Friday, April 29, 2016

TSA Week in Review: April 22nd - 28th - 58 Firearms, Powder Horn, Machetes and More

Discovered 58 firearms

Fifty-eight firearms were discovered this week in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 58 firearms discovered, 52 were loaded and 13 had a round chambered. All of the firearms pictured were discovered last week. See a complete list below.

Discovered black power

A powder horn full of black powder was discovered in a carry-on bag at Albuquerque (ABQ). Black powder and all other forms of gun powder are strictly prohibited in both carry-on and checked baggage.

Discovered a live M18 red smoke grenade

A live M18 red smoke grenade was discovered in a checked bag at Boise (BOI).

Discovered three machetes

Three machetes were discovered this week in carry-on bags in two separate incidents at Houston (IAH). Machetes must be packed in checked baggage.

Discovered knives
Clockwise from the top, these items were discovered at ORF, RIC, ORF, ORD, DTW, ORD and DTW


In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly in carry-on bags, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons, stun guns, small pocketknives and many other prohibited items too numerous to note.



Table for discovered firearms in carry-on bags list
You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline.






Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.



Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $11,000. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions; that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.



*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates.



Read our 2015 Year in Review post! If you haven’t read them yet, make sure you check out our year in review posts for 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014.



Follow @TSA on Twitter and Instagram!

22 comments:

Anonymous said...

As always, absolutely nothing you needed your slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners to detect. Meanwhile, how many people suffered physical searches thanks to false alarms on these useless machines?

Why are Curtis Burns and West Cooper unwilling to address, let alone answer, that question?

How many weeks has it been since you last trumpeted something dangerous you found with the naked body scanners?

Robert Sklar said...

Based on the published failure rate of 95% that means that TSA did NOT find the additional 1,160 items that passed undetected during the same time period.

Also what happens to all the firearms, are they sold, destroyed, what?

Fix the TSA said...

Bob, why did you publish another altered photo in the gun montage this week. This time it's a "sepia tone" on the bottom row, second from left. Did you change the color or did the screener? It appears the TSA doesn't take their job seriously when they take and publish "artsy" photos of items of which we're all supposed to be terrified.

Second row, first from right photo in the gun montage is cut off.

Last week, you called the gun montage photo "guns.jpg." This week, you call the gun montage photo "Capture.jpg." This again is too generic of a title to be useful in proper file management. I will say that this naming convention is better than the poorly named photos of the knives and hacksaw.

You use plus signs, commas, spaces, inconsistent capitalization, and many other HTML-unfriendly naming conventions:

abq+powder+horn.jpg
BOI+Pearce-bag.JPG (Who is Pearce?)
IAH+Machetes.JPG
Clock - ORF, RIC, ORF, ORD, DTW, ORF, DTW.JPG

Bob, have you ever taken a class on HTML or read an article about good file naming practices?

CliffOnTheRoad said...

Is it possible that if the body scanners were stopped that a bad person would try to bring a razor blade onto the aeroplane and fly to Cuba?
Is it possible that the highly paid employees of the TSA who advocate the glow-in-the-dark scanners are not concerned about changing what they have or do?
Is it possible that the elected representatives who support AND approve the millions of dollars for those devices (at the start anyway) do not bother to read these posts?
Is it possible that it would be better to get people to stand up against the dubeous practice and get some changes?
Is it possible that Anonymous someday picks a name to display here instead of Anonymous? It is only a text field anyway.

GSOLTSO said...

Robert Sklar sez - "Also what happens to all the firearms, are they sold, destroyed, what?"

Disposition of firearms that are discovered during the screening process is entirely up to the local LEOs that assume control of the item as soon as they can arrive.

West
TSA Blog Team

Browsing Around said...

Shouldn't the photos be dated also?

Browsing Around said...

Why not answer answer the rest of the questions, West?

Anonymous said...

West, how do you decide which questions you're going to answer? The firearms-confiscated-at-checkpoints question has been answered many times. The question about the false positive rate has never been answered by you or anyone else at TSA. Why is that?

RB said...

Been a good couple of weeks for TSA. Failing 9 out of 12 Red Team testsat MSP.

Abusing an Olympic athelete at Denver.

And again with breast milk at Phoenix.

I don't know what is wrong with TSA but whatever it is seems to run very deep across thd organization.

I woild suggest to any employees of TSA with any tiny bit of self redpect, get out now. TSA is toxic!

Susan Richart said...

Two complaints in two days about screeners demanding baby food/medically necessary liquids be disposed of or passengers will get a pat down. TSA policy says such will be tested or, if you refuse testing, then a pat down, but nothing about throwing such away.

Is this a new policy?

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Anonymous said...

Bob, why did you publish another altered photo in the gun montage this week. This time it's a "sepia tone" on the bottom row, second from left. Did you change the color or did the screener? It appears the TSA doesn't take their job seriously when they take and publish "artsy" photos of items of which we're all supposed to be terrified.

Second row, first from right photo in the gun montage is cut off.

Last week, you called the gun montage photo "guns.jpg." This week, you call the gun montage photo "Capture.jpg." This again is too generic of a title to be useful in proper file management. I will say that this naming convention is better than the poorly named photos of the knives and hacksaw.

You use plus signs, commas, spaces, inconsistent capitalization, and many other HTML-unfriendly naming conventions:

abq+powder+horn.jpg
BOI+Pearce-bag.JPG (Who is Pearce?)
IAH+Machetes.JPG
Clock - ORF, RIC, ORF, ORD, DTW, ORF, DTW.JPG

Bob, have you ever taken a class on HTML or read an article about good file naming practices?

I think they do it so you have something to do. To most people, it is irrelevant, but it has a purpose with you. Imagine how bored you would be...

Anonymous said...

Susan Richart said...
Two complaints in two days about screeners demanding baby food/medically necessary liquids be disposed of or passengers will get a pat down. TSA policy says such will be tested or, if you refuse testing, then a pat down, but nothing about throwing such away.

Is this a new policy?

this has been the policy for many years. When I traveled with my now almost teen age grandchildren, we went through the same thing. If they cant open it to test it, I got a pat down or I could surrender it to them for disposal. pretty simple.

Anonymous said...

West, how do you decide which questions you're going to answer? The firearms-confiscated-at-checkpoints question has been answered many times. The question about the false positive rate has never been answered by you or anyone else at TSA. Why is that?

I have read the answer, many times. People just refuse to accept it. There are no false positives. The machines are detecting something. be it a tic tac, a dime, or in cases I have seen, people with sweat on their backs. It is up to the officers to find out what it is. They are not designed to identify specific items. Thus it is not a false positive.

Wintermute said...

Did you not even read what Susan wrote?

Wintermute said...

That isa non-answer, as you are redefining what a false positive is. If your "answer" is correct, then TSA is looking for items beyond the scope of an administrative search.

Fix the TSA said...

Bold TSApologist, you have as much claim to know what "most people" think as you do to TSA procedures - none.

Making government employees and the American public aware of the false and misleading information, as well as the unprofessional actions and comments by government employees on this government website is important.

Waste of our tax dollars should not be taken lightly, especially when you directly benefit from it, Bold TSApologist.

I wish Bob didn't reuse photos.

I wish West, Bob, Lynn, and "HQ elements" didn't delete and delay citizens' comments on a government website.

I wish the TSA hadn't already wasted over $100,000,000,000 of US tax dollars on failed tech and intrusive procedures.

Until these issues are corrected, Americans must speak up everywhere possible and demand better.

Fix the TSA said...

Wintermute, of course Boldy didn't bother to read Susan's comment. Boldy's too busy being strangely upset by critical comments on a blog where she "doesn't work" and "doesn't know anyone".

Susan Richart said...

Wintermute wrote:

"Did you not even read what Susan wrote?"

Boldy read it but didn't understand it. Typical of TSA.

Anonymous said...

"I have read the answer, many times."

Then provide a link to just one of these "many times." I'll wait.

None Ofyours said...

I have posted here today to get information and learn about the process. I am amazed at the rude and nasty way certain people interactions are. Not as if anyone cares, just an observation. I don't care if you neverfind another red team item. The scoreboard is what mmatters. No planes have fallen out of the sky your watch.

Fix the TSA said...

@None ofyours : The TSA has wasted over $100,000,000,000 so far, while failing 95% of tests and using scanners that fail over 50% of the time.

It isn't the TSA that has kept terrorists from taking down US planes. Simply put, the terrorists aren't even trying to take down planes in the US.

And the TSA knew that simple fact years ago.

Yet they continue to waste $8,000,000,000 every year for security theater.

Anonymous said...

This is completely incorrect... I happen to be an officer, and those published tests were by people that work FOR us. They know ALL of the tricks to get things thru. That's their job. But think about it... Why would they expose that? I don't even believe those rates are that high. I think it's all a false failure rate published on purpose to milk more funding out of the government. Like I said, I would for TSA, and we don't miss things.