSA's invasive and intrusive and privacy-violating procedures is NOT "100% voluntary."

Wintermute said...

Actually, you questioned innocence in your very comment.

Fix the TSA said...

Bob, after further analysis of the "Guns 26.3-12---9.JPG" montage photo, I see that you covered up the Date and Checkpoint information written by the screener on the bottom row, leftmost photo from Houston.

You hid the date, Bob. Why?


(Seriously, Bob, do you know how to name a file that follows HTML coding rules?)