Friday, April 15, 2016

TSA Week in Review: April 8th - 14th

Discovered 58 firearms image

Fifty-eight firearms were discovered this week in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 58 firearms discovered, 49 were loaded and 20 had a round chambered. All of the firearms pictured were discovered last week. See a complete list below.

Discovered knucle knife image
This folding knuckle knife was discovered in a carry-on bag at ORD.
Discovered ammunition image

When packed properly, ammunition can be transported in your checked baggage, but it is never permissible to pack ammo in your carry-on bag. This ammunition was discovered in a carry-on bag at CID.



In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly in carry-on bags, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons, stun guns, small pocketknives and many other prohibited items too numerous to note.

Table for discovered firearms in carry-on bags list

You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline.
 

Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $11,000. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions; that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.
 
*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates.

Read our 2015 Year in Review post! If you haven’t read them yet, make sure you check out our year in review posts for 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014.


Follow @TSA on Twitter and Instagram!
 
Bob Burns
TSA Social Media Team
 

43 comments:

Anonymous said...

As always, absolutely nothing you needed your slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners to detect. Meanwhile, how many people suffered physical searches thanks to false alarms on these useless machines?

Why are Curtis Burns and West Cooper unwilling to address, let alone answer, that question?

How many weeks has it been since you last trumpeted something dangerous you found with the naked body scanners?

RB said...

What is the cause of TSA screening slowdowns that are being reported all across the country? Just general TSA incompetence or an intentional act by TSA. If Neffenger can't do the job then he should be removed.

$8 Million per Year for a 5th rate TSA!

Anonymous said...

Doesn't seem as if TSA is finding any more guns in spite of deliberately holding up lines causing passengers to miss flights.

screen shot

Anonymous said...

"...Fifty-eight firearms were discovered this week in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 58 firearms discovered, 49 were loaded and 20 had a round chambered. All of the firearms pictured were discovered last week. "

No, the pictures are not from the firearms you discovered last week. At least three of them have been used in the last couple of months.

If you are lying about something so simple as a photo, how many other things is your organization lying about?

Anonymous said...

Is there a resource that wait times for TSA screening checkpoints can be determined?

Asked this question at @AskTSA but they apparently didn't think the question deserved a response.

Fix the TSA said...

No comments approved since April 12th. It is now April 18th. No notice from the blog team that comments will be delayed by a week or more.

What's going on? Why won't Curtis Burns, Lynn Dean, West Cooper, and "several "HQ elements" approve comments on this blog in a timely manner?

RB said...

I have to assume that this is the screening method taught by TSA and that the TSA Managers at this airport are ok with this type of behavior.

Maybe TSA needs to take a few steps back and reevaluate what is actually going on in our airports.

TSA Professionalism On Display

TSOScreener said...

TSA did have what you people call naked body scanners and screeners would view images. But now the images produced are of gingerbread type not showing any actual body parts. Screeners can only see images produced by the scanners after the algorithm displays something not to be standard or normal on a human body. Every now and then the scanner does have false alarms. To be clear I don't consider keys, wallet, coins,and any item left on one's person a false alarm. I don't believe the algorithm can determine what object is inside a person's pocket. The alarmed area has to be cleared. Also to be clear not all airports report items found to this blog. The airport I work at has found items that would have cleared a metal detector. One such item was a carbon fiber type knife, another which may not sound to be dangerous was a bottle of rubbing alcohol around the ankle area.
I wonder why some people hate TSA so much and focus their anger towards the screeners. They are just following policies. Please don't compare that to "just following orders" like the Nazis did. It is not even remotely close. If it was, we wouldn't enjoy the freedoms we have.
And yes, I am a screener. I do hate the term officer and don't consider myself one. I dislike the metal badge, it's another thing to be responsible for. I know we are not law enforcement. But I do believe I deserve to be treated with respect. I thank the people that fly because without them I would not have a job. I appreciate it when they thank me and my fellow coworkers. I do believe I am keeping them safe. Unlike other agencies that can let undocumented aliens through, drugs into our streets. With TSA one act of terrorism is all it takes. It may not happen tomorrow, next year, or ten years from now, but when it does, I hope we are able to prevent it.

RB said...

TSOScreener said.........

Thanks for your post. At least you admit who your employer is. If you've followed this blog then you know that I'm highy critical of TSA with good reason in my mind. Now on to your comments.

The Whole Body Imager is the same exact MMW machine with two changes. Removal of the Remote Viewing Room and addition of the Automatic Threat Dectector (Gumby Image Screen). The underlying machine retains the capability of transmitting and saving the raw image that is later processed through the algorithm. I alarm the Whole Body Imager each and every time I pass through but it is my neck area that seems to be the issue. No implants, surgeries or other issues so that is a false alarm. Given that TSA can legally only search for WEI searches that alarm on sweat, paper, keys, or what have you exceeds TSA authority. That is why Whole Body Imagers fail, the search is too broad. Then the matter of the Whole Body Imagers being slow is a primary reason for the backups at checkpoints. That in itself is a security concern that TSA has not addressed.

You ask why people hate TSA. Take a look at the video linked in the post just before yours. Is that how a professional acts? Or how about the screener who tried to steal my wifes jewlery and when reported was covered up bt the FLL FSD. I should like or trust any TSA employee after that?

Following policies that you know in your heart are wrong makes you as bad as the person creating those policies. Abusing elderly, young, or others is wrong but seem a specialty of TSA. At least have the backbone to walk away. And yes that is where the comparrison with certain historical groups comes from. TSA screeners have worked very hard to earn the reputation you have, you reap what you sow.

But on a bright point we agree that the faux cop uniform and badge is a wrong but you just don't want to be responsible for keeping up with the badge, I on the other hand believe its sends a negative message.

How about one question? What is behind the recent severe lenghty waits at many TSA checkpoints? Orders from on high?

Wintermute said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Roman Hudson said...

Hello there. I have read one thong or another on the questions I have by people. But I am a guy that would rather get the information from the horses mouth. So, I have 2 questions. #1 I have a metal plate, 8 screws, and a stainless steel hip in my body. (And I am only 39. Get off them cell phones while behind the wheel PLEASE.) Anyway, I do have a card from my doctor that I carry in my wallet just in case I do set off a security device. The airport I am leaving from has a body scanner. I know it will show up. Should I call ahead and tell people? #2. I also have 3 body piercings on my body. Will they have to be removed? They are pretty tough to do so in a check-line since they are in a sensitive area. Thank you for any answers you guys can give me. It is my second time flying in my life and I am going to my college graduation so I do not want to miss it.

RB said...

Roman Hudson said........

Don't expect any answers from these TSA employees.

TSOScreener said...

RB,
Don't believe everything you read in the news especially if it's biased. Some stories are exaggerated and sometimes they just plain lie. I speak from experience (not TSA but personal). They write what sales.

Any item left in a pocket is not a false alarm. Paper, keys, and other objects need to be cleared of being WEI. Explosive components come in all sizes, large and small. I do agree when there is nothing it is a false alarm but the area still needs to be cleared.

The long lines are because of the high turnover rate and not being able to replace screeners. Small and big airports are low on staffing and the only ones to blame are TSA management.

Thank you for having an open mind about TSA. That's the only way to fix the agency.

The video was funny but sad to see how that guy just snapped. People think this job is not stressful but it is.

RB said...

REports from around the country saying TSA Checkpoints are swamped with travelers and TSA has limited resources.

is it because TSA is out doing security at political events which is not the responsibility of TSA? Not even a government responsibility.

TSA Takes On Political Event Duties

Anonymous said...

I must have linked to the wrong video RB--I didn't have problem with what the TSA guy was saying. If anything, he was trying to get people through quicker. Sounds like he was trying to be part of the solution and not part of the problem by making the instructions clear. And once again, no I'm not TSA, but I still disagree with your comments.

Anonymous said...

Amazing that TSA bloggers can't even coordinate between themselves a regular comment posting schedule.

Look up the work Incompetence and the letters TSA are the first definition.

RB said...

TSOScreener said...RB,Don't believe everything you read in the news especially if it's biased. Some stories are exaggerated and sometimes they just plain lie. I speak from experience (not TSA but personal). They write what sales.Any item left in a pocket is not a false alarm. Paper, keys, and other objects need to be cleared of being WEI. Explosive components come in all sizes, large and small. I do agree when there is nothing it is a false alarm but the area still needs to be cleared. The long lines are because of the high turnover rate and not being able to replace screeners. Small and big airports are low on staffing and the only ones to blame are TSA management.Thank you for having an open mind about TSA. That's the only way to fix the agency.The video was funny but sad to see how that guy just snapped. People think this job is not stressful but it is. April 21, 2016 at 1:52 PM
?...............?

What stories? Stories written by TSA that are complete fabrications and have no semblance to the truth?

I have no idea what gives you the opinion that I have an open mind about TSA. I don't. That horse left the barn long ago. TSA and its employees gave proven to me time and time again to be less than honorable or honest. I have no idea how TSA could amass so many third rate employees.

The only way to fix TSA is to do away with the whole mess. TSA was a bad idea to start with and even worse in application. Besides, it is not a role of federal government to provide security to private business.

Susan Richart said...

Anonymous wrote:

"I must have linked to the wrong video RB--I didn't have problem with what the TSA guy was saying. If anything, he was trying to get people through quicker. Sounds like he was trying to be part of the solution and not part of the problem by making the instructions clear. And once again, no I'm not TSA, but I still disagree with your comments."

Let's allow a doctor to explain to why this person is a problem. In part:

"But this guy represents what I see so often (especially at O'Hare and Newark): complete inability to control emotions. This guy is sick; he needs help. It's not just that he's embarrassing himself and his employer, it's that he's in a fair amount of distress. He's genuinely furious that people might have Kleenex in their pockets. That's a loss of rational thinking."

http://www.flyertalk.com/forum/26501072-post16.html

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Roman Hudson said...

Ok, but will some answer my question. I am not interested in conspiracy theories or what a few bad apples in the TSA have done. But I would like to know these thing because this will be in a sense my first time fkying and I would like some genuine help. Thank you.

GSOLTSO said...

Roman Hudson sez - " (a bunch of questions about specifics that I can't really answer about security procedures and) Thank you for any answers you guys can give me. It is my second time flying in my life and I am going to my college graduation so I do not want to miss it.


We have processes in place that allow us to help you get through screening in all of the situations you mention in your comment. I can not go into specifics, but there are several options available to you, one of which is to contact TSA Cares at 1-855-787-2227 about 4-5 business days ahead of your trip and coordinate with them for assistance at your departure airport (this is the one that I recommend, as it provides the airport an opportunity to work with you ahead of time to address any special needs you may have). You could show up like most folks do and just try to wing it through, but if you do not wish to use TSA Cares, I recommend arriving a bit earlier than usual, to allow for additional screening that may be needed. I hope that you have a good trip, and please take advantage of TSA Cares, it has helped many people that have challenges with flying get through with as little effort as possible.

West
TSA Blog Team

Anonymous said...

TSOScreener , thanks for your input. You are a brave man trying to talk logic to the people who post here. You fail to understand, everyone here is a security expert and has all the answers. You are opening yourself up to a barrage of insults.
If left to those who post here, airplanes would be falling from the sky and they would tell us its just rain.

Anonymous said...

"If left to those who post here, airplanes would be falling from the sky and they would tell us its just rain."

It's funny you say that, since TSA has never stopped a terrorist, and plenty of countries have far less invasive and more professional screening techniques than TSA uses, yet have not had a single plane fall from the sky as a result.

It's almost as if the entire point of TSA is to keep people in a state of fear and panic or something!

Wintermute said...

I'm the only person here claiming to be a security expert, but even I defer to those with more expertise than myself, such as Bruce Schneier.

And the only people doing the insulting people are TSA's apologists. Posts that follow guidelines by detractors are frequently not allowed, while insults, specifically by our "bold" friend, are frequently allowed by TSA's apologists. Wanna try again?

Anonymous said...

"..If left to those who post here, airplanes would be falling from the sky and they would tell us its just rain."

Really? Why isn't that happening in all the parts of the world -not- protected by the TSA?

TSOScreener said...

Do you not read or watch the news or just choose ignore to make your statement true?

http://www.cnn.com/2015/11/18/middleeast/metrojet-crash-dabiq-claim/

Hating TSA does not mean you can post information that is not factual.

Wintermute said...

Perhaps you should read the article you linked to, as it points out one of the weaknesses that your higher-ups have been ignoring since the inception of the TSA - the insider threat. That threat is known to be real, as several of your colleagues have been arrested for accepting bribes to allow drugs on. Did they even confirm that what they were allowing were drugs? Or did they simply look the other way? Because if it's the latter, what's to stop a terrorist from posing as a drug smuggler in order to get their bombs on? What's to prevent the TSA from hiring a terrorist, for that matter? The reason TSA's employee background checks have been in the news over the years isn't because they were best-in-class, after all ;)

Wintermute said...

From the article: "So far no governments have commented about the ISIS claims." So, basically, ISIS claims responsibility, but this is not confirmed. At least, not by the article you link to. Try again?

Note: I'm not claiming no planes have been targets in other parts of the world, just that they're not raining from the skies, like your colleagues like to imply they would be if your employer didn't exist. Someone else made that claim, but your rebuttal is lacking.

Susan Richart said...

TSO screener: The following puts the kabosh on your comment above

"Security service investigators suspect someone with access to the aircraft's baggage compartment inserted an explosive device inside or on top of the luggage just before the plane took off."

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-34742273

It was not taken through a security checkpoint. TSA wouldn't be able to stop something like this happening at our airports.


screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Unknown said...

"It was not taken through a security checkpoint. TSA wouldn't be able to stop something like this happening at our airports."

They wouldn't be able to stop it if somebody carried it through the checkpoint balanced on the top of his head, because they are too busy looking for juice, water, and cupcakes, and arguing with passengers that NEXUS cards aren't valid ID.

Mike Toreno said...

"It was not taken through a security checkpoint. TSA wouldn't be able to stop something like this happening at our airports."

They wouldn't be able to stop it if somebody carried it through the checkpoint balanced on the top of his head, because they are too busy looking for juice, water, and cupcakes, and arguing with passengers that NEXUS cards aren't valid ID.

TSOScreener said...

@Wintermute
I was replying to Anonymous
"It's funny you say that, since TSA has never stopped a terrorist, and plenty of countries have far less invasive and more professional screening techniques than TSA uses, yet have not had a single plane fall from the sky as a result."

@Susan Richart
I know it was an insider threat,the same with the Somalia jetliner. I was trying to prove that it is happening and everyone needs to be keep an eye open. I know TSA or any security company will probably not be able to deter such an attack.

Wintermute said...

Yes, I know who you were replying to. Also, you just admitted that TSA would be useless in those situations...

I can tell you how to prevent the insider threat from happening here... Scan everyone every time they go in and out of the sterile area. This included TSAgents, or other contractors, at the screening gate, as well as aircraft mechanics and others who may have currently have unfettered access to aircraft. Use contractors for security, and rotate them out regularly.

TSOScreener said...

@Wintermute
I agree with you 100 percent. It's true TSA would be useless. I agree everyone should be screened but with TSA being a reactive agency it will take an insider threat to change things.
To tell you the truth, I agree with what you, RB, Susan Richart,and others say. But to a point. Getting rid of TSA will not fix things. There are airports ran by private security and they follow the same procedures as TSA. The federal government will still be involved if all airports were private.
I never flew before 9-11 so I don't know how security was back then. Times have changed and not for the good. We have individuals who like going to movie theaters, their place of work, schools to just shoot up the place. We might have more of a chance to get killed by an active shooter or car accident, like Susan said, then in a terrorist attack. But the risk is still there. Nowadays they(people with extreme ideals) don't care how many people they kill anymore. Even if it's just one person they've succeeded.

Like I said before I agree with you, and you have great ideas but we'll have see if TSA will implement those procedures.

Fix the TSA said...

Bob,

Is there a way for you to change the comments so they appear threaded, rather than posted chronologically? It gets confusing for many of us to follow exchanges between commenters, especially since so many post anonymously.

Wintermute said...

My point is not get rid of TSA. What I would like to see, whether done by TSA or private screening, is sane security practices. Most of what you do is pointless and exceeds the administrative search that is allowable under current case law. The AIT machines are completely useless, as they alarm not only on non-threat items, but on nothing at all. They have blind spots that lead to a 95% failure in testing. Whether those tests rely on insider knowledge or not, as our bold friend claims, is irrelevant. That just means that TSA is relying on security through obscurity, which is no security at all.

Finally, I would urge you to find employment elsewhere. Private security can be much more profitable and much more fulfilling if you find the right employer ;)

Wintermute said...

Fix, that's a function of Blogger and not really under the blog team's control unless they change platforms... But... Comments do appear to be threaded on the rare occation that someone replies directly to a comment instead of posting a new one... At least, that option is available in the mobile version. Not sure if the option to reply inline is available in the desktop version (I use the mobile version even when I'm on my desktop... I prefer the layout)

Fix the TSA said...

Wintermute, thank you for the information. I will try the mobile view on my desktop, which does offer a threaded view if people use the reply option.

Anonymous said...

TSO Screener, I think part of the problem with people's perceptions of the TSA is the simple fact that there is no indication that we are any safer, in spite of the huge increase in cost over the previous, private security arrangements.

Indeed, there is evidence tot he contrary in these very blog posts. Virtually every week we are treated to tales of all the dangerous weapons removed from flights. Since there is no change in the frequency of attacks of any kind in flight from the previous private screening regime, there are only two logical conclusions to be drawn. Either that the private screeners of a few years ago were just as adept at removing them as you folks resulting in no change in outcome, or they missed them all but those who carried them on never even attempted to use them.

The outcome, in any case is the same: there are no fewer attacks now than previously. There is, however, a massive bureaucracy at great expense. If it costs more and does nothing more, it's a waste of money.

None Ofyours said...

What do you mean when you say TSA has never stopped a terrorist?

Wintermute said...

Unfortunately people (in general) are fairly lazy creatures and won't change their habit to reply inline...

Roman Hudson said...

I think they have detered a lot of people from commuting acts of terror here in the US. And let me tell you, a few weeks ago I flew for the first time in my adult life and I am 39. The TSA officers I ran into in Orlando were nothin but courteous. They answered every question I had. I was signed up for TEA precheck so my experence going to Boston and coming back lasted a total of 8 minutes. That is how long I stood in line, went there metal detector, and the body scannner since my artificial hip set it off. This is round trip. I hope they are this post. I Thank them for their service

Wintermute said...

Just what I said. Terrorists are not targeting US commercial aviation. TSA can't stop something that isn't occurring.

Wintermute said...

Is that the new gold standard for testing whether your security is working? "I think it did, so it must have?"