Friday, May 6, 2016

@AskTSA Travel Tips In Over 140 Characters: E-cigarettes and Other Nicotine Delivery Systems



E-cigarette
We see a lot of questions at @AskTSA about e-cigarettes, vape-pens and other nicotine delivery systems, such as the tweet below:

AskTSA Tweet: I've read that vaping E cigs are not allowed on planes, but what about carrying them in my carry-on or pant pocket?


These devices are permitted on planes, but the FAA recently notified airlines that the lithium batteries used in these devices are fire hazards and should not be packed in checked baggage.



According the FAA: These devices are battery powered and have a heating element that vaporizes liquid (that may or may not contain nicotine).

  • These devices are prohibited in checked baggage and may only be carried in the aircraft cabin (in carry-on baggage or on your person).
  • They may not be used or charged on the aircraft.
  • When a carry-on bag is checked at the gate or planeside, all electronic cigarette and vaping devices, along with any spare lithium batteries, must be removed from the bag and kept with the passenger in the aircraft cabin.

E-cigarettes

If your device does not have a lithium battery, you may pack it in either you checked or carry-on bag.



As far as the liquid used with these devices, they are permitted through security in carry-on bags if they comply with the 3-1-1 policy for liquids. 3-1-1 = 3.4 oz containers or less that fit in a quart-size, zip top, clear plastic bag (one bag per person) and placed in the screening bin.



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AskTSA Icon
If you’re scratching your head and wondering what @AskTSA is, it’s a small team of TSA professionals from various agency offices who answer TSA related questions from the traveling public that are sent via Twitter. You can read more about the program in this recent USA Today article.

If you have any TSA related travel questions, please send a tweet to our @AskTSA team. They’re available to answer your questions, 8 a.m.- 10 p.m., Eastern Time, weekdays; 9 a.m. -7 p.m., weekends/holidays. Travelers may also reach out to the TSA Contact Center. The Contact Center (TCC) hours are Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. – 11 p.m., Eastern Time; weekends and federal holidays, 9 a.m. – 8 p.m., Eastern Time. The TCC can be reached at 866-289-9673. Passengers can also reach out to the TSA Contact Center with questions about TSA procedures, upcoming travel or to provide feedback or voice concerns. 

Follow @TSA on Twitter and Instagram! 

Bob Burns
TSA Social Media Team
 

13 comments:

Anne said...

Need a Family/Infant Policy
You need a special policy for families traveling with infants.
It is a hardship for families traveling with infants to stand in line for two hours. Yet that is the expectation, and if families allot less than two hours time for the TSA line, they risk missing their flights.
Please note that airlines typically allow families with infants to board first, knowing that travel with infants is difficult. TSA should recognize families the same way.
TSA agents have the authority to detain people at will, so why do they not have the authority to use their judgment in easing the hardship and allowing families with infants to move up in the line when it is unusually long?

Anonymous said...

What about butane-catalytic vaping devices, such as the IOLITE?

Jeff Berard said...

Can you bring a portable umbrella in your carry on bag through TSA?

Wintermute said...

Actually, the TSA has no more authority to detain someone than you or I, as they are not Law Enforcement Officers. They have violated individuals' rights and detained them, regadless, though.

Anonymous said...

May I put swiss-army knives in my checked baggage?

Murphy said...

Is there any restrictions on gold and silver in your carry-on?

Fix the TSA said...

West, the May 15 comment here was not approved until several days after it was submitted. No one else before May 15 made any comments at all on this post?

Anonymous said...


I was at the McCarran Airport in Las Vegas to return to LAX just this Friday, May 20th. Prior to entering the boarding gate, a TSA officer asked if I had a valid ID because my driver's license had expired. My husband and I explained that I did not pass my driver's license written test for the renewal so I did not have a new one. He then called a supervisor who again interrogated me and we then told him that I did not have any problem when I used the same ID from LAX coming into Vegas. He said that I could still get in but just when we thought everything was fine, another supervisor approached us and again interrogated and asked me if I had any valid ID. I reiterated that I did not have one and she then asked if I had any credit card. I showed two credit cards but she still decided to do a second screening wherein I was subjected to a body and bag search. When my husband requested if he could go with me since he is my husband, she gave him a snarly response saying that we had to go separately. This seems a little excessive. Also, I am wondering, does TSA really treat credit cards as valid forms of ID?

JenaBri said...

What about makeup? I know toothpaste, hair sirums, body wash, deodorant, etc goes by the 3-1-1 & should be in your personal or carry on.... what about a little makeup bag? Am I supposed to pack my foundation in the clear 311 bag or can leave it in with my makeup?

Unknown said...

Do my prescription meds have to be in their original containers? That can be a lot of containers.

Mona Hawkins said...

Do my prescription meds have to be in their original containers? That can be a lot of containers.

Fix the TSA said...

West, why was the Anonymous of May 22, 2016 at 10:36 PM denied the opportunity for her husband to be a witness to the secondary screening? TSA SOP says any passenger subjected to secondary screening is allowed to have someone accompany them to witness the search.

Josh Bgaming said...

FYI
60ml bottle is 2.029 ounces
Keep your tank, mod, juice bottle, ect. separated and in bags if you need to (leaking)
Treat your batteries the same way you treat a laptop during screening.