Friday, February 12, 2016

@AskTSA Travel Tips In Over 140 Characters: Valentine’s Day





It’s been nearly six months since we launched the @AskTSA program. Since then, we’ve been receiving many questions, so we felt that it would  be helpful to share some of these Q & A’s with our blog readers, where we can respond in more than 140 characters!

If you’re scratching your head and wondering what @AskTSA is, it’s a small team of TSA professionals from various agency offices who answer TSA related questions from the traveling public that are sent via Twitter. You can read more about the program in this recent USA Today article.

Somebody tweeted @AskTSA yesterday about traveling with flowers, so we decided to post some Valentine’s Day travel tips. 


In response to the above tweet, yes, you can bring flowers through the checkpoint for transport on the plane as a carry-on, but not in a container filled with water. We suggest wrapping the stems in damp paper towels and plastic wrap or foil to keep them hydrated while you travel. This special method is recommended due to the
3-1-1 liquid guidelines.

In addition to traveling with flowers, here are some other Valentine’s Day related travel tips:

  • Chocolates – Regular and cream/liquid filled chocolates are good to go.
  • Perfume – Containers 3.4 ounces and smaller are permitted in your carry-on bag as long as they are placed in the plastic bag per the 3-1-1 liquid guidelines. Larger containers may be packed in your checked baggage.
  • Gift Baskets – Gift baskets often contain lotions, oils, and perfumes. If you’re carrying these items through the checkpoint, they must adhere to the 3-1-1 liquid guidelines.
  • Wrapped Gifts – It’s permissible to pack wrapped gifts in your bags, but if the gift alarms or requires additional screening, we’ll have to unwrap it.
  • Destination Weddings – If you have a destination wedding planned for Valentine’s Day, be sure to check out this blog post on traveling with a wedding dress.

You may also wish to consult with your airline about any policies they may have regarding the item (s) you’d like to travel with.

https://twitter.com/AskTSAIf you have any TSA related travel questions, please send a tweet to our @AskTSA team. They’re available to answer your questions, 8 a.m.- 10 p.m., Eastern time, weekdays; 9 a.m. -7 p.m., weekends/holidays.

Follow @TSA on Twitter and Instagram!


Bob Burns
TSA Social Media Team


19 comments:

Anonymous said...

Hey Bob, the link to your article on wedding dresses has lots of advertising from commenters. I thought that was verboten.

Anonymous said...

Since there is no scientific justification for the 3.4-1-1 restriction, why do you still force passengers to abide by it?

Anonymous said...

If I have a larger than 3.4 oz bottle of perfume, but it still fits in the quart bag, why can't I bring that through security. Let's say it is 6 oz. What difference is there between one 6 oz bottle versus two 3 oz bottles? It's the same volume. Either set of bottles fit inside a quart bag. Why is 6 oz somehow dangerous, but two 3 oz containers safe? If the 6 oz bottle is so dangerous, why is it thrown in the trash next to the checkpoint?

RB said...

Not mentioned by the TSA Blog Team is the very high number of complaints found on @Ask TSA about abusive screening and disrespect from TSA Screeners. Why didn't you mention that Bobbie?

Anonymous said...

From @AskTSA this morning, 2/14:

"Just saw a male @TSA agent interrogate a scared 5-year-old girl at the MSP airport. I feel so much safer already..."

TSA's response: "We don’t like to hear this, Grigory! Pls provide addition details so we may look into this...."

From that response, it seems as if screeners are not supposed to be interrogating children so why does it continue?

http://www.flyertalk.com/forum/26030827-post1.html

What is a screener doing interrogating a child? What did he expect to learn? That she was being kidnapped? It's NOT the job of the TSA to stop kidnappings. If the screener thought the child was in trouble, he should have called the police. FULL STOP.

screen shot

Susan Richart said...

When are we going to see an article on the TSA's initiative to send all new recruits to Georgia to a "TSA Academy" for training?

Will that article tell us how much that is going to cost us, the taxpayers?

Will that article tell us how many of those who are sent to Georgia on our dime wash out before they finish "training"?

Will TSA be sending people it employs only part-time as screeners or will all new employees be guaranteed full-time work?

Here's a hint for the TSA: TSA needs a house cleaning from the top down. That's the only way to improve your organization and to make a better screening experience for all passengers.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Anonymous said...

RB wrote:

"Not mentioned by the TSA Blog Team is the very high number of complaints found on @Ask TSA about abusive screening and disrespect from TSA Screeners. Why didn't you mention that Bobbie?"

I also note that positive comments on that Twitter account are being written by DHS employees.

Fix the TSA said...

Bob, you said above that @AskTSA is "...a small team of TSA professionals from various agency offices"?

But the TSA solicited vendors (private contractors) to run the @AskTSA Twitter account:

https://www.fbo.gov/index?s=opportunity&mode=form&id=1f531205ba3a331bc6a53fb42d0168e9&tab=core&_cview=0

So are you saying the @AskTSA employees are not contractors, Bob?

RB said...

Anonymous said...
If I have a larger than 3.4 oz bottle of perfume, but it still fits in the quart bag, why can't I bring that through security. Let's say it is 6 oz. What difference is there between one 6 oz bottle versus two 3 oz bottles? It's the same volume. Either set of bottles fit inside a quart bag. Why is 6 oz somehow dangerous, but two 3 oz containers safe? If the 6 oz bottle is so dangerous, why is it thrown in the trash next to the checkpoint?

February 12, 2016 at 9:10 PM
........................
There is no difference as you and TSA already knows.

TSA is only trying to make travel more difficult not safer.

RB said...

TSA's response: "We don’t like to hear this, Grigory! Pls provide addition details so we may look into this...."

,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

TSA doesn't like to hear this being made public but that is all TSA cares about.

Abuse is TSA's last name.

Anonymous said...

"What is a screener doing interrogating a child? What did he expect to learn? That she was being kidnapped? It's NOT the job of the TSA to stop kidnappings. If the screener thought the child was in trouble, he should have called the police. FULL STOP."
--------------------------------------------------
Uh, and how would the screener have an inkling the child was in trouble without talking to the child?
You're so quick to slam everything TSA does that you would even put a child in jeopardy to make a point?
Nice compassion there.

Wintermute said...

Here's a hint for the TSA: TSA needs a house cleaning from the top down. That's the only way to improve your organization and to make a better screening experience for all passengers.
---
They also need to hire someone who understands what Risk Analysis is, and actually follow their recommendations...

Susan Richart said...

Anonymous wrote: 'Uh, and how would the screener have an inkling the child was in trouble without talking to the child? You're so quick to slam everything TSA does that you would even put a child in jeopardy to make a point? Nice compassion there."

Well, if he's questioning her, he must have some kind of a "inkling" - or perhaps he just questions every child that comes his way.

Just as with drugs and guns, if the screener thought something was off, it was his obligation to call the real authorities NOT to question a child.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Susan Richart said...

http://www.flyertalk.com/forum/26188997-post1.html

:-)

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

RB said...

Uh, and how would the screener have an inkling the child was in trouble without talking to the child?
You're so quick to slam everything TSA does that you would even put a child in jeopardy to make a point?
Nice compassion there.

February 15, 2016 at 10:06 PM
...........................
That isn't TSA's job. If a TSA screener has a concern then they should call police. TSA screeners have no training or authority to investigate possible crimes.

RB said...

"Check in regularly for "TSA Travel Tips" and our end of week "TSA Week in Review" posts on Fridays."

......
Will the End of the Week post for the period closing 2/12/16 be posted before the End of the Week of 2/19/16?

Anonymous said...

Susan Richart said...
When are we going to see an article on the TSA's initiative to send all new recruits to Georgia to a "TSA Academy" for training? finally something we agree on. TSA is already sending new hire to the "TSA academy.

Will that article tell us how much that is going to cost us, the taxpayers? just a guess, but I would imagine the cost will be a few thousand dollars more per officer than training them at the airport. Only time will tell but perhaps with more uniform training in a more structured environment, some of the lower quality officers will be weeded out sooner.

Will that article tell us how many of those who are sent to Georgia on our dime wash out before they finish "training"?

Will TSA be sending people it employs only part-time as screeners or will all new employees be guaranteed full-time work? I think if TSA hired full time and paid better, they could attract a better quality officer. The way TSA is structured now, it is not a career job and thus they do not attract the best.

Here's a hint for the TSA: TSA needs a house cleaning from the top down. That's the only way to improve your organization and to make a better screening experience for all passengers. they do need to get their priorities straight for sure. It either a professionally managed and operated organization with quality officers or it isn't. Right now, they want to have it both ways. They hopefully are making advances by now having uniform training in Georgia. If they can get quality officers and offer them appropriate pay in line with other government agencies, full time work, they can become the "world class organization" they want to be.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement



Susan Richart said...

Dear Boldy, let me be very clear that we do NOT agree on the establishment of a TSA "training academy"

We could be close to agreement on the remainder of your comments, except for the cost of this experiment.

Boldy, these screeners are going to be in GA for two weeks and then sent back to their airports for on-the-job training. That's where any benefit from the "academy" will evaporate faster than raindrops on a side walk on a 100 degree day.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Fix the TSA said...

Boldy (seriously, what should we call you? It should be something more specific than just "Anonymous".)

It looks like there is some common ground between you and me (and possibly some other TSA critics).

Any chance we can try to build upon that and work towards fixing the problems, rather than arguing the same old stuff every week?