Tuesday, February 23, 2016

Training for new-hires now at central TSA Academy



A photo of a new employee was training at FLETC
Since January, TSA new-hire training now is conducted at the new TSA Academy located at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center, known as FLETC, in Glynco, Georgia – a move that centralizes training for new employees, which previously was held locally at U.S. airports.


While at FLETC, TSA student officers train at replica checkpoints involving real-world scenarios such as social engineering tactics, screening individuals with disabilities, and how to effectively implement alarms resolve procedures. Students also attend a live explosives demonstration at an improvised explosives device range with explosives experts, so they can best understand the impact that an IED can have when detonated in a controlled environment. The training culminates with a capstone exercise where the students run checkpoint operations while academy instructors provide guidance and oversight.


Each week, eight classes are taught equaling 192 students. Nearly 5,000 new-hire employees will receive this training by the end of September. Students must receive a passing grade on an image interpretation and a job-knowledge test in order to graduate. Those who graduate return to their airports to begin another phase of on-the-job-training.

The transition to the TSA Academy is integral to the Administrator’s intent to invest in people and further professionalize the workforce; develop an esprit de corps and sense of belonging to a larger organization; and provide a common level of training for every newly hired TSA officer while achieving stronger consistency across airports.

Read more about the TSA Academy in this recent article from NPR


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23 comments:

Abby Frost said...

Thank you for this insight, sounds like a great program!

helen gordon carmichael seaman said...

I live in the Glynco area and will welcome our visitors as they are always most kind to the residents 😀

Anonymous said...

Great news. Congrats to the new Administrator and the team at TSA.

Fix the TSA said...

Is it true that TSA screeners go through an additional four-weeks of on the job training after they attend this two week class room training?

If so, what policies and procedures are in place so the on the job training does not contradict or negate the class room training? Who supervises the on the job training and what training has the trainers had?

Susan Richart said...

"...provide a common level of training for every newly hired TSA officer while achieving stronger consistency across airports."

I thought the inconsistency across airports, and even within airports, was deliberate to keep all those terrorists looking to bomb airplanes into oblivion off balance. Now it seems with the above statement it was just an excuse to cover up abysmal service.

How long is the OJT portion of the training? Long enough I imagine for new screeners to fall under the influence of managers who just don't care, long enough to revert back to the same bad attitude that screeners who have been with the TSA for any length of time too often display.

How many individuals are accepted into the program but when they learn they have to go to GA for two weeks, then drop out? Or are you upfront with potential employees about the requirement to be away from home for 2 weeks.

And, finally, who wrote this article? It reads like a 5th grader's book report.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Anonymous said...

Why are people who are not and never will be law enforcement being trained at a law enforcement facility?

Anonymous said...

Looks like the training academy already needs a new program manager:

https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/430415700/

Susan Richart said...

Once again, look at the times of the first two comments in particular in relation to the time this thread was posted. Both people from Georgia. The fix was in.

RB said...

What are passing grades for image interpretation and job knowledge skills? Is it anything better than 5%?

Anonymous said...

Why are people who are not and never will be law enforcement being trained at a law enforcement facility?

really? This is a real question? Same reason people who are not hotel workers go to hotels for training. In this case it is federal officers being trained at a federal facility. really picking at the bottom dirt there aren't ya?

Fix the TSA said...

Boldy (or whatever you want to be called),

Why are you taking questions from American citizens to government employees so personally?

You appear to be very upset that anyone would question the TSA spending tens of millions of dollars on the training facility.

Why?

Anonymous said...

Why are you taking questions from American citizens to government employees so personally? not personal at all. I'm just generally blown away by the inability of so many posters to ignore the absolute obvious and see corruption, dishonesty and scandal at every turn. I am a supporter of TSA. I understand what they do and why they do it. For reasons nobody ever needs to know, terrorist threats are very personal to me. I have 100% confidence that the threat is real and they are waiting for us to put our guard down. Anyone who thinks otherwise is living a dream. I absolutely know for a fact that TSA makes mistakes and has some less than desirable people working there. I also know that they are working on it. However, in most cases, I blame the system not the officer.

You appear to be very upset that anyone would question the TSA spending tens of millions of dollars on the training facility. people complain because TSA officers make so many mistakes, then they complain when they take steps to solve the problem. People just want to complain.

Why?

Wintermute said...

So, which is it? Not personal at all, or very personal to you?

Terrorism is a very rare event. There may be a threat, but it is very tiny compared to, say, getting struck by lightning - twice. A simple risk analysis would show that we are paying a disproportionate amount of money for the threat. Not only that, but we are spending it on reactive measures instead of practively. This means that the TSA is minimally equiped to handle yesterday's failed plot, but not any new threats.

Fix the TSA said...

Bold TSApologist, I am unconvinced that "terrorist threats are very personal to" you, especially since you refuse to say why.

I am glad that you admit there are problems in the TSA. Many of them are systemic and come from intrusive and unconstitutional policies and procedures.

A lot of problems come from TSA employees too. It isn't just "a few bad apples" and it isn't every employee either. But there are a lot of TSA screeners that do a bad job and violate the American public's privacy, property and bodies. And the TSA blog team deletes a lot of comments and refuses to answer questions.

There are fixes needed in TSA policies and employees.

Anonymous said...

So, which is it? Not personal at all, or very personal to you? I didn't think what I wrote was confusing at all. But your response answers a lot of questions for me, thanks

Terrorism is a very rare event. There may be a threat, but it is very tiny compared to, say, getting struck by lightning - twice. A simple risk analysis would show that we are paying a disproportionate amount of money for the threat. Not only that, but we are spending it on reactive measures instead of practively. This means that the TSA is minimally equiped to handle yesterday's failed plot, but not any new threats.

rare? really? In 2015 alone there were 2858 Islamic attacks in 53 countries, in which 27588 people were killed and 26136 injured. The are several different terrorist groups. Last week alone there were 38 attacks and over 200 killed. You would have to believe that Hillary is a saint if you were naïve enough to believe the threat is tiny.

Wintermute said...

What does Hillary have to do with anything? No one said a thing about any Hillary. Deflect, much?

Let's, for a moment, pretend that I don't question your numbers and take them at face value. 200 people compared to the world's population is, indeed, a small number. But your numbers are as made up as the rest of your stories, so that number goes down when actual terror events are considered.

Wintermute said...

Not confusing, just contradictory. If terrorism is so personal to you, then you take what is written on this blog personally. That is just human nature.

Fix the TSA said...

Bold TSApologist, this is your second attempt to politicize comments about the TSA. First, you insulted the President, who is a Democrat. Next, you insult a presidential candidate who is a Democrat.

The problems with the TSA are not political and your partisanship is unnecessary.

Your "Islamic" attacks: Where did you get your statistics? How many of these alleged "Islamic" attacks happened at US airports?

The threat of dying on a plane anywhere for ANY reason is very, very low. The threat of dying on a US-based flight because of terrorism is all but zero, and that doesn't even include the any positive results due to TSA! That's just plain, old statistics.

Anonymous said...

I am old and i remember the times before the need for TSA, happy days gone by. Today I and my family wouldn't get on a commercial flight that wasn't screened by TSA. I don't understand the blow back, sure it's a lot of taxpayers money, but aren't you glad it's actually being used for something useful to the taxpayers?Alway room for improvement. I've been on both local and international flights and with TSO's in place I've yet to mess a flight or loss any ideas in my bags. Everyone, even while stress and over-worked have been professional and through.

Anthony Bailey said...

Hmm well its illegal to carry a weapon on a flight, so transportation "security officer" enforce the law by screening passengers. That's why there trained at LAW enforcing facilities.. Its not rocket science.

Anthony Bailey said...

Because they enforce the law...

Anthony Bailey said...

Hmm well its illegal to carry a weapon on a flight, so transportation "security officer" enforce the law by screening passengers. That's why there trained at LAW enforcing facilities.. Its not rocket science.

mmafan said...

"Why are people who are not and never will be law enforcement being trained at a law enforcement facility?'
_________________________________________________________

Not all agencies and training conducted at FLETC is law enforcement related but their roles are supportive in a law enforcement capacity and they will work with LE at some point. I see the rationale for TSA training at Glynco. I've trained there and while I'm not LE or carry a gun, I have found the environment to be very structured, respectful, supportive and have met a variety of great people whom I have run across during my career. I think the almost military-like structure of FLETC is very beneficial. It's also a great way to make contacts and form future working relationships. Very good question you posed.