Tuesday, January 26, 2016

TSA Week in Review: January 15 - 21

Discovered hundreds of thousands of guns in 2015

If you haven’t already, check out our annual Year in Review post for statistics and images of some of the more interesting items our officers discovered in 2015. While you’re at it, you can also check out our year in review posts for 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014.

Discovered 51 firearms

51 firearms were discovered last week in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 51 firearms discovered, 41 were loaded and 16 had a round chambered. All of the firearms pictured were discovered this week. See a complete list below.

Discovered knives
Top to bottom, these knives were discovered in carry-on bags at PVD, ORD and PHX.


In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly in carry-on bags, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons, stun guns, small pocketknives and many other prohibited items too numerous to note.

Firearms Discovered in Carry-On Bag chart

You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline.


Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $11,000. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions; that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates.

Read our 2015 Year in Review post! If you haven’t read them yet, make sure you check out our year in review posts for 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014.

Follow @TSA on Twitter and Instagram!

Bob Burns
TSA Social Media Team
 

22 comments:

Chuck said...

Historically speaking, makes you wonder how many items on the "do not carry" list made it through?

Anonymous said...

As always, absolutely nothing you needed your slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners to detect. Meanwhile, how many people suffered physical searches thanks to false alarms on these useless machines?

Why are Curtis Burns and West Cooper unwilling to address, let alone answer, that question?

How many weeks has it been since you last trumpeted something dangerous you found with the naked body scanners?

Wintermute said...

One doesn't have to wonder. The TSA has a known failure rate of 95%. So you can do the math and see that TSA doesn't really protect us any more than my anti-tigee rock does ;)

RB said...

Anonymous Chuck said...
Historically speaking, makes you wonder how many items on the "do not carry" list made it through?

January 26, 2016 at 10:22 AM

........................
Based on DHS Inspector General testing about 95% of target items are missed by our TSA screeners at a cost to taxpayers of roughly $8,000,000,000.00 annually.

Pierre said...

Like Archie Bunker said "give everyone on the plane a gun and no one will dare hijack the plane".

single father said...

My 3 year old son (then 2 years old) And I were "randomly" detained and searched 5 times within 2 hours at JFK international arrivals terminal. After 23 hours of travel and two other international airports in Korea and Cambodia. Thanks TSA, really made a difference in the crime wave.

Photo Phinish said...

Is the second, very dark photo of a knife just an image from a scanner rather than a photograph of the knife?

I guess that is sort of a clever thing to do if you cannot work a camera?

Anonymous said...

Bob, are you going to blog about how the DEA inappropriately hired a TSA screener to work as a confidential source to look for drugs in passengers' luggage and bodies.

https://oig.justice.gov/reports/2016/f160107b.pdf

"The Department of Justice (DOJ) Office of the Inspector General (OIG) initiated this investigation upon the receipt of information from the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) that a Transportation Security Administration (TSA) airport Security Screener had been registered as a paid Confidential Source (CS) for the DEA."

Anonymous said...

I read that St. Louis's TSA precheck lane was permanently closed. Is this true?

I read that Phoenix's TSA precheck lane is almost always closed. Will it be closed permanently?

What other TSA precheck lanes are scheduled to be permanently closed?

RB said...

TSA can interdict harmless water and babies milk but misses 95% of real threat items.

Way to go TSA!

RB said...

"Check in regularly for "TSA Travel Tips" and our end of week "TSA Week in Review" posts on Fridays."

"TUESDAY, JANUARY 26, 2016

TSA Week in Review: January 15 - 21"

Will there be an update to "About This Blog" since the Friday "Week in Review" post is no longer published just on Friday's?





Susan Richart said...

"Anonymous said...

I read that St. Louis's TSA precheck lane was permanently closed. Is this true?

I read that Phoenix's TSA precheck lane is almost always closed. Will it be closed permanently?

What other TSA precheck lanes are scheduled to be permanently closed?"

TSA can't get the enrollment needed to continue justify the staffing of PreCheck lanes, so yes, you will see more and more of the closed.

Go look at the @AskTSA Twitter page and you will see many complaints about the lack of PreCheck lanes.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Anonymous said...

Blogger single father said...
My 3 year old son (then 2 years old) And I were "randomly" detained and searched 5 times within 2 hours at JFK international arrivals terminal. After 23 hours of travel and two other international airports in Korea and Cambodia. Thanks TSA, really made a difference in the crime wave.

TSA screeners touched a TWO-YEAR OLD child FIVE TIMES? What disgusting policy, procedure, rule, brainwashing, power-trip were these screeners on?!

West, I'm sure you can find out what happened, right? Google or talking with one of your TSA buddies?

Fix The TSA said...

Year in review guns montage has at least four gun photos used twice. At least one of the duplicate photos was edited and reused in a blog post in 2015, so this single gun photo has twice been used to represent two different guns.

Anonymous said...

Hello Anonymous (whoever you are) for years I have been reading this Blog, and I have finally come to the conclusion that the majority of you go out of your way to vilify the TSA. You will make up stories, tell half-truths, or just outright lie to suit your needs. Well I’m here to tell you that TSA is not a bad organization; yes they have problems, but every other corporate structure in the world dose too. You’re just mad because you think TSA is infringing on your rights. WRONG! Flying is not a right; you have to do what the airlines want you to do in order to fly. So you have to put up with a little inconvenience, it’s worth it to keep passengers safe. If you don’t like what TSA is doing, then do the world a favor, DON’T FLY!!!!!!!!!

Anonymous said...

Anonymous Anonymous said...
Bob, are you going to blog about how the DEA inappropriately hired a TSA screener to work as a confidential source to look for drugs in passengers' luggage and bodies.

https://oig.justice.gov/reports/2016/f160107b.pdf

"The Department of Justice (DOJ) Office of the Inspector General (OIG) initiated this investigation upon the receipt of information from the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) that a Transportation Security Administration (TSA) airport Security Screener had been registered as a paid Confidential Source (CS) for the DEA."

January 27, 2016 at 6:35 PM
------------------------------------
So what? What better person to look for drugs than someone who is already allowed to search persons and belongings. Don't bring drugs to an airport. Simple.

Susan Richart said...

An enlightened anonymous person wrote: "Flying is not a right"

How about this, enlightened one: "A citizen of the United States has a public right of transit through the navigable airspace." 49 U.S. Code

The airlines are NOT requiring passengers to submit to abuse at airport; it's our government that's violating our rights. If airlines insisted passengers be scoped, groped, forced to disrobe, they would be out of business.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Anonymous said...

"So you have to put up with a little inconvenience, it’s worth it to keep passengers safe."

Even when that inconvenience does nothing to make anyone safe, like the liquids nonsense, the shoe carnival, the BDO fraud, and the naked body scanners?

Why are you so upset that people want effective security proportionate to the actual threat, which is very very small?

RB said...

"So what? What better person to look for drugs than someone who is already allowed to search persons and belongings. Don't bring drugs to an airport. Simple.

February 1, 2016 at 3:38 PM"
............................
So you have no regard for the Constitution of the United States or the Rule of Law?

TSA is authorized a limited administrative search for the sole purpose of finding Weapons, Explosives, and Incendiaries. Nothing more!
........................
"Flying is not a right; you have to do what the airlines want you to do in order to fly. So you have to put up with a little inconvenience, it’s worth it to keep passengers safe. If you don’t like what TSA is doing, then do the world a favor, DON’T FLY!!!!!!!!!

January 31, 2016 at 6:00 PM"
..................
Travel is in fact a right. This question has been litigated.

Agree that the passenger has to do what the "AIRLINES" want in order to fly but that does not give government a right to interfere in a persons right to travel without Due Process.

TSA and its employees more resemble a criminal organization than it does a federal agency that works for the public.

Both posters quoted, probably the same person, seem to have little knowledge of how peoples rights trump government control.

Wintermute said...

Hello Anonymous (you made mistakes which reveal who you are)... You are wrong... Flying IS a right, as codified in both case law and actual legislation. So before you deride others for making stuff up, make sure you are not, indeed, making stuff up yourself.

Anonymous said...

To the Feb 3, 3:38 A.M. commenter who sees nothing wrong with the DEA secretly hiring a TSA screener to look for drugs:

Did you read the document? The TSA screener would have been PAID on top of his regular salary if he'd actually found any drugs and he was working for TWO gov't depts at the same time. This is not appropriate for ANY gov't dept or employee to do.

Anonymous said...

Anony got it wrong by saying "..Flying is not a right; you have to do what the airlines want you to do in order to fly. "

I will happily do what the airlines tell me to do. I did not, however, buy my ticket from the TSA so why are they between me and my flight?

If you can't handle the real world then maybe you are the one who should skip the flying.