Friday, May 13, 2016

TSA Week in Review: May 6th - 12th - 68 Firearms Discovered (58 Loaded)

Discovered 68 firearms

Sixty-eight firearms were discovered this week in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 68 firearms discovered, 58 were loaded and 27 had a round chambered. All of the firearms pictured were discovered last week. See a complete list below.

Discovered a replica grenade

If an item looks like a real bomb, grenade, mine, etc., it is prohibited. When these items are found at a checkpoint or in checked baggage, they can cause significant delays because the explosives detection professionals must respond to resolve the alarm. Even if they are novelty items, you are prohibited from bringing them on board the aircraft. The replica grenade pictured here was discovered in a carry-on bag this week at Denver (DEN).

Discovered knives
All of these prohibited items were discovered this week in a traveler's carry-on bag at LaGuardia (LGA).
Discovered two cane swords

Two cane swords were discovered this week in carry-on property at (L-R) Phoenix (PHX) and Baltimore (BWI).

Discovered knives
Clockwise from the top, these knives were discovered at: ORD, ORF, DTW, PHX and ORF


In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly in carry-on bags, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons, stun guns, small pocketknives and many other prohibited items too numerous to note.


Discovered ammunition
When packed properly, ammunition can be transported in your checked baggage, but it is never permissible to pack ammo in your carry-on bag. The ammunition pictured here was discovered this week in a carry-on bag at BWI.


Table for discovered firearms in carry-on bags list
You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline.


Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $11,000. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions; that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates.

Read our 2015 Year in Review post! If you haven’t read them yet, make sure you check out our year in review posts for 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014.

Follow @TSA on Twitter and Instagram!

Bob Burns
TSA Social Media Team
 

33 comments:

Anonymous said...

As always, absolutely nothing you needed your slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners to detect. Meanwhile, how many people suffered physical searches thanks to false alarms on these useless machines?

Why are Curtis Burns and West Cooper unwilling to address, let alone answer, that question?

How many weeks has it been since you last trumpeted something dangerous you found with the naked body scanners?

RB said...

We should be thankful for our highly trained professional TSA workforce. Just imagine how bad our airport security checkpoints would be otherwise what with the TSA professionals causing screening delays for 10's of thousands of travelers resulting in missed flights and other delays.

Anonymous said...

".. All of the firearms pictured were discovered last week..."

No. You are recycling photos again. Still. If you can't get this one little thing right how are we supposed to trust you with the big things?

John Burland said...

Well done for finding 60 or so dangerous objects last week. While that might be the benchmark that you think is relevant, it;s not. The relevant benchmark is finding these objects AND ensuring that your customers i.e. the traveling public are processed in an efficient manner.
Why has TSA NEVER looked at Best Practice at overseas airports? Why has TSA NEVER introduced roller belts to facilitate the smooth movement of hand luggage? Why has TSA NEVER invested in automated systems to ensure that trays are available in adequate quantities for passengers? Why has TSA NEVER created adequate signage, relying instead on drill instructors shouting endlessly at customers?

I could go on....

Anonymous said...

Rough month eh

CliffOnTheRoad said...

I would like to see two changes to this blog.
First, make the Anonymous circle choice include the ISP.
Second, to have the comments visible upon entry to the blog instead of making a person click-to-read

Reasons for the first are that it allows any response to be directed more (anon vs anon-123-456-789-012, and second that it unmasks someone whose job it is to appear as Joe Public.

The reason for the second one is some of the comments are very important and IMO it is a disservice to hide them from someone wanting to know more about the TSA's efforts to keep us safe.

Without the two items, the appearance is the TSA only wants to exhitib how good they are doing, and not hardly interested in making things better.

CliffOnTheRoad said...

To Anonomus of last week, yes I found the place describing how to get explosives on board a plane (which I will not do, nor even share here.) The professional bad guys I am sure would do their homework, although I wish they never leave home.

Either from what the higher-ups are saying OR the power of the press, the body scanners have been touted as bomb detectors. (reference upon request.) Every bomb is a foreign object but not every foreign object is a bomb.

If the situation in Phoenix is so bad, and the story says it is going to get worse, there could be some real solutions proposed through this channel, if the TSA uses it more than just a Public Relations front for a way for the public to vent (and hopefully? go away.)

Writing the TSA directly might do some good, but somehow I get the impression that any correstponce is just lost. Letters to the President, as an example, are read by someone (boy I wish I knew the volume they get) but he is shown only ten daily. Ny personal sending of a legit EPA violation and another on Medicare fraud went unacted upon even though both had documentation accompy.

Nothing hurts more than wanting to and being able to help yet being ignored.

Anonymous said...

Did you find any of these items at the 252 campaign events you sent screeners to or just the airports? Why exactly are you staffing campaign events while lines at the airports just get longer?

Anonymous said...

RB--so it's the TSA's fault when passengers show up to the airport 15-20 minutes prior to scheduled takeoff time also? Yes, it does happen, and I've seen it with my own eyes. I think they have warned everyone of the delays--so when does it become the passenger's fault?

Anonymous said...

Nice, I bet none of these would have been detected in the past right? right?...
So what is the number of terrorists caught since TSA inception? 200?, 100? um 50? oh ZERO?

Anonymous said...

The security lines and wait times at US airports are unacceptable. Why are European airports able to screen passengers so much more quickly and efficiently? Their flights are just as safe as ours. I think you could give the Pre Check level of screening to most passengers and be just as safe. It is risk based security and virtually all passengers are not risks.

RB said...

Looks like TSA takes care of this blog about the same way as TSA runs checkpoints. Both barely and poorly.

Anonymous said...

We should be thankful for our highly trained professional TSA workforce. Just imagine how bad our airport security checkpoints would be otherwise what with the TSA professionals causing screening delays for 10's of thousands of travelers resulting in missed flights and other delays.
Don't blame TSA for the delays. People including yourself complained when TSA had poor test results. They are now making changes to insure screening is more effective. The focus now is on security not customer service. But it appears people now want to complain that TSA is doing their job even better than before. You can t have it both ways. So add more effective security to increased flights, increase in passengers, increase in carry on bags and you are going to have longer wait times. Bummer, deal with it. It is not all the fault of TSA, if any fault at all.

Anonymous said...

Hey those lines would move a lot faster if people would stop bringing crap with them that they can't bring on a plane

Susan Richart said...

"Don't blame TSA for the delays. People including yourself complained when TSA had poor test results. They are now making changes to insure screening is more effective."

Hey, Boldy, just how safe are all those long lines that TSA has created? They make sitting ducks out of passengers for anyone so inclined to create chaos.

sreen shot/DHS OIG statement

Anonymous said...

"Hey those lines would move a lot faster if people would stop bringing crap with them that they can't bring on a plane"

Like ostomy bags?

Like breast prosthetics?

Like insulin pumps?

Like pleats and plackets on clothing?

Hey, would the lines move a lot faster if TSA stopped using technology that thinks private and harmless medical devices are dangerous?

RB said...

Anonymous Anonymous said...
RB--so it's the TSA's fault when passengers show up to the airport 15-20 minutes prior to scheduled takeoff time also? Yes, it does happen, and I've seen it with my own eyes. I think they have warned everyone of the delays--so when does it become the passenger's fault?

May 16, 2016 at 10:06 AM

.....................................
Not at all but it is TSA's fault directly when TSA Security lines back up 1,2, or more hours.

TSA defines Incompetence.

RB said...

Anonymous Anonymous said...

Don't blame TSA for the delays. People including yourself complained when TSA had poor test results. They are now making changes to insure screening is more effective. The focus now is on security not customer service. But it appears people now want to complain that TSA is doing their job even better than before. You can t have it both ways. So add more effective security to increased flights, increase in passengers, increase in carry on bags and you are going to have longer wait times. Bummer, deal with it. It is not all the fault of TSA, if any fault at all.

May 18, 2016 at 7:37 PM
.......................
TSA has not only earned the blame for these delays TSA is responsible for the delays. No one or nothing else.

Teresa Harner said...

Your response has incorrect data.Those full body scanners were taken out almost three years ago. An avatar image us used to show alarms. You have the ability to see this when you exit. Please get it right if your going to slander...

Anonymous said...

Nice, I bet none of these would have been detected in the past right? right?...
So what is the number of terrorists caught since TSA inception? 200?, 100? um 50? oh ZERO?

Can you please refer to anything where it states the function of TSA is to "catch Terrorists?"

Someone technically is not a terrorist until they commit the act, generally they are then dead. Its isn't like its a job description.

The more accurate question is how many terrorist have carried out an attack on an American based flight. To that the answer is zero.

Anonymous said...

The security lines and wait times at US airports are unacceptable. Why are European airports able to screen passengers so much more quickly and efficiently? Their flights are just as safe as ours. I think you could give the Pre Check level of screening to most passengers and be just as safe. It is risk based security and virtually all passengers are not risks.

you mean places like Paris? Didn't a plane that left there crash recently?

Anonymous said...

"you mean places like Paris? Didn't a plane that left there crash recently?"

Donald Trump, nice to see you here.

Anonymous said...

"Those full body scanners were taken out almost three years ago."

Not exactly, Teresa. The scanners in place today look at the naked body but translate that naked body to an avatar.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
The security lines and wait times at US airports are unacceptable. Why are European airports able to screen passengers so much more quickly and efficiently? Their flights are just as safe as ours. I think you could give the Pre Check level of screening to most passengers and be just as safe. It is risk based security and virtually all passengers are not risks. 
......
you mean places like Paris? Didn't a plane that left there crash recently?May 21, 2016 at 4:26 PM
............
So you know something about that flight and why the plane went down? Seems like the FBI would want to speak with you.

RB said...

Teresa Harner said...Your response has incorrect data.Those full body scanners were taken out almost three years ago. An avatar image us used to show alarms. You have the ability to see this when you exit. Please get it right if your going to slander...May 21, 2016 at 12:15 PM
.......................
Same MMW WBI as three years sgo. ATR was added but the core machine still scans the full body, has the ability to store image data, and the ability to transmit thst image data to other computers.

The only machines removed were the Backscatter X-Ray Whole Body Imagers.

Greg said...

I don't get that people are making negative comments about the body scanners. TSA is finding loaded guns in carry-on's, which I am happy to see. Why anyone would bring these into an airport, let alone try to board with them, is beyond me. Admittedly, the majority of these instances are honest mistakes, but who wants to be sitting next to these people on a plane that have no regard for the rules designed to protect everyone.

Fix the TSA said...

@ Teresa Harner - You're a TSA screener, correct?

Millimeter wave scanners still take and store data that can generate a naked image of the person.

Know the machinery you use.

Fix the TSA said...

Boldy, you know that the TSA admitted in court that terrorists aren't trying to use US planes for attacks. The TSA hasn't stopped anyone because they weren't even trying in the first place!

And as of May 22, 2016 at 4:26pm Eastern, Boldy, the reason for the EgyptAir crash of last week has not been determined.

Anonymous said...


you mean places like Paris? Didn't a plane that left there crash recently?


I remember that crash. And I remember all the cries of terrorist shortly afterwards. It 'might' have been terrorist but it also 'might' have been a suicidal pilot and it 'might' have been a couple of other things too.

So you might have a terrorist act for your example but you didn't explain how anything the TSA did, does, or plans on doing, could have prevented it.

Wintermute said...

Because, Greg, WTMDs find the same guns more quickly, and don't have a giant blind spot. It is trivial to sneak items past the AIT machines, unless they randomly alarm on something else.

Wintermute said...

I see now how you get your inflated numbers of terror attacks. Plane crashes, it's automatically terrorism even though no news sources report it as such, and no one has claimed responsibility. What other non-related events do you include?

Anonymous said...

"I don't get that people are making negative comments about the body scanners."

They're slow, invasive, and ineffective, and 100% of their alarms are false positives; replace them with WTMDs and most of the backups will go away, and no one will be any less safe.

Wintermute said...

Unless you redefine "false positive" like some TSApologists do :/