Friday, December 18, 2015

TSA Week in Review: December 11 – 17

34 firearms were discovered this week in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 34 firearms discovered, 31 were loaded and 20 had a round chambered. All of the firearms pictured here were discovered this week. See a complete list below.


If an item looks like a real bomb, grenade, mine, etc., it is prohibited. When these items are found at a checkpoint or in checked baggage, they can cause significant delays because the explosives detection professionals must respond to resolve the alarm. Even if they are novelty items, you are prohibited from bringing them on board the aircraft.
Two inert/novelty grenades were discovered this week in carry-on bags at Phoenix–Mesa Gateway (IWA) and Dayton (DAY).
A realistic replica stick of dynamite was discovered in checked baggage at Honolulu (HNL).

Three road flares were discovered in carry-on bags at Austin (AUS) and Billings (BIL). Fireworks were discovered in carry-on bags at Fort Lauderdale (FLL) and Sacramento (SMF). These hazmat items are strictly prohibited from both carry-on and checked bags.
A comb knife was discovered in a carry-on bag at Detroit (DTW). All knives are prohibited from carry-on bags, and concealed knives can lead to fines and arrest. 
Clockwise from the top, these knives and stars were discovered at JFK, SNA, BOI, LAS, ORD, SNA, LAS, BWI and SAN
When packed properly, ammunition can be transported in your checked baggage, but it is never permissible to pack ammo in your carry-on bag. The ammunition pictured was discovered in a carry-on bag at Oakland (OAK).


In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly in carry-on bags, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons, stun guns, small pocketknives and many other prohibited items too numerous to note.

You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline. 
Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $11,000. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions; that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates. 

Read our 2014 Year in Review post! If you haven’t read them yet, make sure you check out our year in review posts for 2011, 2012 and 2013.

Follow @TSA on Twitter and Instagram! 

Bob Burns
TSA Social Media Team



https://twitter.com/asktsa

57 comments:

Sharon Captain said...

Wow!! This is unreal with everything that is happening. I hope nothing get through.

Anonymous said...

All semblance of this website being anything other than busywork for Bob is gone, as well as a place for West to peacock. How much has it cost us taxpayer to support this so-called blog that was supposed to "communicate with the public about all things TSA related"?

screen shot

RB said...

 Sharon Captain said...Wow!! This is unreal with everything that is happening. I hope nothing get through.

TSA screeners have been shown to miss 95% of target objects by DHS OIG staff.

Anonymous said...

Can we assume the weapons are tested for crime connections?

Clinton Becker said...

What exactly does the tsa do with confiscated guns?

RB said...

Anonymous said...Can we assume the weapons are tested for crime connections?December 19, 2015 at 8:42 AM

TSA screeners are not law enforcement and have no authority to do any kind of investigations of this type.

The fact that TSA Screeners miss 95% of target test objects in test by the DHS OIG should make everyone question how many real threats TSA screeners miss.

But the bright side, TSA screeners are good a confiscating harmless toys like little plastic hammers and Buzz Lightyear Grippers, and a sockmonkeys tiny 1 inch gun.

TSA screeners also seem to be well trained in letting drug dealers move drugs through TSA checkpoints when they get their palms greased.

Sipadan Diver said...

Hi, we're not sure if this is the right place to post this but according to this article on your website (http://blog.tsa.gov/2013/05/tsa-travel-tips-tuesday-its-time-to-go.html) we should store our regulators and dive computers in our carry-on baggage but according to our friend and also one of the comments on the above mentioned post on your website, we may not be allowed to do so. Can we please get some confirmation on this. Thank you.

Bob Burns (TSA Blog Team) said...

Sipadan Diver,


You may bring regulators, buoyancy compensators and masks, snorkels and fins as carry-on or checked baggage. If you have any further questions about your dive gear, please contact our @AskTSA team via twitter, or reach out to our contact center at (866) 289-9673, or TSA-ContactCenter@tsa.dhs.gov

Thanks!

Bob Burns
TSA Social Media Team

Bob Burns (TSA Blog Team) said...

Clinton Becker,

If firearms are confiscated, they're taken by law enforcement officers, not TSA. You would need to contact your local airport police department to see what happens to them after confiscation.

Thanks,

Bob Burns
TSA Social Media Team

RB said...

Bob Burns (TSA Blog Team) said...Sipadan Diver, You may bring regulators, buoyancy compensators and masks, snorkels and fins as carry-on or checked baggage. If you have any further questions about your dive gear, please contact our @AskTSA team via twitter, or reach out to our contact center at (866) 289-9673, or TSA-ContactCenter@tsa.dhs.govThanks!Bob BurnsTSA Social Media Team December 20, 2015 at 12:48 PM
?.......l.l..?

You can do as Bob Burns says until some TSA Screener at the checkpoint you are trying to clear decides differently. The checkpoint screeners can decide to not allow any item, for any reason, that they decide upon and you have no right or means to challenge that decision.

Best bet is to ship your valuable dive gear and not bet on TSA.

CliffOnTheRoad said...

This blog entry of Sunday, 12/20 so far contains 9 comments under the heading of: week Dec 11=17.

Because I expect Anonomus to again ask his weekly "active duty military" question, I want to point out 2 things: 1. A response to that question is in the previous weeks blog for Dec 4-10.

2. There are only 4 comments in that Week of Dec 4-10 blog, yet I wish it to be known NO postings had been approved as recently as Saturday 12/19 when I last looked.

I include #2 above because the answer to Anonomus, sent on 12/12, could not have been seen when Anon reposted his question on 12/18. I thought the whole blog team had gone on vacation. I also did not find this weeks blog, dated 12/18, when I looked for it on 12/19.

Anonymous said...

As always, absolutely nothing you needed your slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners to detect. Meanwhile, how many people suffered physical searches thanks to false alarms on these useless machines?

Why are Curtis Burns and West Cooper unwilling to address, let alone answer, that question?

How many weeks has it been since you last trumpeted something dangerous you found with the naked body scanners?

Anonymous said...

It's only your money... http://www.forbes.com/sites/georgeleef/2014/10/09/tsa-boondoggles-high-costs-low-effectiveness-but-its-only-your-money/

Wintermute said...

I believe Anon is looking for an answer from someone at TSA. Are you speaking for the TSA in your answer? Or just guessing? Since you only answered part of the question, and not well, it's kinda hard to tell ;)

RB said...

Anonymous CliffOnTheRoad said...
This blog entry of Sunday, 12/20 so far contains 9 comments under the heading of: week Dec 11=17.

Because I expect Anonomus to again ask his weekly "active duty military" question, I want to point out 2 things: 1. A response to that question is in the previous weeks blog for Dec 4-10.

2. There are only 4 comments in that Week of Dec 4-10 blog, yet I wish it to be known NO postings had been approved as recently as Saturday 12/19 when I last looked.

I include #2 above because the answer to Anonomus, sent on 12/12, could not have been seen when Anon reposted his question on 12/18. I thought the whole blog team had gone on vacation. I also did not find this weeks blog, dated 12/18, when I looked for it on 12/19.

December 21, 2015 at 12:24 AM

.................
Your response to that question is unsupported by actual documents nor is it from a TSA representative.

Adrian said...

So we're no longer going to be allowed to opt out of the invasive, wasteful, and unreliable AIT machines?

http://www.dhs.gov/sites/default/files/publications/privacy-tsa-pia-32-d-ait.pdf

SSSS for some reason said...

"...When these items are found at a checkpoint or in checked baggage, they can cause significant delays because the explosives detection professionals must respond to resolve the alarm."

When? Where? How often? And what were the results?

I ask because I can find no evidence of these explosives detection professionals responding to anything anywhere. FOIA requests have turned up zero instances of these professionals being called up to respond to the any of the inert grenades or other devices posted in this blog over the last year.

Are they the same people who won't let you take water through security because it might be dangerous but then throw the bottle away in a simple rubbish bin because its not like it is dangerous or anything?

Anonymous said...

CliffOnTheRoad said...
This blog entry of Sunday, 12/20 so far contains 9 comments under the heading of: week Dec 11=17.

Because I expect Anonomus to again ask his weekly "active duty military" question, I want to point out 2 things: 1. A response to that question is in the previous weeks blog for Dec 4-10.

No. The response was not part of the previous weeks blog.

The response you mention was in the comment section and cane from you, and from a source you claim as valid.

Thank you for sharing whatever it is you think you shared, but the question was not answered. Why are retired military personnel, who have been vetted multiple times over and proven themselves over and over again, excluded from the precheck system?

Anonymous said...

Wow, you're answering questions this month, Bob? You haven't done that in months! You trying to improve your performance review before the end of year?

(Wonder if this comment will be approved and if Bob replies?)

Anonymous said...

TSA blotter team - the TSA on Dec 18 changed the rules on opting out of the nude-o-scope (millimeter wave) scanners. Why wasn't this information publicized? You are the "social media team." Where are your tweets, blog posts, instagrams, etc.?

Now, screeners can profile and force anyone choosing the public grope to go through those overly-revealing machines.

I don't care if the naked image isn't displayed in public. The scan is made and stored for an unknown amount of time. The image can be viewed by TSA employees with access to the scanner computer (and a password?). The revealing images can be downloaded or transferred over a network by TSA employees and/or contractors, otherwise, there could be no testing or review of work & systems, and no evidence in case of a criminal incident.

Forcing people with insulin pumps, with the inability to hold their arms up, etc. into the nudie scanners with no other legitimate recourse is grotesque, and I hope sooner than later is judged unConstitutional.

Anonymous said...

Looks like no one on the so-called social media team worked more than one day this week. Okay, it's the holidays, but it would be amazingly simple for the team to let us know they have no intention of approving any comments for several days, much beyond the alleged 24 - 72 hours approval time West had claimed is their policy.

You have a blog. Manage readers' and commenters' expectations. Right now, we have to guess whether our comments have been deleted or if they will sit in the queue for a week or two; then eventually show up.

The comment approval job has been really slacking the past few months. A team of people should be able to approval the one to four comments that sit in the queue each day much more quickly. Deleting the spam doesn't take much time if you do it right.

Stop ignoring the US taxpayers for whom this blog is written. Let us know beforehand when the team has a legitimate reason for delayed comment approval.

Anonymous said...

West, I posted a comment on the November 18 blog post that needs approval. Thanks.

RB said...

Now that TSA has made Electronic Strip Searches mandatory what happens if the traveler declines the Electronic Strip Search and TSA declines to do a Body Grope. Can the traveler exit the security line and go home without penalty?

Example, an insulin pump manufacturer advises not using WBI. I would take the advice of the manufacturer since they are expert on their device and we all know that TSA and its screeners are expert in nothing.

I will not take the chance on ruining several thousand dollars of medical equipment and would choose to not fly that day instead of satisfying TSA's unfounded, unreasonable suspicions.

RB said...

Anonymous said...
TSA blotter team - the TSA on Dec 18 changed the rules on opting out of the nude-o-scope (millimeter wave) scanners. Why wasn't this information publicized? You are the "social media team." Where are your tweets, blog posts, instagrams, etc.?

Now, screeners can profile and force anyone choosing the public grope to go through those overly-revealing machines.

I don't care if the naked image isn't displayed in public. The scan is made and stored for an unknown amount of time. The image can be viewed by TSA employees with access to the scanner computer (and a password?). The revealing images can be downloaded or transferred over a network by TSA employees and/or contractors, otherwise, there could be no testing or review of work & systems, and no evidence in case of a criminal incident.

Forcing people with insulin pumps, with the inability to hold their arms up, etc. into the nudie scanners with no other legitimate recourse is grotesque, and I hope sooner than later is judged unConstitutional.

December 23, 2015 at 10:26 AM
.........................................
I think the better question is why TSA doesn't think they have to comply with the nations law, specifically the Administrative Procedures Act where this type of change should be first posted, public comments taken, then formulating policy.

Of course TSA has never complied with the Administrative Procedures Act for the Strip Search Machines even after being ordered by a Federal Court to do so multiple times.

When government won't comply with the laws of the land why should it expect citizens to comply?

TSA is a disgrace to the world. Anyone who works for TSA is truly not working for the good of the citizens of this country and should be ashamed.

RB said...

Anonymous Anonymous said...
Looks like no one on the so-called social media team worked more than one day this week. Okay, it's the holidays, but it would be amazingly simple for the team to let us know they have no intention of approving any comments for several days, much beyond the alleged 24 - 72 hours approval time West had claimed is their policy.

You have a blog. Manage readers' and commenters' expectations. Right now, we have to guess whether our comments have been deleted or if they will sit in the queue for a week or two; then eventually show up.

The comment approval job has been really slacking the past few months. A team of people should be able to approval the one to four comments that sit in the queue each day much more quickly. Deleting the spam doesn't take much time if you do it right.

Stop ignoring the US taxpayers for whom this blog is written. Let us know beforehand when the team has a legitimate reason for delayed comment approval.

December 24, 2015 at 9:31 AM

........................
Typical performance for TSA employees anywhere within TSA. A 95% failure rate is not an accident, TSA works hard for that 5%.

RB said...

TSA Media Spokesman Lisa Farbstein is blocking citizens from her offical TSA twitter feed. Is it TSA policy to only work for some citizens and not all citizens? Seems like a clear violation of government ethics policies not to mention professional standards of conduct.

Susan Richart said...

Just say "NO" to mandatory screening:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/lisabrownlee/2015/12/24/tsa-body-scan-just-say-no-leading-expert-says/

"He elaborated that “the last minute announcement by the TSA is troubling and appears contrary to the agency’s previous representations about the program and to the decision of the D.C. Circuit in EPIC v. DHS. In that case the DHS represented that the body scanner program was optional and that passenger could always elect to opt for a pat-down. The D.C. Circuit, relying on the government’s representation, concluded that there was therefore no Fourth Amendment violation, because as Judge (Douglas H.) Ginsburg explained for the court,

‘More telling, any passenger may opt-out of AIT screening in favor of a pat-down , which allows him to decide which of the two options for detecting a concealed, nonmetallic weapon or explosive is least invasive.’”

Thankfully, this illegal action by the TSA is already before the courts.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Anonymous said...

I don't care if the naked image isn't displayed in public. The scan is made and stored for an unknown amount of time. The image can be viewed by TSA employees with access to the scanner computer (and a password?). The revealing images can be downloaded or transferred over a network by TSA employees and/or contractors, otherwise, there could be no testing or review of work & systems, and no evidence in case of a criminal incident.

Do you just make this up as you go to fit your agenda? The "images" cannot be viewed as they do not exist. The AIT's have no ability to capture images. They bounce high frequency waves. The machines that could take images were removed from ALL airports years ago. But you knew that...

Susan Richart said...

Bob, why can one take a pecan pie on a plane, a pie that contains about 12 oz. of "gel" - the filling - but one can't take a 12 oz. jar of jam or jelly?

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Anonymous said...

CliffOnTheRoad said...
Because I expect Anonomus to again ask his weekly "active duty military" question, I want to point out 2 things: 1. A response to that question is in the previous weeks blog for Dec 4-10.


In that response, you said "However, TSA continues to identify additional trusted populations. As stated, each entity will undergo a risk assessment, followed by entry into an agreement with TSA which outlines both parties’ roles and responsibilities for partnering in the TSA PreĆ¼® program"

I'd like to ask what the heck the TSA has been doing for the last 14 years, if they are just now getting to do risk assessments on groups.

Oh, and why they think retired military people are an "entity" that they can enter into an agreement with.

RB said...

Anonymous said...
I don't care if the naked image isn't displayed in public. The scan is made and stored for an unknown amount of time. The image can be viewed by TSA employees with access to the scanner computer (and a password?). The revealing images can be downloaded or transferred over a network by TSA employees and/or contractors, otherwise, there could be no testing or review of work & systems, and no evidence in case of a criminal incident.

Do you just make this up as you go to fit your agenda? The "images" cannot be viewed as they do not exist. The AIT's have no ability to capture images. They bounce high frequency waves. The machines that could take images were removed from ALL airports years ago. But you knew that...December 25, 2015 at 9:00 AM

TSA's Bold Blotter Intern is either confused or misrepresenting the capabilities of TSA's Strp Search Machines. These are the same MMW Strip Search Machines that are required by contract to have the capability to store and transmit images over common computer networks. The only change was the addition of the privacy filters and the gumby viewer at the machine. What we don't know is if TSA is saving the raw image data but given the dishonesty of TSA overall I wouldn't be surprised to learn that TSA retains images of every person screened by Strip Search machine.

Anonymous said...

Yeah, Lisa Farbstein only wants to see kudos and puppies, so she blocks US taxpaying citizens Tweets to her.

She also refuses to answer questions from US taxpayers, such as if the people carrying the "good catches" she's crowing about were allowed to travel.

And don't forget this is the same Lisa Farbstein who violated the privacy of a passenger by mockingly posting a picture of his luggage with a large amount of cash, with no evidence at that time that ANY crime had occurred.

Anonymous said...

You are wrong, Boldy. Both the millimeter wave scanner and xray scanner can generate a very revealing image showing the victim's body under their clothing. The TSA itself posted low resolution versions of the images the millimeter wave scanners take! LOL! You know this. Why are you denying it?

As we have all pointed out to you dozens of times already, the scanners are required to be able to store scans/images by the very RFP specifications of the TSA! We've known this for years. The TSA has always refused to tell the US public how long they store the scans/images.

The scanner generates an image from the scan it takes. Face this fact. Look at the image your buddies here displayed. Understand it is a LOW resolution version of the actual image the nudeoscope scanners can generate.

Wintermute said...

Bold, read the RFP on the nude-o-scopes that are CURRENTLY in use, and then tell us you wouldn't infer that they have these capabilities. But you already k ow this, which is why you ignore comments refuting your supposed knowledge.

Concerned said...

Where do you send actual complaints to be read - not this horrible blog?

Anonymous said...

West, who posts the majority of the Tweets on the @tsa Twitter account?

Anonymous said...

@Bold TSApologist:

From a comment on a 2010 TSA blog post regarding the AIT strip search scanners:

" From Procurement and Operations Specs for WBI

3.1.1.1.2 Privacy …… Enabling and disabling of image filtering shall (11) be modifiable by users as defined in the User Access Levels and Capabilities appendix.

3.1.1.3.1.2 Test Mode

For purposes of testing, evaluation, and training development, the WBI shall (22) provide a Test Mode.

The WBI Test Mode shall (23) be the sole mode of operation permitting the exporting of image data.

WBI Test Mode shall (24) be accessible as provided in the User Access Levels and Capabilities appendix.

(From Gale Rossides letter of 2/24/10 to Rep. Bennie Thompson:

“Any changes to privacy settings on individual machines can only be made by the "Z" users. The only people with "Z" user access for use in the lab setting are select personnel in TSA's Office of Security Technology and technicians from the manufacturer.”)

Therefore, TSA does have the capability of changing the “privacy” settings on the machines.

When in Test Mode, the WBI:

• shall (25) allow exporting of image data in real-time; • shall (26) prohibit projection of an image to the TO station; • shall (27) provide a secure means for high-speed transfer of image data; • shall (28) allow exporting of image data (raw and reconstructed).

3.1.1.4.2.1 The IOCP:

….

(d) shall (72) provide image enhancement tools to have, at a minimum, the following image processing capabilities, each selectable by a single keystroke to support image review: (i) Reverse image contrast from full negative to full positive (ii) Zoom from 1X to 4X

3.1.1.5.1 Data Storage and transfer The WEI system shall (98) provide capabilities for data transfers via USB devices.

2.6. Image Screening Position (ISP)

The WBI SHALL (17) provide a means to achieve the following at the ISP position. ……

b) Communicate to the SIP display that the ISP operator wants to take additional scans of the passenger beyond the required minimal number of scans."

Anonymous said...

@Bold TSApologist

epic.org/privacy/body_scanners/EPIC_WBI_Memo_Final_Edit.pdf

WBI (Whole Body Imaging) specs by TSA apply to the backscatter xray scanners (now possibly at a prison near you) and the millimeter wave scanners currently at US airports.

The scanner programs can and do store, display, and export full resolution scanner images of innocent travelers. Who has access to these images, how long they are stored, etc. are never revealed to the American public.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
Do you just make this up as you go to fit your agenda? The "images" cannot be viewed as they do not exist.

Of course they exist. What is the 'gingerbread man' image BASED ON? The raw image the machine produces.

The AIT's have no ability to capture images.

So the TSA claims. They have been caught outright LYING about this before, claiming the scanners "could not" store or export images... while having an example image on their own website. How was this sample image produced, if the machines were physically incapable of storing or exporting images? And then the procurement documents were obtained, showing the TSA SPECIFICALLY REQUESTED the ability to store and export images on those machines....

The machines that could take images were removed from ALL airports years ago.

Again, according to the TSA, which has a track record of LYING.

But you knew that...

Back at ya.

GSOLTSO said...

SSSS sez - " I ask because I can find no evidence of these explosives detection professionals responding to anything anywhere. FOIA requests have turned up zero instances of these professionals being called up to respond to the any of the inert grenades or other devices posted in this blog over the last year."

TSA employs many explosives specialists at some of the airports - many of these people are retired/former military or civilian EOD professionals. These are the first responders in many cases, and if they respond and are able to resolve the situation, there is hardly anything to report. When they have a situation where they need certain types of equipment, or they have an item that they suspect could be an active threat item, that is when the bomb squad would be called in. Responses by bomb squads to items at a checkpoint are comparatively rare, while our TSA explosives experts respond to the checkpoints much more frequently.

Anon sez - "West, who posts the majority of the Tweets on the @tsa Twitter account?"

I am uncertain, if it is an unnamed @TSA twitter account, there is a group at HQ that operates those particular accounts - if it is a named person account, then (as far as I am aware) that is the person responsible for that account.

Concerned sez - "Where do you send actual complaints to be read - not this horrible blog?"

https://apps.tsa.dhs.gov/tsacontact/DynaForm.aspx?FormID=10

Thanks for the feedback!

West
TSA Blog Team

Anonymous said...

GSOLTSO said...
TSA employs many explosives specialists at some of the airports - many of these people are retired/former military or civilian EOD professionals. These are the first responders in many cases, and if they respond and are able to resolve the situation, there is hardly anything to report.

If the "situation" is "resolved", then presumably the item is not actually dangerous, and is returned to its owner, correct?
Or do you just take them, and toss them in the trash can with the bottles of water?

You know, no one has ever explained that basic contradiction- how a bottle of water can be 'too dangerous' to take on the plane, but safe enough to toss in a trash can next to the line of people trying to get past the checkpoint. Care to take a crack at it, West??

Anonymous said...

TSA "nude-o-scopes" as some call them do not have the ability to take, store nor transmit images. The specs posted as you can see are dated 2010. When those specs were produced, back scatter machines were in use as well as AIT machines. The back scatter machines took images via x-ray. The AIT machines only used millimeter waves as thy do now with the cookie cutter image. When people got in an uproar o the back scatter, TSA told the manufacturer that they needed to change their technology to the same type as the AIT. In short, no images, only cookie cutters.
The manufacturers of the back scatter could not produce software or the technology to do this and thus ALL back scatter machines have been removed from American airports. The current AITs have no ability to "see" anything. The use the same technology as your cell phone. However, the AIT send the millimeter waves about 2 feet while your cell phone sends it a few miles. In other words, your cell phone is far more dangerous than the AIT. And like your cell phone, the waves cannot take pictures....
But as I said, you knew that already.

Wintermute said...

As you well know, Bold, those were the specs in the Request for Proposals for the AIT machines. It stands to reason that in order for a manufacturer to get the contract, they had to meet all of the requested specs. It then follows that the actual end product does, indeed, follow the specs of the RFP. But that's using logic. Somethinh one would expect someone with two Master's degrees to be have a better grasp of, but your past arguments prove otherwise.

Anonymous said...

Bold Posting Anonymous said "...The current AITs have no ability to "see" anything.... And like your cell phone, the waves cannot take pictures.... "

Then the machines are rather useless, then, aren't they?

The machine has to be able to take a picture in order to do the scan. I don't mean picture like 'say cheeze.' I mean picture like it has to have something to scan for prohibited items or the machine is a complete waste of time and money. So that debunks your 'no ability to take pictures.'

The machine has to hold whatever data triggered the alarm at least long enough to actually trigger the alarm so that debunks your claim of no file storage.

And since the core of the machine is a computer and we have already proven that it can take and store images then transmission is quite simple. It may not actively do so, but it can.

You are trying to help, you are trying to be a good little cheerleader for the TSA. But you say the dumbest things in the process.

Anonymous said...

Boldy, you have stated multiple times that you are not a TSA employee and have so far refused to tell us who (friend, spouse, relative?) you know that works for the TSA. Your conments about what the nudeoscopes can and can't do have no weight and are full of factual and scientific errors.

Anonymous said...

RB said...
Anonymous said...
I don't care if the naked image isn't displayed in public. The scan is made and stored for an unknown amount of time. The image can be viewed by TSA employees with access to the scanner computer (and a password?). The revealing images can be downloaded or transferred over a network by TSA employees and/or contractors, otherwise, there could be no testing or review of work & systems, and no evidence in case of a criminal incident.

Do you just make this up as you go to fit your agenda? The "images" cannot be viewed as they do not exist. The AIT's have no ability to capture images. They bounce high frequency waves. The machines that could take images were removed from ALL airports years ago. But you knew that...December 25, 2015 at 9:00 AM

TSA's Bold Blotter Intern is either confused or misrepresenting the capabilities of TSA's Strp Search Machines. These are the same MMW Strip Search Machines that are required by contract to have the capability to store and transmit images over common computer networks. The only change was the addition of the privacy filters and the gumby viewer at the machine. What we don't know is if TSA is saving the raw image data but given the dishonesty of TSA overall I wouldn't be surprised to learn that TSA retains images of every person screened by Strip Search machine.

I just find it hilarious that with all the millions of people that travel that you think that TSA will take the time to save and look at images you say are possible to bring up with a password and whatever else. What makes you think your that great that they would take the time to see you?? Get over yourselves.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous Anonymous said...
... ALL back scatter machines have been removed from American airports.

Yes, according to the TSA, an agency that has repeatedly been caught LYING.

The current AITs have no ability to "see" anything.

They bounce electromagnetic waves ("longer than infrared waves or x-rays... but shorter than radio waves or microwaves") off the person being scanned. It is perfectly feasible to create visible images from the returned EM waves. All we have is the TSA's word that the returned EM waves are only used to indicate on the 'gingerbread man' outline where anomalies are found. Of course, we had their word that the previous machines "could not" save or transmit images, and that turned out to be a big fat LIE, so....

The use the same technology as your cell phone.

Um, No.

Anonymous said...

Bold Posting Anonymous said "...The current AITs have no ability to "see" anything.... And like your cell phone, the waves cannot take pictures.... "

Then the machines are rather useless, then, aren't they? absolutely not. They are very effective in detecting anomalies.

The machine has to be able to take a picture in order to do the scan. no, it does not. I don't mean picture like 'say cheeze.' I mean picture like it has to have something to scan for prohibited items or the machine is a complete waste of time and money. So that debunks your 'no ability to take pictures.'

The machine has to hold whatever data triggered the alarm at least long enough to actually trigger the alarm so that debunks your claim of no file storage. only in the sense that it sends the "image" to a monitor. Much like when you are viewing the screen on your home computer. Your home computer does not store every screen image.

And since the core of the machine is a computer and we have already proven that it can take and store images then transmission is quite simple. It may not actively do so, but it can. Absolutely does not.

You are trying to help, you are trying to be a good little cheerleader for the TSA. But you say the dumbest things in the process. that you don't have the ability to understand does not make the statement dumb, perhaps the target is a little slow.

January 2, 2016 at 1:53 PM

Anonymous said...

Look, I'm not going to waste time arguing facts with people who are still using a 2010 spec sheet. Im not going to argue technology with people who have a clear agenda to ignore facts. The very fact that many call them "nude-o-scopes" tells me you have an agenda and cannot conceive the thought that you could be wrong.
When AIT's were first produced as with back scatter machines, they had the ability to store and transmit images. That technology was required by contract to be disabled prior to the machines being installed at airports. When ATR was introduced, back scatter machines were required to use that technology but could not conform. Thus back scatters were removed from ALL American airports. Under contract requirements, AITS are now required to be manufactured with NO ABILITY to save, store or transmit images. It is not just "turned off" as in the past. It is not even within the ability of the machine.
You all can continue to spout your lies and misinformation to fit your agenda all you want. It just simply isn't true and if you were being honest with yourself and the readers here, you would...well, nevermind that.

RB said...

Anonymous said...
Look, I'm not going to waste time arguing facts with people who are still using a 2010 spec sheet. Im not going to argue technology with people who have a clear agenda to ignore facts. The very fact that many call them "nude-o-scopes" tells me you have an agenda and cannot conceive the thought that you could be wrong.
When AIT's were first produced as with back scatter machines, they had the ability to store and transmit images. That technology was required by contract to be disabled prior to the machines being installed at airports. When ATR was introduced, back scatter machines were required to use that technology but could not conform. Thus back scatters were removed from ALL American airports. Under contract requirements, AITS are now required to be manufactured with NO ABILITY to save, store or transmit images. It is not just "turned off" as in the past. It is not even within the ability of the machine.
You all can continue to spout your lies and misinformation to fit your agenda all you want. It just simply isn't true and if you were being honest with yourself and the readers here, you would...well, nevermind that.

January 5, 2016 at 9:06 AM

................................
Evidence that the current MMW WBI have no ability to capture or store images? Come on, provide just one piece of verifiable documentation.

Anonymous said...

Bold Post Anonymous said.... "Look, I'm not going to waste time arguing facts with people"

As he continues to argue with the very people whom he says he isn't going to argue with.

You say you have "facts" but you never cite your sources, you never reference your credentials, and when we say you work to the TSA you spend twice as much time and effort telling us you don't.

I'm going to say this very plainly and very simply..... you are wrong. We don't care about your opinions one whit past the entertainment value you provide by making statements like you aren't going to argue with the rubes while you do exactly that.

The Nudie-Scanners take pictures, can store them, and can even transmit them if needed. If the machines can't do any of those three things then they aren't doing their job....

wait....

There hasn't been a Scanner find posted in this blog for quite some time....

Maybe Boldy is right?

Maybe the scanners don't take pictures?

Maybe they can't store or transmit the images?

Maybe that is why there hasn't been a scanner find in a good long time. Maybe the machines just generate random yellow patches on the gumby image so we thinks they work. Which kind of makes sense since I have a friend who very regularly gets the alarm around his knees even when he is wearing shorts.

I am so sorry Boldy. You have been right all this time. We didn't know. You knew the Nudi-Scanners were a fraud all this time and we didn't listen.

Anonymous said...

Boldy, wrong again. And again. And again.

All the MMW scanners did was add a plugin, a mask if you will, so that the PUBLICLY DISPLAYED image wouldn't show what the scan really looks like.

The rest of the original technology is still there, as spec'd in 2010.

It does not matter for the PRIVACY of the flying public what scanning waves are used. The only reason the backscatter scanners were pulled was because the backscatter company couldn't add a plugin to hide the actual image from the public. Our bodies are still scanned in the same naked way they were before.

If you have ANY proof for your claim that MMW scanners do not meet TSA required specifications to be able to store and transmit images for testing or otherwise, please link to those govt documents. You say you are not a TSA employee, so whatever you claim to know must be public knowledge. What RFP, contract, or purchasing document are you basing your claims on?

Wintermute said...

Look, I'm not going to waste time arguing...

Because you know you are wrong...

Wintermute said...

Where are the updated RFPs? What happened to the AIT machines that could store images (which, btw, the TSA also claimed could not)? The same AITs that were in use when backscatter was removed are still in use today, simply with a software update adding the gumby image. If you refute this fact, where is your supporting documentation? You claim not to work for the TSA, so you are either lying about that fact, or taking the word of an agency who has been caught lying to Congress and the public on multiple occassions. Are you in the habit of trusting known liars?

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
Under contract requirements, AITS are now required to be manufactured with NO ABILITY to save, store or transmit images.

This is EXACTLY what we were told about the previous machines- that they "could not" save or transmit images. Then someone found that requirements document, and proved the TSA was lying.

Now you are saying the EXACT same things- that the current machines have "NO ABILITY" to save/transmit. Any bets on how long it'll be before this is found to be a lie, too??

It is not just "turned off" as in the past. It is not even within the ability of the machine.

It was not, as you say, "turned off" on the old machines- the features were there and active, and just needed an administrator logon to be used.

Fix The TSA said...

One of the photos is from months ago. Top left road flare photo is clearly dated July 25. Is it even from 2015?

Artex Group said...

That is just insane. Are people that ignorant? My cousin works for TSA and he actually confiscated a hand grenade too.