Saturday, October 24, 2015

TSA Week in Review: 64 Firearms Discovered This Week Along With Gun Powder, Concealed Items, and More

Discovered firearms

64 firearms were discovered this week in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 64 firearms discovered, 54 were loaded and 19 had a round chambered. All of the firearms pictured here were discovered this week. See a complete list below.

Discovered bear repellent

A reminder about bear repellant: It’s best to buy it at your destination. Bear repellent is prohibited in the cabin of an aircraft. You can pack bear repellent in your checked bag if the volume is less than four ounces and if it has less than a two percent active ingredient of either CS or CN. Most bear repellents exceed these limitations. Three cans were discovered in carry-on bags this week at Anchorage (ANC), Bozeman (BZN) and Glacier Park (FCA).

Discovered inert grenade

If an item looks like a real bomb, grenade, mine, etc., it is prohibited. When these items are found at a checkpoint or in checked baggage, they can cause significant delays because the explosives detection professionals must respond to resolve the alarm. Even if they are novelty items, you are prohibited from bringing them onboard the aircraft. Two replica grenades were discovered this week in carry-on bags at Orlando (MCO) and New Orleans (MSY). The inert grenade pictured above was discovered in a checked bag at Charlotte (CLT).

Discovered gun powder and ammunition

Two pounds of gun powder and 600 rounds of ammunition were discovered this week in a checked bag at the Richmond International Airport (RIC). Black powder is never permitted, but ammunition can be packed in checked baggage as long as the proper packing guidelines are followed

Discovered cane sword

A cane sword was discovered in a traveler’s carry-on property at Memphis (MEM).



A pocketknife was discovered bolted under the liner of a carry-on bag at New Orleans (MSY).



A lipstick knife was discovered in a carry-on bag at Shreveport (SHV).

Discovered Marijuana concealed in a jar of peanut butter

Marijuana was discovered concealed in a jar of peanut butter in a checked bag at San Jose (SJC). As we’ve said before, we’re not looking for illegal narcotics, but we have to report them to law enforcement when discovered.


Concealed Marijuana
An aerosol can with a false bottom (concealing marijuana) was discovered in a carry-on bag at Las Vegas (LAS).




Discovered knives
Clockwise from the top, these items were discovered at SLC, SAN, SAN, BZN, PHX, PVD, SAN, OAK and BUR
Discovered knives
From the top, these items were discovered at RSW, SAN and LYH
Discovered ammunition
When packed properly, ammunition can be transported in your checked baggage, but it is never permissible to pack ammo in your carry-on bag. This box of 25 20-gauge shotgun shells was discovered in a carry-on bag at AUS.

In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly in carry-on bags, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons, stun guns, small pocketknives and many other prohibited items too numerous to note.



Table for discovered firearms in carry-on bags listYou can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline.






Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.



Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $11,000. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions; that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.



*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates.



Read our 2014 Year in Review post! If you haven’t read them yet, make sure you check out our year in review posts for 2011, 2012 and 2013.



Follow @TSA on Twitter and Instagram!



Bob Burns
TSA Social Media Team



askTSA Information


27 comments:

Anonymous said...

As always, absolutely nothing you needed your slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners to detect. Meanwhile, how many people suffered physical searches thanks to false alarms on these useless machines?

Why are Curtis Burns and West Cooper unwilling to address, let alone answer, that question?

How many weeks has it been since you last trumpeted something dangerous you found with the naked body scanners?

SSSS for some reason said...

64 guns? Any terrorists attached to them?

Anonymous said...

The "Privacy & Website Policies" and "Get Plug-ins" links on the right-hand sidebar are STILL broken.

My goodness, what's the point of running a joke of a "blog" with no credibility if you can't even keep it up to DATE, Bobby and West? Why even BOTHER? It's not like you're fooling anybody smart enough to know how to close a bold tag...

Anonymous said...

The "Privacy & Website Policies" and "Get Plug-ins" links on the right-hand sidebar are STILL broken.

My goodness, what's the point of running a joke of a "blog" with no credibility if you can't even keep it up to DATE, Bobby and West? Why even BOTHER? It's not like you're fooling anybody smart enough to know how to close a bold tag...

Anonymous said...

"Two pounds of gun powder and 600 rounds of ammunition were discovered this week in a checked bag at the Richmond International Airport (RIC). Black powder is never permitted, but ammunition can be packed in checked baggage as long as the proper packing guidelines are followed."

Was the gun powder seized? Was the ammunition seized? Was the passenger allowed to fly?

Anonymous said...

Still 404 on those links.

Seems that the TSA social media team is incapable of actually, you know, USING social media.

Somebody at the TSA is failing at their job? Call the press, folks! That's something that only happens 95% of the time!

Anonymous said...

posting friendly reminder:

West said:

Anon provided some direct links that I have forwarded up to Blogger Bob for review. I will post any follow-up information I receive on the posted items as I get it.

Chris Boyce said...

Wow -- TWO drug busts this week. You must be proud.

RB said...

The can of bear spray is tagged 10/16/15. Last week, not this week.

Also noted that the pictures of guns are said to be found this week. Is that an admission that the TSA Blob Team was in fact reusing pictures?

And what accounts for the higher number of guns being found in recent weeks? Have screeners put down there cell phones and are now paying attention part of the time?

Anonymous said...

West, Bobby:

The links on the right-hand side of the page for "Privacy & Website Policies" and "Get Plug-ins" are both broken.

Further, your link to the TSA Blog Team Twitter account goes to an account that does not appear affiliated with the TSA or DHS in any way. Unless you want to claim that the TSA bloggers have suddenly gotten into the business of link spamming and SEO/email-marketing hustles? I'll note that the @TSABlogTeam account has been posting this material since early July, so you're at LEAST 3 months behind the ball on noticing that your account was hacked or allowed to lapse...

Your link to "The Blog @ Homeland Security" is broken, as well. Archive.org indicates that "The Blog @ Homeland Security" went offline sometime between 4 September 2013 and 20 September 2013, so you've been providing dead links to your OWN EMPLOYER'S BLOG for at least two years. Way to stay ahead of the curve on THAT one!

Your comments section rejects comments well under 4096 characters with a rejection message indicating that messages must be under 4096 characters. Apparently, you shortened comment lengths without updating that error message.

Your link to the "Comment Policy" (right above the comment box) leads to a page with no mention of the actual comment policy. You apparently aren't even PRETENDING to have any sort of real standards, are you?

Really, boys: if you're going to run such a joke of a blog, can't you even be bothered to run it well? This place is amateur hour. Then again, that's pretty much how the TSA operates in general, so I don't suppose I should be surprised...

Anonymous said...

Has West finally surrendered his position as Allower Of Comments or is he on vacation yet again?

RB said...

3 items in last weeks listings shows by date stamp things found the prior week.

So is it TSA Week in Review or TSA, heap anything we can to make it look like TSA really does something useful weekly posting?

Anonymous said...

I see you were ashamed enough to clean up the myriad broken links and problems I submitted via comments the other day.

Yet you lack the courage to post my comment calling out the TSA's "social media team" for being so incompetent that they left up a broken link for TWO YEARS.

Such integrity, courage, and technical know-how! Truly, the TSA social media team are the brave protectors of our nation!

Susan Richart said...

http://tsanewsblog.com/16302/news/another-elderly-woman-abused-by-the-tsa/

"Harriette Charney, age 90, was “asked” to go into a private room with the blue shirts, where they then “asked” her to take off her blouse and her bra. She complied."

An administrative search, which is the only type of search the TSA is allowed to do on passengers, is governed by its "publicness":

"Moreover, the possibility for abuse is minimized by the public nature of the search. Unlike searches conducted on dark and lonely streets at night where often the officer and the subject are the only witnesses, these searches are made under supervision and not far from the scrutiny of the traveling public."

See United States v. Skipwith, 482 F.2d 1272, 1275
(5th Cir. 1973)."

A private room behind a closed and most likely locked door is far from the scrutiny of the traveling public.

NEVER EVER agree to go to a private room with the TSA.

Anonymous said...

You got the TSA blotter team to do more than it has in years. Good for you Anonymous commenter!

RB said...

How long does it take TSA to comply with the law in regards to the Administrative Procedures Act? How many years has it been since a federal court ordered TSA to comply with the law in the case of the Electronic Strip Search Machines and what will TSA do since the vast majority of public comments were not supportive of TSA's use of the Electronic Strip Search machines. Will TSA ignore the comments of citizens?

Anonymous said...

I found this disturbing story:

http://www.katu.com/news/investigators/Son-says-90-year-old-mom-told-to-remove-blouse-during-TSA-search-337312191.html

Why was this 90 year old lady forced to remove her shirt and bra? It's even worse that the TSA spokesperson said the system worked as it should.

Some of the pat downs are far too invasive and degrading. Now it seems passengers have to worry about being strip searched too. Sadly, too many people still have an anything for safety mentality.

Anonymous said...

West, over the past month, many comments from the American public about comments delayed and deleted even though their comments met blog policy. You haven't responded to these comments.

What say you, West? Why are you delaying and deleting comments that meet blog policy?

Anonymous said...

SSSS for some reason said...
64 guns? Any terrorists attached to them?
how would they know? Perhaps the owner of the gun would say " ya got me, I'm a terrorist." Maybe he would have a business card listing "terrorist" as his occupation. Really, how would they know? They don't interview people who bring guns to a checkpoint...you know that yet continue to ask the same questions.

Anonymous said...

You all outdid yourselves this week on the abrasiveness of your comments. I hope that it has boosted your egos to an all-time new plateau. Thanks again TSA guys for having to put up with the bad behavior by a few individuals. If additional duties in TSA are like it is in any other government organization, I'm sure that the TSA didn't send you to "Blog School" so you would be able to manage it to the level expected by the naysayers. Some of you contributors need to get a job and move out of your parent's basement. Use some of that training you learned at Blog School to better the country.

Anonymous said...

Is there any real reason for this blog to have a comments section? Can't this bunch of ranters find some other place to spew their hateful messages? And this new string about broken links on the webpage... Good gosh, do you have to leave such critical, insulting messages about it? Is TSA the ONLY webpage on the internet that has a few broken links? It's really a waste of time for a sane person to even look at the comments to this blog.

Anonymous said...

30 October:

No new comments have been posted in 4 days.

Bobby and West still can't be bothered to fix their broken links (or possibly just lack the technical acumen required to understand basic HTML).

The weekly propaganda post is late. Maybe Bobby and West can't tell if they're actually posting guns found THIS week-- or just doing their usual job of posting stuff from WEEKS ago that they think looks scary enough to justify their salaries?

"Sad and pathetic" doesn't begin to cover the situation, really.

Here's hoping that Admiral Neffenger does the humane thing and pulls the plug on the failed "TSA Social Media" experiment...

SSSS for some reason said...

Anonymous said...
SSSS for some reason said...
64 guns? Any terrorists attached to them?
how would they know? Perhaps the owner of the gun would say " ya got me, I'm a terrorist." Maybe he would have a business card listing "terrorist" as his occupation. Really, how would they know? They don't interview people who bring guns to a checkpoint..

Then it would seem that the TSA is doing an even worse job than we thought. A firearm is a prohibited item (for reasons that make no sense) so why would you NOT interview someone who is bringing a firearm through the checkpoint?

Anonymous said...

"...It's really a waste of time for a sane person to even look at the comments to this blog."

Says the person reading and responding to the comments on this blog.

Anonymous said...

Then it would seem that the TSA is doing an even worse job than we thought. A firearm is a prohibited item (for reasons that make no sense) so why would you NOT interview someone who is bringing a firearm through the checkpoint?

really? Guns have been illegal on planes since 1972. Perhaps a history lesson on aviation security would help you understand why. BTW, that is 40 years before TSA but go ahead and blame TSA anyway, its what you do. Why does TSA not interview people with guns? TSA is not a law enforcement agency. As you know and have known for a very long time, TSA is there to detect threat items and keep them off of planes. Any illegal activity detected (such as finding a gun) is turned over to local law enforcement. Just a hunch, I would guess this is about the 20th time this has been answered for you.

Anonymous said...

"...TSA is not a law enforcement agency."

Thank you for confirming what the TSA won't actually say.

And you also just confirmed that the clerks who work for the TSA are *not* Officers.

Anonymous said...

Bold TSApologist, your answers about TSA policies and procedures don't count because you claim to not be a TSA employee and have yet to identify who you know who is a TSA employee and feeds you all of the misinformation you post with such an "authoritative" air.

Hard to "respect your authoritah" when you have none.