Thursday, January 21, 2016

TSA 2015 Year in Review



TSA had a busy year in 2015: 

TSA officers screened 708,316,339 million passengers (more than 1.9 million per day), which is 40,780,330 million more passengers than for the same timeframe in 2014.

In addition to screening more than 708 million passengers, TSA officers also screened 1.6 billion carry-on bags, 432 million checked bags and 12.9 million airport employees

Federal air  marshals flew more than a billion miles this past year keeping the skies safe. 

The TSA Pre® application program has reached a new milestone with more than 2 million travelers enrolled. TSA Pre®, which opened its first application center in December 2013, now has more than 350 application centers nationwide, including locations at 38 airports.

Nationwide, less than two percent of passengers waited in line longer than 20 minutes. 

44 percent of passengers screened in 2015 received some form of expedited screening.


To improve passenger engagement, TSA updated the look and functionality of tsa.gov and launched a new customer service initiative on Twitter, @AskTSA.


Amongst other notable mentions and accolades, TSA’s Instagram account was named the fourth out of 100 best accounts to follow by Rolling Stone Magazine. To date, the account has grown to nearly 400,000 followers.


Also significant, 2,653 firearms were discovered in carry-on bags at checkpoints across the country, averaging more than seven firearms per day. Of those, 2,198 (83 percent) were loaded. Firearms were intercepted at a total of 236 airports; 12 more airports than last year. There was a 20 percent increase in firearm discoveries from 2014’s total of 2,212. Pictured are just some of the firearms discovered in 2015.


Top 10 airports for gun catches in 2015

Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (DFW): 153
Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport (ATL): 144
George Bush Intercontinental Airport - Houston (IAH): 100
Denver International Airport  (DEN): 90
Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport  (PHX): 73
Nashville International Airport  (BNA): 59
Seattle-Tacoma International  Airport  (SEA): 59
Dallas Love Field Airport  (DAL): 57
Austin-Bergstrom International Airport (AUS): 54
William P. Hobby Airport  (HOU): 52


In addition to firearms discovered this year, there were many hazardous items that passengers attempted to travel with this year including:


Ten tubes of black powder were discovered in a checked bag at Salt Lake City (SLC). Black powder is prohibited from both carry-on and checked baggage.


Two pounds of gun powder and 600 rounds of ammunition were discovered in a checked bag at the Richmond International Airport (RIC).
Black powder was also discovered this year at Denver (DEN), Houston (IAH), Savannah (SAV) and Boston (BOS). Live smoke grenades were discovered this year at Las Vegas (LAS), Tucson (TUS),  Austin (AUS),  Columbus (CMH), Tulsa (TUL) and Madison (MSN).

A live flashbang grenade was discovered in a carry-on bag at Phoenix (PHX). Flashbang grenades were also discovered this year at Ft. Walton (VPS) and Jackson (JAN).
These are just a few of the hazardous items discovered in 2015.
These are just a few of the incidents where ammunition was discovered in carry-on bags.

Officers also find inert items that appear very realistic. The problem with these types of items is that we don’t know if they are real, toys or replicas until TSA explosives experts are called upon. Inert items can lead to disruption, closed terminals and checkpoints, which often result in canceled or delayed flights. Here are some of the more interesting inert items found last year:


A checked bag at Seattle (SEA) belonging to an active duty military passenger contained two-feet of replica demolition cord, two blocks of replica Semtex and four blocks of replica C4. Inert IED training aids are never permitted in carry-on or checked bags.
 


TSA officers also discovered: Replica sticks of dynamite at Las Vegas (LAS), a  scale model of an explosive drilling device at Houston Intercontinental (IAH),  an inert 120mm tank round at Reno (RNO),  an inert artillery round at Washington - Dulles (IAD),  an inert mortar round at San Antonio (SAT), an inert 81mm mortar round  at Great Falls (GFT), a realistic replica stick of dynamite at Honolulu (HNL),  an inert grenade projectile at Tampa (TPA),  an inert mortar shell  at Austin (AUS), an inert rocket propelled grenade at Raleigh-Durham (RDU), a practice landmine at Boston (BOS),  a replica 30 mm projectile at Kansas City (MCI), a replica Claymore mine at Las Vegas (LAS), and an inert anti-tank projectile at Tulsa (TUL).

These are some of the inert grenades discovered in 2015.

There were many instances last year when travelers attempted to hide items, or the items they packed were disguised to look like other items. TSA officers regularly find sword canes, credit card knives, belt buckle knives, comb/brush knives, knives hidden in shoes, knives hidden in thermoses and knives hidden under the bag lining near the handle mechanism. Here are a few instances that stood out: 


A knife was discovered in a traveler’s carry-on bag at Jacksonville (JAX). He was permitted to leave the checkpoint so he could place the knife in his car. The knife was discovered again upon his return taped to a fishing lure.

A non-metallic knife was discovered concealed under a passenger’s pants during a pat-down at Lihue (LIH).


A folding credit card knife was discovered concealed in a cardboard instant coffee container in a carry-on bag at Bishop International (FNT).

A knife wrapped in a computer power cord was detected at Ketchikan (KTN).

Two knives were discovered inside a hidden compartment in the sole of a shoe at Wichita (ICT).

An Orlando (MCO) traveler concealed two handguns, one unassembled rifle, and an unidentified amount of ammunition inside three amplifiers in a checked bag.

A concealed disassembled .22 caliber firearm was discovered at Daytona Beach (DAB). The frame of the gun was concealed in saw blades and the cylinder was mixed in with socket wrenches in a checked bag. The grip and firing pin were discovered in the carry-on bag inside a shaving kit.

A knife was detected under the cushion of a child safety seat at New Orleans (MSY).

These are some of the cane swords and stun canes that were discovered in 2015.


While TSA works to keep dangerous items off of commercial aircraft, when contraband is found, it must be reported to local law enforcement. Here are a couple of the more interesting narcotics discoveries:


A D-size battery with a screw-off top was discovered at Tulsa (TUL). A small amount of marijuana was inside of the battery.

Marijuana concealed in candy wrappers was discovered in a carry-on bag last week at the Newark Liberty International Airport (EWR).
Various incidents involving narcotics last year. Some are hidden while others are in plain sight.


Our officers discover thousands upon thousands of sharp items in carry-on bags. Here are some of the many sharp items discovered in 2015. 






The year also provided the need for travelers to surrender a few odd items:


A sickle was discovered in a carry-on bag at Newark (EWR).


An 8-inch double-edged knife was concealed and detected in a replica statue of the Eiffel Tower in a carry-on bag at Oakland (OAK).
 
A monster with a grenade was discovered at Eagle County (EGE).



A novelty grenade fishing lure was discovered at Anchorage (ANC).

Ay, Chihuahua! It’s always important to double check your bags before traveling, especially to make sure your Chihuahua hasn’t stowed away inside one of them. That’s exactly what happened at New York’s LaGuardia (LGA) Airport. While resolving a checked baggage alarm, an officer was shocked when he found a dog in the bag! Apparently, the dog climbed in while its owner was packing her suitcase. TSA worked with the airline to identify the owner, and the two were happily reunited.

Link’s master sword (Legend of Zelda) was discovered in a traveler’s carry-on bag at Oakland (OAK).

An inert cannonball was discovered in a checked bag at Lexington (LEX).

A weapon resembling a Klingon bat'leth was discovered in a carry-on bag at San Juan (SJU).

A speargun was discovered in a carry-on bag at Salt Lake City (SLC).

A jawbone tomahawk and an inert pineapple grenade were discovered in a carry-on bag at Las Vegas (LAS).

A meat slicer was discovered in a carry-on bag at the Southwest Florida International Airport (RSW).

These novelty bottles of bath salts topped with wax-covered lids and fuses were discovered in a checked bag at the Denver International Airport (DEN) and resulted in a 20-minute evacuation while bomb specialists cleared the items. What looked like possible explosives were just wedding souvenirs. The bride and groom’s names both start with "T"; thus "TNT.”

These Ninja climbing claws were discovered in a carry-on bag at  Savannah/Hilton Head (SAV).

One round of ammunition and OxyContin were discovered inside this cane at Las Vegas (LAS).
TSA officers discovered Batarangs this year at several airports around the nation.
This samurai sword was discovered attached to a compound bow in a carry-on bag at Austin (AUS).
This is just a few of the containers of bear mace discovered in 2015.
Thanks for reading this year’s run down of the more notable items TSA officers discovered in 2015. Keep in mind that far more was discovered than those listed in this report. When bag searches are needed, the line slows down. If you haven’t read them yet, make sure you check out our year in review posts for 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014.  
 
Follow @TSABlogTeam on Twitter and Instagram

Bob Burns
TSA Blog Team 


https://twitter.com/asktsa





48 comments:

Anonymous said...

As a travel agent it is reassuring to the travel industry that TSA is trying to do their best at catching all the things that could harm the crew and others. Thank you for your commitment to safety and putting your own lives on the line to help keep us safe.

Anonymous said...

How many passengers suffered needless and invasive physical pat-downs thanks to false positives on your naked body scanner technology?

Is that number greater or smaller than the number of genuinely dangerous items discovered through the use of the naked body scanners?

Of the genuinely dangerous items found with the naked body scanners, how many would have been detected by a walk-through metal detector?

Anonymous said...

"TSA officers screened 708,316,339 million passengers (more than 1.9 million per day)"

"2,653 firearms were discovered in carry-on bags at checkpoints across the country, averaging more than seven firearms per day."
........................................................

The number of firearms per passenger stated as a percent:

.0000037455% firearms per person.

Number of terrorist found by TSA=0.0%

TSA crowing about finding drugs tells us that TSA is engaged in illegal searches. The Administrative Search carve out must be limited to finding WEI. Time to pull the plug on TSA since obeying the law seems to not be possible for this agency.

All for the measly sum of $8,0000,000,000.00 yearly.

NumberLove said...

2653 guns / 708,316,339 million passengers = .00037% of all people who flew last year was caught by TSA with a gun. The percentage is actually lower because some people were carrying multiple weapons. NOT SIGNIFICANT

Bob failed to state that TSA screeners missed 95% of the 53,060 weapons that went through their screening areas in 2015.

Bob failed to state that several of the photos he posted this past year were reused at least once.

Bob failed to state that the TSA has NEVER found a person carrying a weapon into the airport was a terrorist or had any plans to be a terrorist or use the weapon to commit a crime in the airport or on a plane.

Bob failed to state that TSA's air marshals are wasting tax dollars by sitting in first class and have NEVER stopped a terrorist. The US Congress needs to cut the air marshals program completely out.

Bob failed to state the number of TSA employees disciplined, fired, arrested, or convicted of theft, assault, rape, and other serious crimes against the flying public.

This "Year in Review" is seriously flawed because it is missing such important data and statistics.

Anonymous said...

Bob, are you going to blog about how the DEA inappropriately hired a TSA screener to work as a confidential source to look for drugs in passengers' luggage and bodies.

Bob and West have repeatedly stated that TSA screeners are NOT looking for drugs.

In fact, since drugs are NOT Weapons, Explosives, nor Incendiaries, the TSA is NOT supposed to be looking for them at all. (Should drugs be found in the course of looking for WEI, the screener is expected to report the finding to real law enforcement.)

https://oig.justice.gov/reports/2016/f160107b.pdf

"The Department of Justice (DOJ) Office of the Inspector General (OIG) initiated this investigation upon the receipt of information from the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) that a Transportation Security Administration (TSA) airport Security Screener had been registered as a paid Confidential Source (CS) for the DEA."

Anonymous said...


Can we assume that ALL of the travelers trying to bring these items through TSA checkpoints were arrested and charged with crimes? What were the final punishments, if any? Thank you for keeping us safe, TSA!

Anonymous said...

We know you may not be perfect but thank you for your continued vigilance, TSA.

...No valid reason for a civilian to carry a loaded gun or other dangerous weapon onto a passenger plane. You're an unauthorized (often concealed-) armed person on an airplane. Period.

Susan Richart said...

Please stop perpetuating the myth that screeners are "officers" when they are nothing more than clerks.

Any how many weapons went undetected by the OIG's testers? Wasn't the number 95%?

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Skin Horse said...

I spent the $85.00 for the TSA pre check in 2013 and have a known traveler number. Since then, it is exceedingly rare that get TSA Pre on a boarding pass when I fly and almost never get it on both legs of a round trip. As this has proven an ineffective system for me, I wonder if TSA would consider a partial refund. I would not consider renewing after the 5 year term.

Anonymous said...

I paid for Pre Check and have been frustrated with it a lot lately. More and more often, the Pre Check lanes are closed. I'm not at the airport at odd times either. Sometimes I get to keep my shoes on in the regular lane, but I'm still wasting my time in the regular lanes. I know I'm not going to get Pre Check every time I fly, but I expect the lanes to be open more often than not, especially when I paid for the service.

Anonymous said...

Aloha If the knife was taken, What about all the other dangerous knives on board. Should they also not taken? If not why not?

Anonymous said...

I would like my freedom back. I am sorry that you are afraid but the company that makes the scanners did their best to convince you all that planes are unsafe and the TSA is all about getting people used to illegal search and seizure. So for those too afraid to live in the real world, know that you made is less safe and less free. If you change freedom for false security you are part of the problem.

Anonymous said...

All that stuff found but not a single Terrorist. Not even a hint of a Terrorist. Are you sure you know what you are looking for?

Anonymous said...

Tsa thanks for keeping us safe from the other crazy passengers who think they need to bring guns & knifes on board.

Anonymous said...

"Anonymous said...

Tsa thanks for keeping us safe from the other crazy passengers who think they need to bring guns & knifes on board."

Do you have any idea of the number of "guns & knives" the TSA misses? How many times have you been injured by those "crazy" passengers who boarded with their guns and knives?

screen shot

Anonymous said...

The security in the US is excessive and inefficient. I flew back from Paris two weeks after their attacks and was through security quickly. I didn't have to remove my shoes and I went through the metal detector. The entire process took less than 5 minutes. Their checkpoint had fewer then half the workers of what a typical TSA checkpoint uses. Compare that to the US where I'm generally waiting 20+ minutes because everybody has to disrobe, remove their shoes, go through the slower body scanners, and wait for someone to pat them down because the body scanner alarmed on nothing.

The flights are just as safe in the other countries with far less invasive screening, faster screening, and more polite employees. Also they don't freak out about a corkscrew. I have one without a blade and the TSA always has to inspect it. Even if it had a blade, what is anybody going to be able to do with a 1" long blade, that couldn't be done with larger scissors that are allowed onboard?

Richard L. said...

Thank you TSA. Frequent flyers like myself do not have a problem with security. I travel about three dozen times per year and have no problem with TSA. I am generally through security lines with 15 minutes, no complaints. Aviation transportation has never been safer.

JJ said...

Honestly you "anonymous" people are kind of pathetic. Do you really have nothing else better to do with your day than harass the poster of a TSA Blog? If you want change do something, don't just whine about it on a TSA Blog, you are pretty sad.

Anonymous said...

Thanks TSA for allowing me to feel more relaxed when I travel. Rules are rules. I've been searched and patted down going through airport lines. It's part of flying and your position of Defending Americans. I have no complaints for what you do.

Anonymous said...

True that the vast majority of passengers do not bring a prohibited item aboard the aircraft, but the percentage that do attempt to could potentially hurt quite a many passengers and crew.... Those attempting to board with live grenades, black powder and ogre types of explosives cloud have brought a plane down. It goes to show how vigilant the officers at TSA are and I appreciate them keeping these items of of the aircraft... BTW how do you know that TSA hasn't caught a terrorist? Do you think a terrorist is going to openly admit they are part of terrorist organization X and we're trying to take down an airplane?

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...

We know you may not be perfect but thank you for your continued vigilance, TSA.

...No valid reason for a civilian to carry a loaded gun or other dangerous weapon onto a passenger plane. You're an unauthorized (often concealed-) armed person on an airplane. Period.
January 21, 2016 at 9:40 PM
-------------------------------------------
no valid reason for our own government to prohibit law-abiding citizens from exercising their civil rights, as protected by the Second Amendment. TSA misses 19 or 20 for every firearm they find, so you've already traveled many times with people carrying "unauthorized" firearms, and no planes have fallen from the sky, no people have gone nuts & started shooting, no terrorists have been found, & we're wasting $8 BILLION a year on this nonsense.

Anonymous said...

Please stop perpetuating the myth that screeners are "officers" when they are nothing more than clerks.

they are by all accounts as much Officers as anyone else. They are by definition officers. They are recognized by law as Officers. Try assaulting one and see what the charges are. It will be Assault on a Federal Officer. That you choose to ignore does not make it so. You may think you are cute or insulting them by calling them clerks the reality is, you are just showing your distain and ignorance to the facts.

Susan Richart said...

Interesting that 3 pro-TSA comments were posted consecutively. Two were posted 4 minutes apart and the 3rd one about 90 minutes later. Like I said, interesting.

JJ, many of us ARE doing something by educating others on how ineffective TSA security really is, on how it is only theater to make you feel safe, not actually be safe.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

GSOLTSO said...

Anon sez - "Can we assume that ALL of the travelers trying to bring these items through TSA checkpoints were arrested and charged with crimes? What were the final punishments, if any? Thank you for keeping us safe, TSA!"

No, not all of them are charged or arrested. The choice of charging/arresting is left up to the local LEOs discretion. As for final punishments, that is also something determined by the local judicial system. TSA *may* issue fines in relation to certain items, but that is a separate civil fine, not a charge or arrest.

You are welcome!

Anon sez - "As a travel agent it is reassuring to the travel industry that TSA is trying to do their best at catching all the things that could harm the crew and others. Thank you for your commitment to safety and putting your own lives on the line to help keep us safe."

Thank you for the kind words, and you are welcome!

Anon sez - "Bob and West have repeatedly stated that TSA screeners are NOT looking for drugs.

In fact, since drugs are NOT Weapons, Explosives, nor Incendiaries, the TSA is NOT supposed to be looking for them at all. (Should drugs be found in the course of looking for WEI, the screener is expected to report the finding to real law enforcement.)"

TSOs do not specifically look for drugs - however "Should drugs be found in the course of looking for WEI, the screener is expected to report the finding to real law enforcement". I have never gone into a bag looking for drugs specifically, and the regulations prohibit it.

Anon sez - "All that stuff found but not a single Terrorist. Not even a hint of a Terrorist. Are you sure you know what you are looking for?"

The images in this post give a pretty good indicator of what we are looking for (Weapons, Explosives, Incendiaries - WEI), as well as some illegal items that are found while looking for the WEI.

Anon sez - "Thanks TSA for allowing me to feel more relaxed when I travel. Rules are rules. I've been searched and patted down going through airport lines. It's part of flying and your position of Defending Americans. I have no complaints for what you do."

You are welcome!

Richard L sez - "Thank you TSA. Frequent flyers like myself do not have a problem with security. I travel about three dozen times per year and have no problem with TSA. I am generally through security lines with 15 minutes, no complaints. Aviation transportation has never been safer."

You are welcome!

Susan sez - "Interesting that 3 pro-TSA comments were posted consecutively. Two were posted 4 minutes apart and the 3rd one about 90 minutes later. Like I said, interesting."

We get pro and less than pro comments all the time. Sometimes we get pro comments in a row, sometimes we get less than pro comments in a row.

West
TSA Blog Team

SelfDefenseGuru said...

Are these people insane? Who seriously tries to travel with this type of stuff. If you even have to think about bringing it on the plane it is a big red flag that you should NOT bring it on the plane. Keep up the good work TSA!

Anonymous said...

The Bold TSApologist spaketh:

they are by all accounts as much Officers as anyone else. They are by definition officers. They are recognized by law as Officers. Try assaulting one and see what the charges are. It will be Assault on a Federal Officer. That you choose to ignore does not make it so. You may think you are cute or insulting them by calling them clerks the reality is, you are just showing your distain and ignorance to the facts.

1. "Anyone else" is NOT an officer.
2. No TSA screener is "by definition" an officer. He is a screening clerk.
3. There is no law recognizing TSA screeners as "officers."
4. Why do you want to assault TSA employees? I thought you were their cheerleader.
5. Any charge brought upon someone like you who assaults a government employee would be "assault of a federal employee."
6. You keep ignoring the truth, Bold TSApologist, but it doesn't make the truth go away.
7. It is neither cute nor insulting to call a TSA screener a "screener," "clerk," "agent," "employee," etc. It's a fact.
8. No one who uses any of the terms listed in item 7 is showing disdain or ignorance of the facts. You can't make up your own facts to fit your pro-TSA agenda.

Fix The TSA said...

The year in review montage of guns has the same images used multiple times. My analysis so far sees four guns used at least twice.

Anonymous said...

The Bold TSApologist spaketh:

they are by all accounts as much Officers as anyone else. They are by definition officers. They are recognized by law as Officers. Try assaulting one and see what the charges are. It will be Assault on a Federal Officer. That you choose to ignore does not make it so. You may think you are cute or insulting them by calling them clerks the reality is, you are just showing your distain and ignorance to the facts.

1. "Anyone else" is NOT an officer.
2. No TSA screener is "by definition" an officer. He is a screening clerk. false. They are sworn officers and take an oath of office. sadly not all obey but neither does our president
3. There is no law recognizing TSA screeners as "officers." a legal definition
4. Why do you want to assault TSA employees? I thought you were their cheerleader.
5. Any charge brought upon someone like you who assaults a government employee would be "assault of a federal employee." false
6. You keep ignoring the truth, Bold TSApologist, but it doesn't make the truth go away.
7. It is neither cute nor insulting to call a TSA screener a "screener," "clerk," "agent," "employee," etc. It's a fact. It is a fact they are Federal Officers. I'm sure they don't really care what they are called. You however choose to do it as an insult, that I find childish.
8. No one who uses any of the terms listed in item 7 is showing disdain or ignorance of the facts. You can't make up your own facts to fit your pro-TSA agenda. I Have no agenda. But many here do. Notice how many add cute little names.."clerk" "TSApologist" why do some need to add little titles if not to stir up a response. People can disagree, but why do it like a 3 yr old?
Call people what you wish, it doesn't make it so. It doesn't change the facts. It just shows ignorance, distain and a certain level of immaturity.

Susan Richart said...

Boldy, TSA sceeners take the same oath as ALL other civil servants takes; they do NOT take a special oath, such as the military or federal LEOs take.

What does "legal definition" mean? The TSA reclassified screeners as "officers" -there is no legal definition about it.

If you can find such a "legal definition" to share with us, I am sure it would be much appreciated. You never can back up your assertions with fact, but give it a try this time.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

RB said...

"2. No TSA screener is "by definition" an officer. He is a screening clerk. false. They are sworn officers and take an oath of office. sadly not all obey but neither does our president"

................................
TSA screener are not sworn "officers".

A sworn officer is a person who has authority to conduct daily law enforcement duties which includes power to arrest. Examples of sworn officers are Police Officers and other Law Enforcement Officers, and I think we can all agree that TSA screeners are not in that category. TSA Air Marshals are sworn officers and I believer there are a few other TSA positions that have law enforcment compnents.

I agree that TSA screeners are sworn, but only to the same "Oath" given by every federal government employee. There is a difference between a Sworn Officer and a federal employee taking an Oath. TSA screeners fall into the category of federal employee's taking an oath, nothing more.

Would you term all government employees "sworn officers"? And we can observe regular violation of that Oath when TSA screeners search for non-WEI things or when the TSA Blog team illegally censors speech.

There is no honor or integrity in TSA employees.

SSSS for some reason said...

Boldy is challenged and replies "..2. No TSA screener is "by definition" an officer. He is a screening clerk. false. They are sworn officers and take an oath of office. "

Incorrect. So very, very well incorrect. An Oath of Office does not make you an officer, it makes you an employee.

Anonymous said...

West, where is my reply to the Bold TSApologist? It was submitted on Feb 6, the same date as SSSS's. It met blog policies. Where is it? Delayed or deleted? If deleted, who deleted it and why?

Anonymous said...

Bold TSApologist,

Google "TSA screeners not officers" (without quotes).

I did and found several links to news articles, as well as government and legal websites.

I put direct links to several articles and web pages in a comment I submitted here on Friday, Feb 5, but West deleted it. Not sure why, since the comment met blog policy, the links were coded correctly, and were valid and on topic.

Anyway, it is easy for you to learn that TSA screeners or screening clerks are not sworn officers, such as law enforcement and the military.

Anonymous said...

Naked body scanner? As a former TSA officer, I can tell you your fears are misplaced. It does not render the false, detailed images bandied about the internet. Those are solarized, negative images of nudes for the most part. NO ONE at TSA cares what you look like anyway. They know more about you by looking through your bags than they would learn if you walked through the airport naked on your hands. They know what you do, who you do it to, what you use to do it with and whether you clean it or not. Most days they just want to go home and stick a brush in their ear and gently wash the days events off their brains. They perform a high profile and thankless job under the worst conditions. Despite the systemic incompetence and goals of thier management, they earnestly work in your best intrests. You may consider easing up off them a bit.

Anonymous said...

thanks for catching these items, I see a lot of ignorant people asking. "how many of these people carrying these objects were terrorist?" how do you know they aren't terrorist trying to cause harm to a flight or trying to test the system? the bottom line is that the officers job is to keep items that could be used for insidious purposes off the aircraft regardless of the intended purpose of having the item, thus rendering anyone who is planning on hurting an aircraft useless because the tools they need to kill someone has been taken away. asking how many terrorist has TSA caught is an impossible question to answer because terrorist don't usually expose themselves as such or release to the authorities their intentions, although I know that discovery of certain items such as grenades, high explosives, artfully concealed firearms and other dangerous weapons raise extra concern of a persons intnentions with such items, but its impossible to know if one is plotting to carry out a terrorist attack or simply trying to test the system to see if prohibited items can be passed through security undetected. bottom line is TSA is catching the prohibited items, a terrorist is no good without the tools of his trade, thank you TSA officers for your hard work and comittment

Fix the TSA said...

@ "Former TSA Screener":

If you were a TSA screener, then you know the scanners take and store a revealing image, whether or not it is displayed on the Gumby screen. This violates our bodies and privacy.

Your comments about what government employees think and do when pawing through our private property is disgusting and patronizing.

If you actually were a TSA screener, I am glad you are one no longer

Unknown said...

TSA keeps touting home many guns they catch. My question is how many tries to use it? Its all about intent . Which is,why TSA needs to find a balance between technology and the human element. Stop trying to neutralize the behavior detection program and make it stronger and effective like it was on the beginning.

carl maccario said...

TSA keeps touting home many guns they catch. My question is how many tries to use it? Its all about intent . Which is,why TSA needs to find a balance between technology and the human element. Stop trying to neutralize the behavior detection program and make it stronger and effective like it was on the beginning.

Wintermute said...

Stop trying to neutralize the behavior detection program and make it stronger and effective like it was on the beginning.
--

The BDO program was never effective. It is based on junk science, and no more effective than random guessing.

Anonymous said...

i was wondering about fishing lures. is that allowed

Anonymous said...

TSA Precheck has become so disjointed that even though we have been Global Trusted Travelers for more than 5 years, we still only get TSA PreCheck about 1/2 of the time. Further, my husband is disabled and many times one of us gets TSA PreCheck and one doesn't. I cannot believe that after all these years, you can't make the system work appropriately.

Anonymous said...

Is the TSA as effective as they could be, maybe not. Saying they are ineffective, is a stupid, better yet moronic comment. They are showing us pictures and numbers that would indicate things are being found and removed. I for one feel a little bit safer knowing some yahoo may have been intercepted before boarding a pane with a loaded gun. Could you imagine a shootout at 30,000 feet. Some nut with bear spray or a percussion bomb incapacitating the crew and possibly the pilots. Get a grip on reality people. Over 2000 potentially dangerous incidents were avoided last year.
As far as rights, why should any nut job with a loaded spear gun have the right to endanger our safety. We could have a separate TSA free airport for the delusional survivalists out there that feel their rights are being violated. Enjoy your flight. I will stick with the TSA flights, especial now that the yahoo's will have their own airport to die I mean fly from. For those of you that still feel the earth is flat please take that extra step.

Montana Tartaruga said...

Although the TSA program is not perfect, I prefer it to no system at all. I've had the vast majority of the officers act in a professional and courteous manner - maybe because I treat them this way? All of the whining being posted begs the question, "If you don't like it, why fly?" Feel free to ride our nation's wonderful bus or train systems instead, or drive. And considering much how angrier communication has become between citizens in our nation and the degree to which aggression has increased between passengers jockeying for overhead baggage space I personally prefer to have as many loaded handguns as possible NOT traveling inside the plane with me.

Lowongan Kerja said...

Your comments about what government employees think and do when pawing through our private property is disgusting and patronizing.

Jared Palmer said...

What's really frightening is that some of this stuff is making it onto the planes and trains without being detected. Yet if I try to smuggle a bottle of rum back from Grand Cayman I'm getting caught for sure.

We're all glad the TSA exists, just wish people were all civilized and we didn't need this level of security.

Justsaying...... said...

After seeing ALL of THESE confiscated and you are actually questioning security??? I would put you on the traveling pat down list for sure!!!!! Your fishy!!!

Anonymous said...

Thank you TSA. You have a tough job. You do it well. Appreciate your hrs work.

Vicki Nikolaidis said...

Whew! These items are frightening. Thank you for your work! - to all the professional TSA workers who find these horrid items. I really was not aware of the magnitude of this issue.
I love the story about the little dog, that could happen in our family too. What a surprise for the owner!