Friday, August 28, 2015

TSA Week in Review: 48 Firearms, Three-Pounds of Gun Powder, a Stun Cane and More


Loaded firearm.
48 Firearms Discovered This Week– of the 48 firearms discovered, 42 were loaded and 15 had a round chambered. The firearm pictured here was discovered in a carry-on bag at IAH.
Gun powder.
Three one-pound containers of gun powder were discovered in a checked bag at Savannah (SAV). The passenger stated he didn’t know gun powder was prohibited. Gun powder is prohibited in both carry-on and checked bags.

Inert Ordnance and Grenades etc. – We continue to find inert grenades and other weaponry on a weekly basis. Please keep in mind that if an item looks like a real bomb, grenade, mine, etc., it is prohibited. When these items are found at a checkpoint or in checked baggage, they can cause significant delays because the explosives detection professionals must respond to resolve the alarm. Even if they are novelty items, you are prohibited from bringing them on the aircraft.
 
  • Six inert grenades were discovered in a carry-on bag at San Francisco (SFO) resulting in 21 delayed flights affecting 2,943 passengers. 
  • An inert/replica grenade was discovered in a carry-on bag at Dallas (DAL). 
  • An inert/replica grenade was discovered in a carry-on bag at Tampa (TPA). 
  • An inert/replica grenade was discovered in a checked bag at Los Angeles (LAX). 
  • Two flashbang grenades were discovered in a checked bag at Norfolk (ORF). One was inert and the other was spent. 
  • An inert/replica grenade was discovered in a checked bag at Norfolk (ORF).

Inert grenades.
From the left, the pictured grenades were discovered at: DAL, ORF, TPA, ORF and ORF


Artfully Concealed Prohibited Items – Artfully concealed is a term used to describe an item that is intentionally hidden. It could be anything from a knife sewn into the lining of a bag to a sword hidden inside of a walking cane. If a concealed prohibited item is discovered in your bag or on your body, you could be cited and possibly arrested by law enforcement. Here is an example from this week where an artfully concealed item was discovered by our officers.


Firearm components discovered in sealed Lego box.
The following items were discovered concealed inside a sealed Lego box at Ft. Lauderdale (FLL): three AR 15/M 16 bolt firing groups to include bolt carrier, bolt, bolt key, firing pin, bolt cam pin & firing pin retaining pin, three assault rifle flash suppressors, and nearly 100 rifle sights. While firearm components are permitted in checked baggage, they are never permitted in carry-on bags.
Stun cane and cane sword.
A stun cane (top) was discovered in a traveler’s carry-on items at San Antonio (SAT). A cane sword (bottom) was discovered at Las Vegas (LAS).



Miscellaneous Prohibited Items – In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly, officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons and many other prohibited items too numerous to note.
Knives and a throwing star.
Clockwise from the top left, these items were discovered at: PHX, PHX, LGB, DEN, CRP, BNA, BNA, PIT, PHX, SJU and EWR
Flares
These flares were discovered in a carry-on bag at SMF

Stun Guns - 21 stun guns were discovered this week in carry-on bags around the nation. Two were discovered at Baltimore (BWI), two at Minneapolis (MSP), two at Sacramento (SMF), and the remainder were discovered at Atlanta (ATL), Burlington (BTV), Chicago Midway (MDW), Dallas/Fort Worth (DFW), Denver (DEN), Fargo (FAR), Las Vegas (LAS), New Orleans (MSY), New York Kennedy (JFK), New York LaGuardia (LGA), Oakland (OAK), Oklahoma City (OKC), Portland (PDX), San Antonio (SAT) and San Diego (SAN).  

Ammunition – When packed properly, ammunition can be transported in your checked baggage, but it is never permissible to pack ammo in your carry-on bag. 


Loaded Firearms
Clockwise from the top left, these firearms were discovered in carry-on bags at: PHX, ATL, MEM, PHX and ATL
Loaded Firearms
Clockwise from the top, these firearms were discovered in carry-on bags at:SAT, PBI, PBI and DFW


48 Firearms Discovered This Week– of the 48 firearms discovered, 42 were loaded and 15 had a round chambered.

You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms. Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $11,000. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions; that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates.

Read our 2014 Year in Review post! If you haven’t read them yet, make sure you check out our year in review posts for 2011, 2012 and 2013.

Follow @TSA on
Twitter and Instagram!

Bob Burns
TSA Social Media Team


If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact us by
clicking here.

31 comments:

RB said...

The item labeled as an inert/replica grenade that was found at TPA is neither an inert grenade or a replica.

It seems that TSA employees are so poorly trained that they cannot tell that a bottle designed to hold one whole ounce of cologne is just a bottle.

But apparently TSA screeners are taught to molest young ladies and call it screening without any problem.

TSA FAIL!!

Anonymous said...

TSA blotter team,

The first photo of a "grenade" that you claim was found this week is only 2.3 inches long, so it obviously is not a "realistic replica."

The last two don't look much bigger.

A centimeter is not as long as an inch.

Why do you continue to distort photos and facts on this blotter?

Anonymous said...

As always, absolutely nothing you needed your slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners to detect. Meanwhile, how many people suffered physical searches thanks to false alarms on these useless machines?

Why are Curtis Burns and West Cooper unwilling to address, let alone answer, that question?

How many weeks has it been since you last trumpeted something dangerous you found with the naked body scanners?

RB said...

No reader comments have been posted in any article since the morning of August 23, 2015.

Has TSA dispensed with reader comments altogether?

Is it really that difficult for TSA's Burns and company to attend to this taxpayer funded line of communication with TSA in some sort of a timely manner?

RB said...

http://www.philly.com/philly/news/20150830_TSA_takes_a_baby_s_milk.html

Bobbie, you want to comment on this story about Philly TSA?

Sure sounds like another poorly trained, abusive TSA screener.

Neffenger must be proud of the TSA this week.

The Milk Council said...

West, I expect you'll claim, "I don't know, so I cannot comment," but could you actually ask someone about the screener in Philadelphia who opened a baby's milk box and threatened the family with ALL of them getting their breasts, buttocks, and genitals touched if they didn't let him spoil the baby's milk?

Was anyone willing to review the screening area video (if it was 'working') and see if the screener followed or violated SOP?

http://www.philly.com/philly/news/20150830_TSA_takes_a_baby_s_milk.html

Anonymous said...

I'm glad to see the TSA fired the abusive screener in New York. If he is convicted, I hope he goes to prison for a long time. I am concerned about another story:

http://www.philly.com/philly/news/20150830_TSA_takes_a_baby_s_milk.html

What is a passenger supposed to do in this situation? If the milk boxes are opened, they are going to go bad, but your website says liquids like this are allowed.

I presume the size of the milk box is 6 or 8 oz. That would easily fit inside a quart bag. If the milk box was 3 oz, it would have been allowed. What difference does it make if there is one 6 oz box or two 3 oz boxes? The volume of liquid is the same. The two 3 oz boxes could be combined into one container post security.

I see the reason behind the limit on total volume of liquids a passenger is allowed. The quart bag limits total volume. If total volume is limited, why is there a further restriction on individual container size? That makes no sense.

Doober said...

Isn't it interesting that for the last 3 weeks there has been only one thread per page of the blog. Intentionally designed to inhibit "discussion" of topics and posting of comments? I vote "yes."

Why doesn't the TSA just give up on this "rediculous" exercise?

screen shot

Anonymous said...

Why is the TSA blotter team attempting to suppress comments on earlier blogs by only showing a single post on the front page? For years, multiple posts appeared on every blotter page. Who changed the setting, blotter team?

Anonymous said...

Why hasn't my comment about the Philly TSA screener who spoiled a baby's milk been approved, blotter team?

It met blog policy and you approved other comments on the same topic.

Anonymous said...

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense. now you're even allowing college kids (kaydets) to endure more reasonable screening, but those who served and sacrificed for 20+ are out of luck.

RB said...

The item that TSA claims to be a grenade or "replica" grenade found at TPA is nothing more than a 1 fluid ounce bottle of cologne.

Isn't it amazing that our highly trained TSA screeners can't tell a small bottle from a grenade or "replica" grenade.

Anonymous said...

Six inert grenades were discovered in a carry-on bag at San Francisco (SFO) resulting in 21 delayed flights affecting 2,943 passengers.

oh crud...SFO has private security. So even private security is finding fake grenades now...how can we blame TSA when it is private security also...dilemma..

Anonymous said...

What is a passenger supposed to do in this situation? If the milk boxes are opened, they are going to go bad, but your website says liquids like this are allowed.

you have to open the boxes to drink them , right? You are not allowed to bring in more "baby liquids" than is reasonable for the flight. So if you intend on using them during the flight, they will be opened either way. If they are not going to be consumed they aren't supposed to be in carry on bags anyway. Come on people, this is so easy to figure out. Does nobody think anymore?

Anonymous said...

Please treat this as a serious question. Since we aren't allowed to know the TSA's policies and procedures, how do we know when a uniformed TSO is asking us to do something inappropriate?

RB said...

 Anonymous said...Please treat this as a serious question. Since we aren't allowed to know the TSA's policies and procedures, how do we know when a uniformed TSO is asking us to do something inappropriate?August 31, 2015 at 8:16 PM
*****************************
If a TSA employee is asking it's inappropriate.

TSA and its employees has proven they are not to be trusted.

Anonymous said...

you have to open the boxes to drink them , right? You are not allowed to bring in more "baby liquids" than is reasonable for the flight. So if you intend on using them during the flight, they will be opened either way. If they are not going to be consumed they aren't supposed to be in carry on bags anyway. Come on people, this is so easy to figure out. Does nobody think anymore?

August 31, 2015 at 1:56 PM

-----------------------------------------------------------

Of course you have to open them to drink them, but once they are opened, they will go bad without refrigeration. They were carrying these milk boxes that don't require refrigeration to feed a baby later that day. Are they supposed to open the boxes now and hope they can keep them cold enough for use 6-8 hours later? Plus, they went through an airport before and they were allowed.

The bigger point is that this milk box is probably about 6 oz. It would easily inside a quart bag. Why is one 6 oz container of liquid not allowed, but two 3 oz containers are allowed? It's the same volume of liquid and either containers easily fit inside the quart bag that limits the total amount of liquid that can be brought through security. This is a simple question. Why can't somebody from the TSA answer it?

Anonymous said...

"You are not allowed to bring in more "baby liquids" than is reasonable for the flight."

And what training doe TSA screeners receive that makes them better judges of what is a reasonable amount of milk than a child's parents? Indeed, since liquids are harmless, why does TSA persist in this idiotic liquids policy that makes no one safer and wastes a tremendous amount of time and money?

RB said...

Anonymous Anonymous said...
What is a passenger supposed to do in this situation? If the milk boxes are opened, they are going to go bad, but your website says liquids like this are allowed.

you have to open the boxes to drink them , right? You are not allowed to bring in more "baby liquids" than is reasonable for the flight. So if you intend on using them during the flight, they will be opened either way. If they are not going to be consumed they aren't supposed to be in carry on bags anyway. Come on people, this is so easy to figure out. Does nobody think anymore?

August 31, 2015 at 1:56 PM
....................

Ok, Bold Blotter Intern, exactly how much is reasonable? Give us an exact amount.

And you must have a very great mind seeing as how you are able to know if any delays, plane changes, or other issues might happen during a persons travel before they happen.

Based on the statement you made I doubt that you even read the article before spouting off. So let us look at what really happened.

For this particular journey, they brought two milk boxes for Lily - one for the flight from Philly to their layover in Houston; the other for the flight from Houston to Santa Ana, Calif.

Hmm, two milk boxes for what appears to be a full day of flying, Phiily to Houston and then Houston to Santa Ana. Doesn't seem unreasonable to me. Of course TSA won't tell us how they define reasonable so it's a crap shoot as usual when dealing with TSA.

Now let's look at the issues of opening the milk boxes.

The boxes - designed just like juice boxes, right down to the attached straw and push-through seal - don't need refrigeration until they're opened.

So TSA is willing to jeopardize the safety of this young traveler. I thought TSA was to ensure travelers safety.

Ok, the milk boxes are sterile and safe while unopened. Seems like a good thing.

Plus, the TSA permits them on board. On the Bunns' trip to Philly, agents in Santa Ana and Houston passed the milk boxes right through the security scanner and sent the family on their way.

So on the trip to Philly TSA screeners at both Santa Ana and Houston were able to screen milk boxes without opening them. Does that mean that TSA at Santa Ana and Houston are screening improperly? Or it it Philly that needs some management review?

Now this next part of the article is important and I hope you have the ability to comprehend what is being said Bold Blotter Intern.

A spokesman for the TSA told me that, without reviewing security tapes of the Bunns' trip through Stupidville (OK, he didn't call the checkpoint Stupidville), he couldn't comment on the veracity of their complaint. But he assured me that milk boxes, like juice boxes, need not be opened to be screened.

So the milk boxes don't need to be opened per TSA.

So that means that the TSA employees at Philly screwed up. TSA employees at Philly apparently don't know TSA SOP's and that includes supervisors.

Now let's see what TSA has to offer on the matter.

http://www.tsa.gov/travel/special-procedures/traveling-children

It's all right at that link:

Formula, breast milk and juice for infants or toddlers are permitted through the security checkpoint.

Inform the TSA officer if you do not want the formula, breast milk and/or juice to be X-rayed or opened. Additional steps will be taken to clear the liquid and you or the traveling guardian will undergo additional screening procedures, to include a pat-down and screening of other carry-on property.

Lastly Bold Blotter Intern do you have any idea of what happens to an open container of any liquid as it is carried around? Yes it leaks and makes a mess and it spoils if it is milk.

And as shown the real problem is TSA. Poorly trained screeners seem to be the norm and now TSA screeners are threatening the health and safety of travelers.

Feeling safe now?

Susan Richart said...

"you have to open the boxes to drink them , right? You are not allowed to bring in more "baby liquids" than is reasonable for the flight. So if you intend on using them during the flight, they will be opened either way. If they are not going to be consumed they aren't supposed to be in carry on bags anyway. Come on people, this is so easy to figure out. Does nobody think anymore?"

You inability to think logically is on full display with the comment. It's obvious that you don't or can't think at all.

You don't open a box of milk hours before you might need it and you certainly don't try to carry an opened box of any kid's liquid because it will spill long before you've taken your seat on the plane.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Anonymous said...

A lot of cuckoo for Cocoa Puffs people in the comment section.

Anonymous said...

Please treat this as a serious question. Since we aren't allowed to know the TSA's policies and procedures, how do we know when a uniformed TSO is asking us to do something inappropriate?

If a TSO (one stripe) makes the request and it seems unusual, ask for a supervisor (3 stripes). If you still feel it is not right, ask for a police officer. You cannot be forced to do anything. If TSA is making demands, ask for a police officer. Contrary to what people here seem to think, there are corrupt people in every profession. There are bad TSA officers just as there are bad police officers, bad fireman and bad doctors. When in doubt, ask for someone else to witness the screening. You can even have your own travel companions witness the screening. You have rights.

Anonymous said...

Bold TSApologist, your comment about bringing baby food/drink on a plane (and subsequent insult) have no merit because as you have stated, you are not a TSA employee, so cannot say what the hidden policies are.

Also, if you had bothered to read the article, you'd know the parents didn't plan to give the baby her milk for a couple of hours after going through the screening area. By that time, the unsealed milk could have spilled and would have spoiled.

Were you thinking?

Anonymous said...

Bold TSApologist, SFO has a private contracting company who answers to the TSA and must follow TSA's secret policies and procedures.

The TSA set these ridiculous (for you, "rediculous") rules, so yes, they get the blame.

Why do you not know this? Didn't your friend or loved one who works for the TSA tell you?

RB said...

Thought I was seeing some improvement on the comment posting but still looks like it is two or three times a week and censorship is still in full force even though censorship by government on a taxpayer funded activity is blatantly illegal.

So much for those Oaths you TSA people took. Lie much?

Anonymous said...

sometimes reading this blog makes my head spin. Its like talking to a child who says "why" to everything rather than using logic to answer their own question.
The question of "how much liquid" is not what is being discussed. The question was regarding milk that was spoiled and why does it have to be opened. Stay on topic folks. If the milk is going as carry on, it is assumed it will be consumed Regardless of the amount. If there is more than is going to be consumed, it should not be in carry on. Opening a milk is not going to cause it to spoil if it consumed on a flight.

Anonymous said...

Formula, breast milk and juice for infants or toddlers are permitted through the security checkpoint.

Inform the TSA officer if you do not want the formula, breast milk and/or juice to be X-rayed or opened. Additional steps will be taken to clear the liquid and you or the traveling guardian will undergo additional screening procedures, to include a pat-down and screening of other carry-on property.

do you know if those additional steps where offered? Where they declined? I don't.

RB said...

 Anonymous said...Formula, breast milk and juice for infants or toddlers are permitted through the security checkpoint.Inform the TSA officer if you do not want the formula, breast milk and/or juice to be X-rayed or opened. Additional steps will be taken to clear the liquid and you or the traveling guardian will undergo additional screening procedures, to include a pat-down and screening of other carry-on property.
......
do you know if those additional steps where offered? Where they declined? I don't.September 4, 2015 at 12:51 PM
?...........?

The issue is that TSA skipped over xray and ETD testing in this incident and went straight to opening the two milk boxes clearly not following TSA guidelines.

Bottom line, TSA makes the traveler less safe when traveling.

Anonymous said...

Bold TSApologist,

The two milk cartons were going to be consumed over a several-hour trip. If one or both were opened at the beginning of the trip, it or they would be spoiled or spilled before the milk was supposed to be consumed.

Again, logic. Opening a milk carton at 10am when is it supposed to be consumed at 2pm would spoil or spill the milk during those 4 hours.

According to the TSA website, and I believe the TSA spokesperson, the milk should have been allowed and only one parent, not all members of a family, could possibly be subject to touching of his/her genitals, buttocks, and breasts.

Sealed milk cartons were allowed by two other airports' TSA screeners during that trip.

Sealed milk cartons can also be examined without opening or can be x-rayed, according to what the TSA has said publicly.

The family wasn't given the correct options by the TSA screener. Where's the logic in that?

Anonymous said...

Bold TSApologist, read the article and you'll know what the TSA screener "offered".

Anonymous said...

I don't understand all these complaints at all. THANK YOU TSA for keeping us safe. I WANT you to check the bags, my person, items etc. I WANT to be safe - I want to get home safely to my family and loved ones. Likewise for them when travelling. No one needs replica anything on planes...and some small inconveniences (which should be allowed for while travelling these days anyway!?) is preferable over anything terrible that COULD happen. If you don't like it - drive to your destination. It is YOUR choice. Again - THANK YOU TSA. You are doing a great job catching ALL these PROHIBITED items!