Friday, January 15, 2016

TSA Week in Review: January 8 – 14

Discovered 46 firearms

46 firearms were discovered this week in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 46 firearms discovered, 38 were loaded and 15 had a round chambered. All of the firearms pictured were discovered this week. See a complete list below.

Discovered a grenade

If an item looks like a real bomb, grenade, mine, etc., it is prohibited. When these items are found at a checkpoint or in checked baggage, they can cause significant delays because our explosives detection professionals must respond to resolve the alarm. Even if they are novelty items, you are prohibited from bringing them on board the aircraft. The inert grenade pictured was detected in a carry-on bag this week at Chicago O’Hare (ORD).

Discovered a 3-inch knife

A 3-inch folding knife was discovered in a Nashville (BNA) traveler’s bra after being screening with advanced imaging technology. Concealed knives can lead to arrest and fines.

Discovered kung fu ninja throwing knives
Clockwise from the top, these weapons were discovered at: DAL, MEM, BOI, MEM and LAS
A box of ammunition

When packed properly, ammunition can be transported in your checked baggage, but it is never permissible to pack ammo in your carry-on bag. These 9mm rounds were discovered in a carry-on bag at EWN.


In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly in carry-on bags, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons, stun guns, small pocketknives and many other prohibited items too numerous to note.


Firearms Discovered in Carry-On Bags Chart


You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline. 
You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms. 
 
Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $11,000. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions; that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates. 

Read our 2014 Year in Review post! If you haven’t read them yet, make sure you check out our year in review posts for 2011, 2012 and 2013.

Follow @TSA on Twitter and Instagram! 

Bob Burns
TSA Social Media Team

27 comments:

mary epps said...

Thanks all , and thanks Bob

Ov said...

The answer is education and training..

Anonymous said...

Mary Epps is a spammer, so her thanks is fake, West.

Photo Phinish said...

Why was mary's 5:09pm comment approved, but mine that was submitted soon after was not approved? Her comment was not there when I commented. Is it just delayed or was it deleted?

Susan Richart said...

Thread posted at 4:52 p.m. and the first comment, favorable of course, is posted at 5:09 p.m.

Something is surely rotten in TSAland.

Mary Epps, the commenter, hasn't been heard from in a while. Her last comment that I can find was posted 25 minutes after the blog thread of April 25, 2013 appeared at 6:01 p.m. Surprise, surprise, it was a favorable comment.

http://blog.tsa.gov/2013/04/passengers-may-now-receive-notification.html

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Photo Phinish said...

Why is the TSA employee including pliers and a phone, both 'allowed items' in the photo of the three-pointed throwing star on the green grid? I thought only the police touched and arranged weapons for the TSA photo op. A cop wouldn't care about a phone or pliers, since they are not weapons.

Do TSA employees touch, pick up, and arrange non-guns for pictures?

RB said...

Blog post up at 4:52 PM and the first comment and only comment, favorable of course, submitted at 5:09 PM. How many comments required censoring to make that happen? Cherry Picking much TSA Blog Team. You three TSA Bloggers really demonstrate everything wrong about TSA and its Blue Shirts!

Anonymous said...

"...46 firearms were discovered this week in carry-on bags around the nation."

Yawn...... 46 firearms found from about 48 million passengers. What is that in percentage terms? How many zeros?

How many were arrested? How many were convicted of terrorism? How many of the firearms were found with the nudie-scanners? How many explosive-teams were dispatched to handle the ammunition?

Seriously, you post every week about what you find but you never post any success stories.... why?

GSOLTSO said...

Mary Epps sez - "Thanks all , and thanks Bob"

Thanks to you as well Mary.

Ov sez - "The answer is education and training.."

That is the answer in many cases, but experience plays a large part in the learning curve as well.

Anon sez - "Mary Epps is a spammer, so her thanks is fake, West."

Ok.

Photo Phinish sez - "Why was mary's 5:09pm comment approved, but mine that was submitted soon after was not approved? Her comment was not there when I commented. Is it just delayed or was it deleted?"

I do not recall seeing a comment under this handle name at the time that comment (and other comments btw) was approved.

Photo Phinish also sez - "Why is the TSA employee including pliers and a phone, both 'allowed items' in the photo of the three-pointed throwing star on the green grid? I thought only the police touched and arranged weapons for the TSA photo op. A cop wouldn't care about a phone or pliers, since they are not weapons.

Do TSA employees touch, pick up, and arrange non-guns for pictures?"

Those are other items that may have been in the bag during the search. The pliers may have been over-sized, and as such would not be allowed into the area. Depending upon the weapon type, TSOs may handle them - knives, box cutters, and other items of that nature are often handled by individual TSOs and LTSO/STSOs to be positioned for photos if need be. Firearms are a completely different story, and have a different set of protocols to be followed.

West
TSA Blog Team

RB said...

"I do not recall seeing a comment under this handle name at the time that comment (and other comments btw) was approved."

Notice that West does not deny cherry picking favorable comments.

Anonymous said...

Hey, West, why are people at @AskTSA telling passengers their Clear Care is allowed to fly when it contains hydrogen peroxide. Has TSA finally wised up and learned that the amount of H2O2 in a Clear Care bottle isn't dangerous?

Photo Phinish said...

Interesting information, West, about what "dangerous" items TSA employees are allowed to handle. What kind of training do TSA employees receive to safely confiscate, photograph, and throw dangerous items in a bin right there?

You still haven't said WHY the phone was photographed, and the pliers don't look oversized, based upon the photo, which is why I asked about them. Just because the "allowed" items were in the bag does not explain why they wee photographed. I have been looking through the photos on this site and don't see any pictures of knives and such next to underwear or pens or other "allowed" items.

I will resubmit my comment about the fake date stamp. Hopefully, a TSA blogger team member will "see" it, and not delete it. Maybe that's what happened, West. One of your team members deleted my fake date stamp comment, which is why you "didn't see" it.

Adrian said...

Will the TSA submit the new policy of preventing some AIT opt-outs to a public comment period before putting the policy into effect, as required by law?

Anonymous said...

As always, absolutely nothing you needed your slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners to detect. Meanwhile, how many people suffered physical searches thanks to false alarms on these useless machines?

Why are Curtis Burns and West Cooper unwilling to address, let alone answer, that question?

How many weeks has it been since you last trumpeted something dangerous you found with the naked body scanners?

GSOLTSO said...

Rb sez - "Notice that West does not deny cherry picking favorable comments."

The only time I pick cherries is when they are ripe out near my Grandmothers place.

Photo Phinish sez - "You still haven't said WHY the phone was photographed, and the pliers don't look oversized, based upon the photo, which is why I asked about them. Just because the "allowed" items were in the bag does not explain why they wee photographed. I have been looking through the photos on this site and don't see any pictures of knives and such next to underwear or pens or other "allowed" items.

I will resubmit my comment about the fake date stamp. Hopefully, a TSA blogger team member will "see" it, and not delete it. Maybe that's what happened, West. One of your team members deleted my fake date stamp comment, which is why you "didn't see" it."

I have no idea why those items were in the photo. They could have been other items that were in the bag and were left sitting out during the photography, the pliers *could* have been over-sized, appearances notwithstanding. I can give you no reason for the other items in the photo, as I was not there when it was taken, and we have no other information on it.

I did not see any such comment in the folder when I logged in Saturday morning - what you have posted in the last line there is not something that would be considered a violation of the posted guidelines.

West
TSA Blog Team

Anonymous said...

I recently traveled with a 4 oz medical liquid. I read that I could carry it through security by declaring it separately. Instead, I just put it in the bag with the rest of my liquids. It made it through security because it doesn't look visibly larger than a 3.4 oz bottle. If I got caught, I figure it wouldn't be a problem since it obviously was a medical liquid.

It made me think, what is the purpose of the individual 3.4 oz bottle size limit? I get that the quart bag limits the total amount of liquids a passenger can bring, but the individual size limits make no sense. I guess they help the economy because people have to buy smaller sizes for travel. I have a 4 oz bottle that easily fits inside the quart bag. Why isn't that allowed? I could break it into two smaller containers, but why?

Photo Phinish said...

I appreciate the clarification, West.

RB said...

GSOLTSO said...
Rb sez - "Notice that West does not deny cherry picking favorable comments."

"The only time I pick cherries is when they are ripe out near my Grandmothers place."

Is that so West? You never place favorable comments at the front of the line or censor comments that comply with the illegal TSA posting guidelines?

When pigs fly!

RB said...

Why hasn't the TSA Blog posted about Whole Body Imagers no longer being optional? Afraid to handle difficult topics?

Anonymous said...

The knife in the bra would have been found by a walk-through or hand wand metal detector. Your waste of millions upon millions of dollars for faulty naked pic scanners was unnecessary.

Anonymous said...

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense. now you're even allowing college kids (kaydets) to endure more reasonable screening, but those who sacrificed for 20+ have to take their bloody shoes and belts off!! it's pretty clear that TSA doesn't understand risk assessment or risk-based anything, much less security.

Anonymous said...

"The only time I pick cherries is when they are ripe out near my Grandmothers place."

Or when you ignore perfectly legitimate questions about the body scanners' false positive rate, which is basically 100%.

Photo Phinish said...

Bob, who added the fake date stamp to the throwing star photo (lower right corner of its montage)?

Do you just take a screenshot after cutting and pasting photos in Powerpoint or MS Paint? You forgot to deselect the picture before taking a screenshot of the gun photos.

What were you doing when you messed up the right edge of the top right corner photo of the gun montage? Did you also change the color of that gun's trigger?

RB said...

http://www.wesh.com/news/tsa-finds-pen-gun-at-orlando-international-airport/37518444

A small .22 cal pen gun was found at Orlando on 12/30/15. But police have no record. So what happened to the gun? Did some TSA screener take it home?

Also, what happens to the knifes, grenades, and other edged weapons that are found?

GSOLTSO said...

Photo Phinish sez - "I appreciate the clarification, West."

No problem!

RB sez - "When pigs fly!"

Pigs fly all the time, they are also recognized as service animals in many cases.

http://abcnews.go.com/US/story?id=94861

RB sez - "So what happened to the gun? Did some TSA screener take it home?

Also, what happens to the knifes, grenades, and other edged weapons that are found?"

The gun pen would have been handled by the local LEOs, they determine the disposition of the item.

Knives and other edged weapons are given the same options as LAG and other blunt items. Grenades and such would be handled by the EOD group that responds for them (usually local LEOs again).

West
TSA Blog Team

Wintermute said...

TSAgent West said...

"Grenades and such would be handled by the EOD group that responds for them..."

When was the last time an EOD group was called for a novelty grenade?



Wintermute said...

And... Silence... I posit that this is because TSA screeners are, indeed, smarter than a rock and can tell the difference between a novelty item and the real thing, requiring no EOD response to deal with novelty items. Therefore, one has to wonder why the novelty items are confiscated to begin with. Then one realizes that the TSA has to justify their $8b/yr existence somehow :/