Friday, October 2, 2015

TSA Week in Review: 53 Firearms Discovered This Week in Carry-on Bags

Discovered firearms

53 firearms were discovered this week in carry-on bags around the nation. Of the 53 firearms discovered, 48 were loaded and 17 had a round chambered. All of the firearms pictured here were discovered this week. See a complete list below.

Discovered inert grenade

Inert Ordnance and Grenades etc. – We continue to find inert grenades and other weaponry on a weekly basis. Keep in mind that if an item looks like a real bomb, grenade, mine, etc., it is prohibited. When these items are found at a checkpoint or in checked baggage, they can cause significant delays because the explosives detection professionals must respond to resolve the alarm. Even if they are novelty items, you are prohibited from bringing them onboard the aircraft.The inert grenade pictured was discovered in a checked bag at Jacksonville (JAX).

Discovered cane knife

A knife hidden inside of cane was discovered at Milwaukee (MKE).

Discovered muli-tool

A multi-tool was discovered inside of a hollowed out shaving cream can at Omaha (OMA).

Discovered knives
Clockwise from the top, these items were discovered at BUR, SFO, PHX, GRK, CHS, CLE, PHX and FSD


Stun Guns - 14 stun guns were discovered this week in carry-on bags around the nation. Two were discovered at Dallas Love (DAL), and the remainder were discovered at Baltimore (BWI), Boise (BOI), Burbank (BUR), Denver (DEN), Fairbanks (FAI), Glacier Park (FCA), Las Vegas (LAS), Oakland (OAK), Phoenix (PHX), Reno (RNO), San Diego (SAN), and Tulsa (TUL).  



Table for discovered firearms in carry-on bags list

You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms. Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $11,000. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions; that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates.



Read our 2014 Year in Review post! If you haven’t read them yet, make sure you check out our year in review posts for 2011, 2012 and 2013.

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Bob Burns
TSA Social Media Team


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24 comments:

Anonymous said...

As always, absolutely nothing you needed your slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners to detect. Meanwhile, how many people suffered physical searches thanks to false alarms on these useless machines?

Why are Curtis Burns and West Cooper unwilling to address, let alone answer, that question?

How many weeks has it been since you last trumpeted something dangerous you found with the naked body scanners?

Anonymous said...

Still too gutless to talk about the abuse of Shadi Petosky, huh?

Anonymous said...

When was the last time you found a gun on someone's body with your fancy body scanners?

Doober said...

Long weekend, West?

Anonymous said...

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense. now you're even allowing college kids (kaydets) to endure more reasonable screening, but those who served and sacrificed for 20+ are out of luck.

Anonymous said...

A hollowed out can of Barbasol with a multi-tool in it? Seriously?? What purpose would someone have to go to the trouble of cutting the top off of the can and sticking a tool with knives, saw, etc... in it and then bringing it along in their carry-on baggage? I'm not saying that a multi-tool is as dangerous as a gun but at the very least, I hope this person spent a day or two in jail.

RB said...

Why does the TSA "When I fly can I bring my" tool return a non-responsive result when querying if Medical Nitroglycerin Medicine is permitted past a TSA Checkpoint?

This is the response I get even after this issue having been addressed for many months.

And yes, I do see the Green Bar but it is not defined so has no meaning. It's the words that count and they say nothing in response to the question, "Are Nitroglycerin Pills allowed".

Search Results For:
nitroglycerin pills

Check or Carry-on

TSA allows larger amounts of medically necessary liquids, gels, and aerosols in reasonable quantities for your trip, but you must declare them to security officers at the checkpoint for inspection.

We recommend, but do not require, that your medications be labeled to facilitate the security process.

You may carry non-medically necessary liquids, gels and aerosols in your carry-on bags only if they adhere to the 3-1-1 rule: containers must be 3.4 ounces or less; stored in a 1 quart/liter zip-top bag; 1 zip-top bag per person. Larger amounts of non-medicinal liquids, gels, and aerosols must be placed in checked baggage.

Even if an item is generally permitted, it may be subject to additional screening or not allowed through the checkpoint if it triggers an alarm during the screening process, appears to have been tampered with, or poses other security concerns. The final decision rests with TSA on whether to allow any items on the plane.


Why can't TSA manage to clear up any confusion that this information supplies and use some language that actually addresses the question asked?

Is it really that hard for TSA to do the right thing?



Anonymous said...

Great video on TSA. West Cooper, Curtis Burns, are you too gutless to respond?
http://boingboing.net/2015/10/05/security-theater-ha-ha-only.html

Anonymous said...

You seem to be finding a lot more guns lately. I'm not sure how to take that. Are more people forgetting where they left their guns and getting caught at the airport? Are the same amount of guns being carried by passengers, but more of them are being found by the TSA? That would mean the TSA was missing more guns in the past. Either way, it's not good.

Susan Richart said...

Four days and no comments posted. What a freakin' waste.

RB said...

Entering the 5th day since the weekly "TSA Lookie at What We Did" post was put up and not one comment has been posted.

Is it really that hard for TSA to manage a blog when it has three bloggers?

Anonymous said...

5 days and counting without any comments approved.

Anonymous said...

"...When these items are found at a checkpoint or in checked baggage, they can cause significant delays because the explosives detection professionals must respond to resolve the alarm."

I have never seen one of these teams before, tell us more about them please. In my local airport the Agent just scowls at the passengers and then 'voluntarily surrenders' the item from the traveller.

Unknown said...

Is there any discussion about building a profile data base on flyers? One for instance that would record the fact that some of us have replaced knees, hips, etc.? Wouldn't it save time if upon check-in the computer told you my knees are replaced so that I wouldn't have to go through the screening gate but could go immediately to the pat-down area? Couldn't the computers record the fact and tell TSA agents that I have been through screening well over 200 times and never once had a problem?

TSA in my opinion should work in two ways. One, as TSA does well already, is to work to identify high-risk passengers. Great work....keep it up. But the second objective should be to actively identify low-risk passengers and find more ways to speed them through the process.

I know a process exists for frequent flyers to apply for special treatment, but the onus is on the passenger to prove s/he is not a threat---and pay handsomely for it too. Identifying safe passengers and making the check-in process easier for them should be a TSA responsibility. *Repeatedly* having to show that both my knees are replaced and my chest has a staple in it from heart surgery is a waste of everyone's time. TSA itself needs to actively and independently do that task. Especially in this day and age of secure computers and data bases. f

The indignity TSA repeatedly puts ordinary and predictably safe passengers through is silly. As Bob Newhart says [see youtube sketch], "Stop it!"

RB said...

Entering the 6th day after the weekly recap without any readers comments being posted.

I'm starting to think that TSA doesn't really want public comments.

GSOLTSO said...

Doober sez - "Long weekend, West?"

Yup, like a week long weekend with family, which I am going to get back to in just a few minutes!

Anon sez - "A hollowed out can of Barbasol with a multi-tool in it? Seriously?? "

Yes, you would be surprised how often we see items like this.

Anon sez - "Great video on TSA."

I will only say that I disagree with some of the conclusions and points made in the video.

Unknown sez - "Is there any discussion about building a profile data base on flyers?"

One problem with that would be the requirement for personally identifiable information on the individuals - not necessarily a huge undertaking, but it does open up another opportunity for PII to be compromised. The biggest challenge would be the fact that we would still have to verify what is causing the alarm - which would mean the screening process would remain essentially the same as it is now.

West
TSA Blog Team

Susan Richart said...

From another thread:

BBI says a terrorist does not become a terrorist until he/she commits an act of terrorism.

Wrong, BBI. The FBI claims all the time that they have caught terrorists before any act was committed.

He also wrote: "Or they scan her as a man...." TSA rules/regs say transgender passengers are scanned as they present at the checkpoint. Telling her to get back in the machine and be scanned as a male was an infraction.

And finally, no TSA is not wrong 100% of the time and I really don't think anyone has ever claimed that. HOWEVER, the TSA's initial reaction to any complaint is to always blame the passenger or to deny. TSA would be far better off if it would, before denying or blaming, look into a complaint first before saying anything. TSA would also be far better off losing the "we treat all passengers with dignity and respect" line. But maybe they feel if they keep saying it it will one day be true.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

RB said...

GSOLTSO said...
Doober sez - "Long weekend, West?"

Yup, like a week long weekend with family, which I am going to get back to in just a few minutes!
.......................
There are two other TSA bloggers, right?

Can't one of them post comments when needed?

Or is it just getting their name on some collateral duty so they look like they are doing more than the next guy?

Anonymous said...

It sure does look funny how you never answer those questions about false alarms, especially with the way you guys were rubbing people's genitals in Denver for no reason.

RB said...

Anonymous Anonymous said...
Great video on TSA. West Cooper, Curtis Burns, are you too gutless to respond?
http://boingboing.net/2015/10/05/security-theater-ha-ha-only.html

October 6, 2015 at 9:03 AM

..................
There is another great video out there. I tried posting the link and it has been censored. I have tried posting just the name of the video but TSA has also censored that.

It deals with TSA's failed Behavior Detection Program and the video while exactly on point is hilarious.

Why is TSA and its Blog Team so afraid of this video that they censor my Right to Free Speech when just posting the name of the video?

That Oath to Defend the United States Constitution must not mean much to TSA employees.

RB said...

Anonymous Anonymous said...
Great video on TSA. West Cooper, Curtis Burns, are you too gutless to respond?
http://boingboing.net/2015/10/05/security-theater-ha-ha-only.html

October 6, 2015 at 9:03 AM
.....................
There is another great video out about TSA's BDO program. I have tried posting a link and just the name of the video but TSA keeps illegally censoring my posting.

Seems TSA knows that the TSA BDO prgram is a sham and they don't want the truth to be known.

Anonymous said...

From another thread:

BBI says a terrorist does not become a terrorist until he/she commits an act of terrorism. in the context with which my comment was made, I was exactly correct. I was referring to TSA and its screening policies as you know.

Wrong, BBI. The FBI claims all the time that they have caught terrorists before any act was committed.

He assumption? also wrote: "Or they scan her as a man...." TSA rules/regs say transgender passengers are scanned as they present at the checkpoint. Telling her to get back in the machine and be scanned as a male was an infraction. that was exactly my point. Its called sarcasm. Way to take a few words and put them in a different context.

And finally, no TSA is not wrong 100% of the time and I really don't think anyone has ever claimed that. HOWEVER, the TSA's initial reaction to any complaint is to always blame the passenger or to deny. TSA would be far better off if it would, before denying or blaming, look into a complaint first before saying anything. really? You don't think they do? You really think their FIRST response is to deny fault and blame the passenger? That is beyond ridiculous. TSA would also be far better off losing the "we treat all passengers with dignity and respect" line. But maybe they feel if they keep saying it it will one day be true. 100% approval will never happen. The reality is, when followed TSA policies are not an infringement, not a violation of anyone's rights and are designed to be respectful. However, you will always have a small minority such as those who spend their days on this blog who "feel" otherwise. The fact is, by law and by policy they are being treated with respect and dignity. As there will always be a few stray soles who feel otherwise, there will also be a few stray TSA employees who don't follow the rules. That however is true for any business or agency. But to eliminate an accurate statement for the benefit of a very small minority would be meaningless.

Anonymous said...

Wrong again, Bold TSApologist. Your generic attack on critical commenters is not necessary and does not in any way excuse the rude, disrespectful, intimidating rules, procedures, and actions of TSA employees.

Anonymous said...

Bold Posting Intern said... "The reality is, when followed TSA policies are not an infringement, not a violation of anyone's rights and are designed to be respectful. "

Then why do so few of the TSA Agents follow the policies?

If they are designed to be respectful why do we get almost weekly news stories about how disrespectful the Agents were at one or more airports. A minority of agents overall to be sure, but shouldn't you guys police your own so there are even less news stories about not following your own policies?