Tuesday, November 24, 2015

TSA 2015 Holiday Travel Tips



Other than turkey and all the fixin’s, Thanksgiving also means that it’s time for the busiest travel season of the year. According to Airlines for America (A4A), airports and airlines anticipate 25.3 million air travelers nationwide during the upcoming 12-day Thanksgiving travel period, a three percent increase over 2014. TSA security checkpoints will be fully staffed nationwide during this time.

With many infrequent or first-time travelers, we always like to offer a cornucopia of travel tips and links to the most common things travelers need to know prior to traveling.

Arrive Prepared: Arrive early to the airport to allow enough time to park, get your boarding pass, check your baggage and go through the checkpoint. We recommend arriving at the airport at least two hours before your flight if you are not yet enrolled in TSA Pre®.

Prohibited Items: Use the “Can I Bring My…” tool to enter the item you want to pack. It will tell you whether you can pack it in your carry-on or checked bag. You may also refer to our prohibited items list. If you still can’t find the answer, reach out to our @AskTSA team via Twitter and they’ll get back to you right away with an answer. 
TSA Pre®: Learn more about TSA Pre✓®, which allows eligible travelers to receive expedited screening. Use your Department of Defense identification number when making flight reservations. Remember, entering incorrect information can lead to not being selected for TSA Pre✓®. Accompanying family members ages 12 and under can be processed through expedited screening as well.
TSA Cares Helpline: Call TSA Cares toll free at 1-855-787-2227 if you or a family member with a disability or medical condition has questions about screening policies, procedures and what to expect at the security checkpoint 72 hours prior to traveling. 

Wrapped Gifts are Allowed, But Not Encouraged: We’re not the Heat Miser; however, we might have to unwrap gifts. If there’s something in the gift that needs to be inspected, we may have to open it. Our officers try their best not to mangle the gift wrap, but it’s not a guarantee and it also slows down the line for everybody else when we have to do this.
Liquids, Gels & Aerosols: If you’re checking a bag, make your life simple by packing liquids in your checked baggage. That way, you don’t have to worry about the liquids rules. You’re allowed to take as many 3.4 ounce or smaller sized containers that will fit in one sealed, clear, quart-sized zip-top bag – and one bag per person. Make sure you take the zip-top bag out of your carry-on prior to sending it through the X-ray.

Deodorant: Stick deodorant is not limited to 3.4 oz or less, but gel or spray deodorant is.
Makeup: Any liquid makeup cosmetics such as eyeliner, nail polish, liquid foundation, etc., should be placed in the baggie. That goes for perfume as well. Powder makeup is fine.
Beverages: Wine, liquor, beer and all of your favorite beverages are permitted in your checked baggage. You can also bring beverages packaged in 3.4 oz or less bottles in your carry-on bags in the 3-1-1 bag.

Foods: Cakes, pies, bread, donuts, turkeys, etc., are all permitted. Read the list of foods that should be placed in your checked bags or shipped if they don’t comply with the carry-on rules. 
Military Travel: TSA offers screening benefits for members of the U.S. Armed forces. Active duty service members and Cadets and midshipmen of the U.S. Military Academy, Naval Academy, Coast Guard Academy and Air Force Academy are also eligible to receive TSA Pre® screening benefits. Supply your DoD ID number as your Known Traveler Number on each reservation. Learn about TSA Pre®.

Dry Ice: Find out how to travel with dry ice to keep your favorite Thanksgiving vittles preserved while traveling.

Shaving Razors: Certain razors are permitted. Learn which ones you can fly with in this blog post

Forgotten or Lost IDs: If you have lost or forgotten your ID, you will still be permitted to fly as long as you help us verify you are who you say you are by answering a few questions.  

Batteries: You can’t go anywhere without some kind of battery these days. Learn about what types of batteries you can travel with.
 
Blades: Anything with blades, points or spikes should be placed in your checked baggage. This includes knives of all sizes, and blender and food processor blades. Nail clippers and corkscrews are permitted, but models with blades attached are prohibited.
Medication: One of the more popular questions we get from travelers is: “Can I travel with my medication?” The answer is yes, with some qualifiers.

Traveling With Children: Did you know that children 12 and under can keep their shoes on? Read about the screening process and how to best pack for your child

Traveling With a Pet: Contact your airline first to ask about requirements, fees or restrictions they might have. Read about going through security screening with your pet.
Jewelry: Read about the best practices when going through security with your jewelry. There are a few different choices that you can make based on what kind of jewelry it is.

Baggage Locks: Want to lock your checked baggage? Be sure to read about TSA recognized locks

Double Check: If you’re grabbing a bag, suitcase, briefcase, jacket or other item you haven’t used in a while, be sure to give it the onceover so you don’t accidentally take something prohibited at the checkpoint. Many people who have brought guns, ammunition, knives and other prohibited item say that they did so unknowingly.
Lose Something? Contact the airport lost and found. It’s a good idea to tape your business card or contact info to your valuable electronics or other items. Not only does this help us contact you if you lose your items, it prevents travelers from grabbing the wrong item by mistake.

If You See Something, Say Something: Public awareness is key for supporting TSA’s security efforts; therefore, TSA encourages travelers to remember If You See Something, Say Something™.” For those traveling abroad, check the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Know Before You Go page to learn about required documentation. 
 
@AskTSA: Still have questions? Well, if you’re on Twitter, there is a brand new way to contact us. Reach out to our @AskTSA team. We have a team standing by from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. ET on weekdays and 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. on weekends and holidays. If you prefer to call or submit an online form, you can reach out to our contact center weekdays from 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. ET and weekends/holidays from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. ET.

 
Follow @TSA on Twitter and Instagram! 

Bob Burns
TSA Social Media Team
 

20 comments:

  1. Are these travel tips updated? Ever? It's the same stuff every single holiday. It's tired.

    ReplyDelete
  2. The big question is "how will TSA screw up this travel season"?

    Will it be from the non-answer that the TSA "CAN I BRING" tool gives for nitro pills, a life saving medicine, or will TSA convince itself that "Proper Procedures Where Followed" when the next TSA confiscates a childs harmless toy, or will it be some "Highly Trained TSA Screener" who dumps an ostomy bag all over a traveler?

    Air travel this time of year is tough enough and TSA only makes it harder!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Bob Burns,
    The Heat Miser! So glad to see your natural wit shine through! Tell those dull folks you work for that a little humor will actually help encourage people to read your blog, which, presumably, is the goal. I stopped reading when they clipped your witty wings. So glad I made an exception today!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Will any American citizen comments be approved between November 22 and December 4?

    ReplyDelete
  5. This thread should have come out 10 days ago, Bob, to be of use. Instead, you put it out in the late afternoon on the day before the biggest travel day of the year.

    What do you do all day, Bob? Chase terrorists?

    Wasn't there another thread on holiday travel recently that came out in the middle of the holiday weekend?

    screen shot/DHS OIG statement

    ReplyDelete
  6. My husband and I left Las Vegas 11/20/15 to go back home. Did not take shoes off or go through metal detector. The first guy checked our drivers license and initialed our electronic ticket and said that is all we needed to show. We did pull out to show liquid that we carried. Disappointed and surprised.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Tip for bringing cranberry sauce, peanut butter, cheese dip, jam, mustard, and other delicious and innocuous (except in the eyes of TSA) food items: just put it in a pie!

    ReplyDelete
  8. I used to fly in UH1 helicopters frequently. Every flight was prefaced with a briefing about egress, rotor location in the event of a crash and procedures for pilot rescue. I heard that briefing about 50 times. There is nothing out of line about being re-briefed. Is there any reason any of the commenters on this page have to resort to being rude and condescending about the smallest of topics? Have any of you ever been shot at? Have you ever seen an air crash close up? I doubt it. The animosity the public exhibits toward TSA, creates a very unfriendly environment, that seemingly only gets worse. If you don't like TSA, unsubscribe to their newsletters, go hang out with the Kardashians and charter your own jet.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I was in my seat while the boarding was finishing in IAH. The gate attendant came on board with a carry on looking for the owner. What happened to See Something, Say Something. She didn't know the owner and did not know the contents. Who can I call in a situation like this?

    ReplyDelete
  10. http://news.yahoo.com/utah-man-passes-airport-security-stolen-boarding-pass-170652400.html

    "Utah man passes airport security with stolen boarding pass"

    " A sex offender with a stolen boarding pass got through airport security in Salt Lake City and checked in at a gate for a flight to California before he was caught earlier this month, authorities have disclosed."

    TSA on the job. The agency that has to get it right every time.....well, except when they screw up which is regular and often!

    ReplyDelete
  11. This thread should have come out 10 days ago, Bob, to be of use. Instead, you put it out in the late afternoon on the day before the biggest travel day of the year.

    What do you do all day, Bob? Chase terrorists?

    Wasn't there another thread on holiday travel recently that came out in the middle of the holiday weekend?

    please refrain from ever criticizing my grammar or spelling in the future. Thanks

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Boldy, obviously you still need to be corrected on spelling and grammar because the sentence you highlighted above is grammatically correct.

      Oh, and you didn't capitalize the first word in your sentence. Lol!

      Delete
  12. Can a minor (14yr) fly alone with a properly packaged disassembled replica firearm(airsoft m4). Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  13. a little late, since the post didn't go up until after most of us were already off, but here are some additional suggestions for TSA to make our travel and security experience as convenient as possible:

    1) eliminate TSA and return to pre-911 screening. the TSA makes things no more secure, and arguably less secure, since we now know that TSA misses 95% of prohibited items, as opposed to 60% or lower in testing of the old systems. in addition, the 911 attacks focused on 2 gaps in security: unsecured cockpit doors, and the training of flight crews and passengers to be compliant. both of those are now corrected - no one is going to take over an airliner with a penknife anymore.

    2) full and total transparency of all DHS and TSA regulations, rules, procedures, and watch/no-fly lists, as well as public comment periods for new rules, and an independent appeal process for those placed on no fly or terrorist watch lists (as ordered by the federal courts).

    3) eliminate the Pre-Bribe, er, Pre-Check program. it is a waste of taxpayer dollars as well as flat out insulting to be required to pay to have a background check done in order to be screened in a semi-sane way. if I hold a security clearance and a concealed weapons permit, the federal and state governments have already paid for, or charged me for, a background check. why does TSA require this wasteful duplication???

    4) eliminate ID requirements. it is unConstitutional (freedom to travel domestically is not guaranteed only if the govt can ID you), and it contributes nothing to security. what does it matter if you know my name, if I am carrying a bomb? why is my name any damn business of yours if I am not carrying a bomb or
    intending some kind of threat? I should only have to show ID if I am subject to LE investigation.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Anonymous, what in particular offends you about my grammar?

    Please be specific.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Gary Nelson Harper said...
    I used to fly in UH1 helicopters frequently. Every flight was prefaced with a briefing about egress, rotor location in the event of a crash and procedures for pilot rescue. I heard that briefing about 50 times. There is nothing out of line about being re-briefed. Is there any reason any of the commenters on this page have to resort to being rude and condescending about the smallest of topics? Have any of you ever been shot at? Have you ever seen an air crash close up? I doubt it. The animosity the public exhibits toward TSA, creates a very unfriendly environment, that seemingly only gets worse. If you don't like TSA, unsubscribe to their newsletters, go hang out with the Kardashians and charter your own jet.

    November 25, 2015 at 7:55 PM

    .........................

    I have picked up the pieces of a fighter jets after a crash. It's is amazing how small they become after impact with the ground. Doesn't do the crew much good either if they didn't punch out. I have also been under missile lock from an opposing force and don't know to this day why they didn't take the shot. No matter, being in the very far North Atlantic, had we gone down we would have frozen to death in minutes with the water temperatures in that area.

    The animosity you speak of is of TSA's on making. This blog for example. How many questions go unanswered and ignored because those questions might expose the hypocrisy of TSA and its employees? The TSA bloggers here have been shown without question to misrepresent things and in some cases have flat out lied. Then you deal with the TSA screeners in airports and it only gets worse. People have been held hostage, strip searched, and worse by TSA employees and nothing is ever done in a meaningful way to improve the travelers experience when dealing with TSA employees.

    TSA is the worst thing to happen to this country after 9/11 so I think I will stay the course and continue to voice my opposition to TSA as all good patriots should be doing.

    You go charter the jet and hang out with the Kardashians.

    ReplyDelete

  16. 1) eliminate TSA and return to pre-911 screening. the TSA makes things no more secure, and arguably less secure, since we now know that TSA misses 95% of prohibited items, as opposed to 60% or lower in testing of the old systems. in addition, the 911 attacks focused on 2 gaps in security: unsecured cockpit doors, and the training of flight crews and passengers to be compliant. both of those are now corrected - no one is going to take over an airliner with a penknife anymore.
    unless of course TSA stops restricting them.

    2) full and total transparency of all DHS and TSA regulations, rules, procedures, and watch/no-fly lists, as well as public comment periods for new rules, and an independent appeal process for those placed on no fly or terrorist watch lists (as ordered by the federal courts). awesome idea, publish the TSA SOP so terrorist and other bad people know exactly what is going on.

    3) eliminate the Pre-Bribe, er, Pre-Check program. it is a waste of taxpayer dollars as well as flat out insulting to be required to pay to have a background check done in order to be screened in a semi-sane way. if I hold a security clearance and a concealed weapons permit, the federal and state governments have already paid for, or charged me for, a background check. why does TSA require this wasteful duplication??? don't like it? Don't pay for it. Most travelers LOVE pre-check

    4) eliminate ID requirements. it is unConstitutional (freedom to travel domestically is not guaranteed only if the govt can ID you), and it contributes nothing to security. what does it matter if you know my name, if I am carrying a bomb? why is my name any damn business of yours if I am not carrying a bomb or
    intending some kind of threat? I should only have to show ID if I am subject to LE investigation. sure, let anyone on a plane. Doesn't matter if they have a stolen or forged boarding pass. They mean no harm.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The current procedures do nothing to prevent use of stolen/forged boarding passes. Just happened the other day. The US government has no right to restrict the travel of it's law-abiding citizens. Last I checked, the Constitution did not include an ID requirement as part of that right.

      Delete
  17. Anon sez - "Can a minor (14yr) fly alone with a properly packaged disassembled replica firearm(airsoft m4). Thank you. "

    Yes, as long as it is properly packaged and in checked baggage.

    Ciaran sez - "Are these travel tips updated? Ever? It's the same stuff every single holiday. It's tired."

    Some of the information is the same, but each post is different.

    West
    TSA Blog Team

    ReplyDelete
  18. The question was about the TSA requiring I'd to go through security and the comment was ".. I should only have to show ID if I am subject to LE investigation. "

    Which is true. The clerk only compares your boarding pass to the ID you provide. They don't have anyway of knowing if either of those documents are valid or not.

    Our bold posting intern had this to say..."
    sure, let anyone on a plane. Doesn't matter if they have a stolen or forged boarding pass. They mean no harm.
    "

    So how are the clerks going to know the boarding pass is stolen?

    And what does it matter to security if it is? Did they get screened for explosives and weapons? So even if the boarding pass I'd stolen they can't bring down a plane.

    The question was asked many times and never answered... How does ID matter to aviation security?

    ReplyDelete

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