Wednesday, February 17, 2016

TSA Week in Review: February 5 - 11

51 firearms were discovered last week in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 51 firearms discovered, 47 were loaded and 20 had a round chambered. All of the firearms pictured were discovered last week. See a complete list below.
If an item looks like a real bomb, grenade, mine, etc., it is prohibited. When these items are found at a checkpoint or in checked baggage, they can cause significant delays because our explosives detection professionals must respond to resolve the alarm. Even if they are novelty items, you are prohibited from bringing them on board the aircraft. Three inert grenades were discovered in carry-on bags. One was found at Phoenix (PHX), and the other two were discovered at Fort Lauderdale (FLL).
Two artfully concealed razors were discovered the same day at LaGuardia (LGA) on two different passengers. A razorblade was discovered tucked into a hatband, and a straight razor was detected in a shoe.
A small bag of cocaine was discovered concealed in the battery compartment of a wireless mouse at Charlotte (CLT).
A pen knife was discovered in carry-on bag at Oakland (OAK).
A traveler at the Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport (ECP) packed a mini pistol crossbow in their carry-on bag.
Left - Right - Items discovered at ATL, AUS, AUS, CHO, EWR, and EWR


In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly in carry-on bags, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons, stun guns, small pocketknives and many other prohibited items too numerous to note.

You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline.


Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $11,000. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions; that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates.

Read our 2015 Year in Review post! If you haven’t read them yet, make sure you check out our year in review posts for 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014.

Follow @TSA on Twitter and Instagram!

Bob Burns
TSA Social Media Team

7 comments:

Scott said...

51 Handguns!! Unbelievable!! Thanks for all You do!! (I have no concern waiting in line for security checks when I'm flying!!)

Fix the TSA said...

There is something seriously wrong with the "mini pistol crossbow" photo. It does not appear to be a photo of an actual object. Instead, it looks like a photo of a television screen or another printed photo.

The rightmost photos of guns (top two rows) in the top gun photo are cut off.

SSSS for some reason said...

"..Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. "

Too often? Not even slightly. All of your finds for this blotter post represent less than one percent of the total number of people you inspected. These finds are less than one percent of one percent. I don't know which dictionary you are using but that is the exact opposite of common.



Anonymous said...

Saw blades ?

Anonymous said...

As always, absolutely nothing you needed your slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners to detect. Meanwhile, how many people suffered physical searches thanks to false alarms on these useless machines?

Why are Curtis Burns and West Cooper unwilling to address, let alone answer, that question?

How many weeks has it been since you last trumpeted something dangerous you found with the naked body scanners?

tramky said...

It must be pointed out that little bags of cocaine or any other drug have NOTHING to do with aircraft safety. NOTHING. I don't know why TSA deals with that kind of stuff. It is a distraction from the intention and underlying mission of the TSA.

Simply stating that "but it is illegal" still have NOTHING to with the safety of the flying public or flight safety. Focus the mission, TSA.

RB said...

I don't condone illegal drug use or the trafficking of drugs but I will never believe that finding a small quantity of cocaine in a computer mouse was anything but an illegal targeted search for drugs by TSA.