Thursday, March 10, 2016

@AskTSA Travel Tips In Over 140 Characters: Spring Break Travel Tips



A photo of a palm tree, ocean, and a plane fllying on the sky

With spring break underway, we’re starting to see a lot of questions like the one tweeted to our @AskTSA team below.

A screen capture of an @AskTSA message

To answer this specific tweet, all of the above are allowed in carry-on bags. 


Sunscreen, Bug Spray and Shampoo: These items fall under our 3-1-1 liquids rule. If you’re checking a bag, make your life simple by packing liquids in your checked baggage so you don’t have to worry about it. In your carry-on bags, you’re allowed to take as many 3.4 ounce or less containers that will fit in one sealed, clear, quart-sized zip-top bag – and one bag per person. Make sure you take the zip-top bag out of your carry-on prior to sending it through the X-ray.


Medication: It is not necessary to present your medication to, or notify an officer about any medication you are traveling with unless it is in liquid form. Medication in liquid form is allowed in carry-on bags in excess of 3.4 ounces in reasonable quantities for the flight. It is not necessary to place medically required liquids in a zip-top bag. However, you must tell the officer that you have medically necessary liquids at the start of the screening checkpoint process. Medically required liquids will be subjected to additional screening that could include being asked to open the container. You can bring your medication in pill or solid form in unlimited amounts as long as it is screened. Read more information about traveling with medication.
 

In addition to the question above, here is some other helpful information for passengers:

Prohibited Items: Use the “Can I Bring My…” tool to enter the item you want to pack. It will tell you whether you can pack it in your carry-on or checked bag. You may also refer to our prohibited items list. If you still can’t find the answer, reach out to our @AskTSA team via Twitter and they’ll get back to you right away with an answer. 


Beverages: Wine, liquor, beer and all of your favorite beverages are allowed in your checked baggage. You can also bring beverages packaged in 3.4 oz or less bottles in your carry-on bags in the 3-1-1 bag.

Makeup: Any liquid makeup cosmetics such as eyeliner, nail polish, liquid foundation, etc., should be placed in the baggie. That goes for perfume as well. Powder makeup is fine.

Deodorant: Stick deodorant is not limited to 3.4 oz or less, but gel or spray deodorant must follow the liquids rule.

Batteries: You can’t go anywhere without some kind of battery these days. Learn about what types of batteries are allowed.

Shaving Razors: Certain razors are permitted. Learn which ones you can fly with in this blog post
 
A photo image advertisment of TSA Precheck
TSA Pre®: Learn more about TSA Pre✓®,expedited security screening program connecting travelers departing from airports within the United States with smarter security and a better air travel experience. Accompanying family members ages 12 and under can be processed through expedited screening as well. 


TSA Cares Helpline: Call TSA Cares toll free at (855) 787-2227 if you or a family member with a disability or medical condition has questions about screening policies, procedures and what to expect at the security checkpoint 72 hours prior to traveling.


Forgotten or Lost IDs: If you have lost or forgotten your ID, you will still be permitted to fly as long as you help us verify you are who you say you are by answering a few questions.  



Traveling With Children: Did you know that children 12 and under can keep their shoes on? Read about the screening process and how to best pack for your child



Lose Something?: Contact the airport lost and found. It’s a good idea to tape your business card or contact info to your valuable electronics or other items. Not only does this help us contact you if you lose your items, it prevents travelers from grabbing the wrong item by mistake.



Arrival Time: It’s spring break time, you can expect lots of company in lines to get your boarding pass, check your bags and go through security screening. We recommend arriving two hours ahead of your scheduled departure. Giving yourself plenty of time to catch you flight ensures a great start to a fantastic vacation. Enjoy!





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Ask TSA icon
If you’re scratching your head and wondering what @AskTSA is, it’s a small team of TSA professionals from various agency offices who answer TSA related questions from the traveling public that are sent via Twitter. You can read more about the program in this recent USA Today article.

You may also wish to consult with your airline about any policies they may have regarding the item (s) you’d like to travel with.

If you have any TSA related travel questions, please send a tweet to our @AskTSA team. They’re available to answer your questions, 8 a.m.- 10 p.m., Eastern Time, weekdays; 9 a.m. -7 p.m., weekends/holidays. Travelers may also reach out to the TSA Contact Center. The Contact Center (TCC) hours are Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. – 11 p.m., Eastern Time; weekends and federal holidays, 9 a.m. – 8 p.m., Eastern Time. The TCC can be reached at 866-289-9673. Passengers can also reach out to the TSA Contact Center with questions about TSA procedures, upcoming travel or to provide feedback or voice concerns. 

Follow @TSA on Twitter and Instagram! 

Bob Burns
TSA Social Media Team

21 comments:

Susan Richart said...

I love it! Here it is Thursday and you're giving spring break travel tips while at AskTSA they are telling people that the long lines will soon end because spring break travel is "peaking." What will the excuse for the lines and wait times be when spring break travel is over?

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

RB said...

"Medication in liquid form is allowed in carry-on bags in excess of 3.4 ounces in reasonable quantities for the flight."

What exactly is a "reasonable quantity" of a liquid medication? Is it enough for just that flight segment, the complete itenery, or the duration of that persons trip?

What exact training do TSA screeners receive that allows them to determine how much liquid medication a person may need? Is TSA letting employees act as medical doctors?

And why does the TSA tool "Can I Bring" not provide a clear answer if Nitroglycerin medications are allowed or not? Is TSA to stupid to change a web page to return useful information?

Lastly, why does @AskTSA block citizens from accessing that twitter site? Does TSA only help some citizens?

Anonymous said...

Why do you have the 3.4-1-1 liquids policy? It's scientifically indefensible and does nothing to make anyone safer. Or have you been going through the motions for so long - it will be TEN YEARS of this stupidity come August - that you don't ever stop to think about how useless this policy is?

Anonymous said...

Why is one 6 oz bottle of sunscreen prohibited, but two 3 oz bottles are allowed? It's the same volume of liquid and the 6 oz bottle will easily fit inside a quart bag. I understand that you want to limit the total amount of liquids, which the quart bag accomplishes. Why does it matter what size the individual containers are inside the quart bag?

This seems like a really simple question. I've never seen the TSA answer it.

Laura Monteros said...

Thanks for the informative post, Bob.

Anonymous said...

If it is on your blog page, why is it no accepted at the checkpoint? Why are not the clerks better trained to know what is/not allowed and or prohibited?

Anonymous said...

RB said...
And why does the TSA tool "Can I Bring" not provide a clear answer if Nitroglycerin medications are allowed or not?

What are you on about? The tool clearly states:

Search Results For:

nitroglycerin pills

Check or Carry-on

TSA allows larger amounts of medically necessary liquids, gels, and aerosols in reasonable quantities for your trip, but you must declare them to security officers at the checkpoint for inspection.

We recommend, but do not require, that your medications be labeled to facilitate the security process.
...

It says the same thing for "nitroglycerin patch".

Wintermute said...

Which is a non-answer, which is RB's pount.

RB said...

Anonymous said...RB said...And why does the TSA tool "Can I Bring" not provide a clear answer if Nitroglycerin medications are allowed or not?

What are you on about? The tool clearly states:Search Results For: nitroglycerin pills Check or Carry-on TSA allows larger amounts of medically necessary liquids, gels, and aerosols in reasonable quantities for your trip, but you must declare them to security officers at the checkpoint for inspection.We recommend, but do not require, that your medications be labeled to facilitate the security process....It says the same thing for "nitroglycerin patch".March 12, 2016 at 9:03 AM
---------------------

Medical Nitro is not a larger amount of a medical liquid, gel, or aerosol. The Check or Carry-on verbage never clearly says the item is permitted and only addresses larger LGA's.

An easy fix that TSA apparently refuses to address allowing screeners to continue confiscating life saving medicines.

Jim Goudzwaard said...

So - we get to LAS (Las Vegas) and are in line at Allegiant with baggage to be checked in (not carried on) and some woman (Allegiant person) is roaming around yelling something. Can't hear her through all the commotion and continue in a terrible long line to just get our backs checked in. After 15-20 min., we finally get to the front and the lady behind the counter says (pointing at a small piece of paper which we finally figured out the screamer was handing out), "are you carrying any of these items". On the list are prescription medications. "Yes, we are carrying prescription medications in our check on luggage", we reply. She says, "You can't check those through in you checked baggage" to which we inquire "why". She says, "read the paper" which says, for today no prescription meds can be checked through in checked baggage. When we inquire as to what we are supposed to do with the prescription meds, she says, "just carry them". SO THE JEST HERE IS - YOUR TSA RULES APPLY UNTIL THEY DON'T APPLY. What we went through makes absolutely no sense!!!! Just sayin' - course, none of you could care about any of this! Have a great day hasslin' the flying public.

GSOLTSO said...

Jim Goudzwaard sez - "What we went through makes absolutely no sense!!!! Just sayin' - course, none of you could care about any of this! Have a great day hasslin' the flying public."

I agree with you, what you went through makes no sense, and I have never seen anything like that happen before. Can you post a picture or copy of the letters the airline employee was handing out so I can send it up the chain to find out what was going on, and if it was something by the airline?

West
TSA Blog Team

Anonymous said...

West, does that make more of less sense than forcing thousands of people to undergo invasive physical searches thanks to your reliance on naked body scanners with a 100 percent false positive rate?

Concerned Citizen said...

Who is Jon Corbett?

Anonymous said...

Blogger Wintermute said...
Which is a non-answer, which is RB's pount.

How is that a "non-answer"?? He wants to know "if Nitroglycerin medications are allowed or not", and the tool clearly states that nitroglycerin pills are allowed in Checked or Carry-on bags. It directly answers the question.

Anonymous said...

Blogger RB said...
Medical Nitro is not a larger amount of a medical liquid, gel, or aerosol.

But it is AN amount. If a "larger" amount is allowed, then clearly a smaller amount is allowed, too.

The Check or Carry-on verbage never clearly says the item is permitted

Incorrect. It IS allowed. "Check or Carry-on" is the exact wording it uses.

Anonymous said...

If you limit liquids to what will fit in a quart bag, why does it matter what size the individual bottles are inside that bag? What difference does it make if it is one large bottle or if it is several smaller bottles as long as they fit inside the bag?

Wintermute said...

The answer refers to larger amounts of medical liquids, of which medical nitro is not. So it answers a similar question, but not the one that was specifically asked.

RB said...

Anonymous said...
Blogger Wintermute said...
Which is a non-answer, which is RB's pount.

How is that a "non-answer"?? He wants to know "if Nitroglycerin medications are allowed or not", and the tool clearly states that nitroglycerin pills are allowed in Checked or Carry-on bags. It directly answers the question.

March 14, 2016 at 12:20 AM
................
No, it does not state any such thing.

The answer addresses larger quantities of LGA's. Medical Nitro is not a larger quantity of LGA.

RB said...

Anonymous Anonymous said...
Blogger RB said...
Medical Nitro is not a larger amount of a medical liquid, gel, or aerosol.

But it is AN amount. If a "larger" amount is allowed, then clearly a smaller amount is allowed, too.
The Check or Carry-on verbage never clearly says the item is permitted
I correct. It IS allowed. "Check or Carry-on" is the exact wording it uses.

March 14, 2016 at 12:24 AM
....................
If you query Nitroglycerin Pills you get this response:

Search Results For:
nitroglycerin pills

Check or Carry-on {Green border on page which is undefined}

TSA allows larger amounts of medically necessary liquids, gels, and aerosols in reasonable quantities for your trip, but you must declare them to security officers at the checkpoint for inspection.


If you query Aspirin you get this response:

Search Results For:
aspirin

Check or Carry-on {Green boarder on page which is undefined}

You may transport this items in carry-on or checked baggage. For items you wish to carry on, you should check with the airline to ensure that the item will fit in the overhead bin or underneath the seat of the airplane.

In the case of aspirin TSA gives a positive response but does not do so in the case of nitroglycerin pills. And as I have proven the response given for nitroglycerin pills is never answered negatively or affirmatively.

Anonymous said...

RB said:
In the case of aspirin TSA gives a positive response but does not do so in the case of nitroglycerin pills.

You yourself said it: BOTH the nitroglycerin pills and aspirin say:

Check or Carry-on {Green boarder on page which is undefined}

The answer for them BOTH is the same. If you're hung up on the exact wording, contact the webmaster or something.

Wintermute said...

They say the same this. One says it for the item queried. The other says it for something entiry different than what was asked.