Friday, June 26, 2015

TSA Week in Review: 54 Firearms, Swords, Comb Knife, and More


Loaded firearm.
54 Firearms Discovered This Week – Of the 54 firearms discovered, 46 were loaded and 17 had a round chambered. The firearms pictured above was discovered at (LAS). 

Artfully Concealed Prohibited Items – Artfully concealed is a term used to describe an item that was intentionally hidden. It could be anything from a knife sewn into the lining of a bag to a sword hidden inside of a walking cane. If a concealed prohibited item is discovered in your bag or on your body, you could be cited and possibly arrested by law enforcement. Here are some examples from this week where artfully concealed items were discovered by our officers.

  • A cane sword was discovered at LaGuardia (LGA).
  • A knife was discovered taped to the pull handle mechanism of a carry-on bag at Kansas City (MCI).
  • A comb knife was discovered at Kansas City (MCI).
  • A switchblade was discovered hidden in a shoe inside of a carry-on bag at Newport News/Williamsburg (PHF).


Concelaed knife in baggage, and a comb knife.
L-R - Concealed knife ( MCI), Comb Knife (MCI)
Inert Ordnance and Grenades etc. – We continue to find inert grenades and other weaponry on a weekly basis. Please keep in mind that if an item looks like a real bomb, grenade, mine, etc., it is prohibited. When these items are found at a checkpoint or in checked baggage, they can cause significant delays because the explosives detection professionals must respond to resolve the alarm. Even if they are novelty items, you are prohibited from bringing them on the aircraft.

  • Four inert/replica grenades were discovered this week in carry-on bags. Two were discovered at Las Vegas (LAS) and the others were discovered at Denver (DEN) and Indianapolis (IND).
  • One inert/replica grenade was discovered in a checked bag at Louisville (SDF).


Knives, swords, and throwing stars.
Counterclockwise from top, items discovered at: LAX, DAL, BUR, DFW, PVD, ORD, RIC and SFO
Miscellaneous Prohibited Items – In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly, officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons and many other prohibited items too numerous to note.

Stun Guns - 24 stun guns were discovered this week in carry-on bags across the nation. Three were discovered at Dallas Love (DAL), two at Nashville (BNA), two at Orlando (MCO), two at Spokane (GEG), and the remainder were discovered at Chicago O'Hare (ORD), Dallas/Fort Worth (DFW), Fayetteville (FAY), Houston Intercontinental (IAH), Kansas City (MCI), Lafayette (LFT), New Bern (EWN), Norfolk (ORF), Oakland (OAK), Oklahoma City (OKC), Pensacola (PNS), Portland (PDX), Providence (PVD), San Jose (SJC), and Seattle (SEA).

Ammunition
When packed properly, ammunition can be transported in your checked baggage, but it is never permissible to pack ammo in your carry-on bag. This ammo was discovered in a carry-on bag this week at (IAH).
Loaded Firearms
Clockwise from top left, firearms discovered at: BNA, MDW, STL, EUG, JAN, and AUS
Loaded Firearms
Clockwise from top left, firearms discovered at: PHX, IND, MSY, MIA, BQK, IAH, and MSY
54 Firearms Discovered This Week – Of the 54 firearms discovered, 46 were loaded and 17 had a round chambered.
You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms. Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $11,000. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions; that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

 *In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates.

Read our 2014 Year in Review post! If you haven’t read them yet, make sure you check out our year in review posts for 2011, 2012 and 2013.

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Bob Burns
TSA Social Media Team

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20 comments:

Anonymous said...

Exactly what is the point of these weekly policy blotter entries, where the number of guns confiscated remains pretty much the same from week to week?

If it's to serve as a deterrent, clearly it's failing, given that the same number of guns continue to be found week after week.

If it's to show that the TSA serve a vital security mission, it's a failure too, since according to this 1985 article -- https://news.google.com/newspapers?id=57UzAAAAIBAJ&sjid=oTIHAAAAIBAJ&pg=4844,6538112&hl=en -- screeners found just about the same number of guns each week, with far fewer total passengers, and solely with metal detectors and bag x-ray machines.

Of course I fully expect this question to be ignored, but what *is* the point of these posts, besides providing yet more make-work, a skill at which your organization excels?

Anonymous said...

As always, absolutely nothing you needed your slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners to detect. Meanwhile, how many people suffered physical searches thanks to false alarms on these useless machines?

Why are Curtis Burns and West Cooper unwilling to address, let alone answer, that question?

How many weeks has it been since you last trumpeted something dangerous you found with the naked body scanners?

RB said...

Still no valid need for extremely expensive Whole Body Scanners, TSA's original name for the electronic strip search machines.

CliffOnTheRoad said...

Fear will get the American public to accept anything, including giving up Freedoms. Induced or created by whom? People with their own agenda wanting to justify their actions and existance.

But last weeks blog is equally interesting. Read carefully: "The frame of the gun was ... in a CHECKED bag. The grip and firing pin ... in the carry-on bag ...." Does this make it a gun posing a threat to the traveling public, or show the length the TSA will go to make headlines?

Anonymous said...

"Exactly what is the point of these weekly policy blotter entries, where the number of guns confiscated remains pretty much the same from week to week?

Of course I fully expect this question to be ignored, but what *is* the point of these posts, besides providing yet more make-work, a skill at which your organization excels?"

So why do you waste your time reading it every week if it is so pointless? Seems you are quite facinated by reading it week after week.

Anonymous said...

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense. now you're even allowing college kids (kaydets) to endure more reasonable screening, but those who sacrificed for 20+ have to take their bloody shoes and belts off!! it's pretty clear that TSA doesn't understand risk assessment or risk-based anything, much less security.

Anonymous said...

Jeeez.. we KNOW people accidentally or on purpose attempt to bring weapons on board. WHO CARES. Is this blog simply to tell people how many guns were brought to the TSA line??

How about some entries that actually EDUCATE and inform the public? Such as "elderly woman had knitting needles taken away even though she was informed they were not contraband"

or "you may legally bring a sandwich on board"

These guns stories are boring, tedious, and every entry is the same. Guns, guns guns. And anyone is a moron if they have to be alerted that a weapon is not allowed. ONE entry on weapons on this blog is enough!

Anonymous said...

Still no table of the number of confiscated water bottles? I would have thought that statistics for avoiding such terrible weapons being carried on planes would be an important way to show that the TSA is achieving something.

Anonymous said...

Time for a new Blog Team.

6 comments since Friday afternoon. Of course we don't know how many comments have been censored.

Blogger Bob Burns has distanced himself from any personal impact with the blog and no longer makes any kind of difference here.

One of the most boring and unproductive blogs in the entire blogosphere.

CliffOnTheRoad said...

To Anon; you address the TSA via your 'your', and you direct your comments to us when you wrote 'you.' Slightly confusing.

To Anon2; your cut-n-paste of the same text is falling on deaf ears, or being approved by someone who can not change the policy. As if you bother to come back and read this, I do not favor giving a blanket pass to someone who is out of the military. Over time, without observation, who knows if the person has snapped and would do something weird.

Far fetched example (but true); A vet 2 years ago was discharged at end of duty. He was getting pills for some non-physical disorder. Instead of injesting them, as prescribed, he was crushing and snorting them to get high.
He even staged a robbery (with police report) to try to get more pills. The VA denied the early refill, thankfully. But the guy was strung out too often.

RB said...

Admiral Neffenger was confirmed as Secretary of TSA on June 23. Now the evening of June 29 and TSA.GOV has not updated its leadership web page to reflect the new Secretary.

Seems mighty disrespectful to me but who expects any thing else out of TSA.

Anonymous said...

Bobby and West are STILL refusing to address the fact that the TSA employs a known perjurer as a blue-suiter at PHL.

Good job, West and Bobby. Keep fighting the good fight to protect the criminals amongst your ranks!

SSSS for Some Reason said...

CliffOnTheRoad said...Over time, without observation, who knows if the person has snapped and would do something weird.

So pre-crime then. Stop them before they commit a crime because they might have snapped and be about ready to commit a crime.

RB said...

CliffOnTheRoad said...To Anon;

As if you bother to come back and read this, I do not favor giving a blanket pass to someone who is out of the military. Over time, without observation, who knows if the person has snapped and would do something weird.Far fetched example (but true); A vet 2 years ago was discharged at end of duty. He was getting pills for some non-physical disorder. Instead of injesting them, as prescribed, he was crushing and snorting them to get high.He even staged a robbery (with police report) to try to get more pills. The VA denied the early refill, thankfully. But the guy was strung out too often.

June 29, 2015 at 7:12 PM
_________________________________

What is being asked for is consideration for military retirees being considered for Pre Check. Just being a Vet is not the point. Military retirees have a 20+ year history that is documented. People who have operated or maintained airplanes, ships, tanks, missile systems and all manner of other weapons systems.

These military retirees are much more trustworthy than TSA employees who automatically are given Pre Check.

GSOLTSO said...

Rb sez - "Admiral Neffenger was confirmed as Secretary of TSA on June 23. Now the evening of June 29 and TSA.GOV has not updated its leadership web page to reflect the new Secretary.

Seems mighty disrespectful to me but who expects any thing else out of TSA."

I can see your point of view, and would possibly agree with it, if his appointment had been immediate. Adm.Neffinger has not actually left his post with the Coast Guard at this point, he will be coming on board in an official capacity later this month. So, technically, he is not the Administrator yet.

West
TSA Blog Team

Anonymous said...

West, if you don't know the answer to a question, why don't you ask someone at the TSA who knows? Someone who can and will comment on policies and procedures.

Saying "I don't know" or continually ignoring questions doesn't absolve you or the TSA from answering questions from the American public.

If you will not answer a question or if the TSA employee who can answer a question refuses to do so, just say so. Let's get some truth, transparency, and accountability in our government!

RB said...

 GSOLTSO said...

Rb sez - "Admiral Neffenger was confirmed as Secretary of TSA on June 23. Now the evening of June 29 and TSA.GOV has not updated its leadership web page to reflect the new Secretary. Seems mighty disrespectful to me but who expects any thing else out of TSA."
*********
I can see your point of view, and would possibly agree with it, if his appointment had been immediate. Adm.Neffinger has not actually left his post with the Coast Guard at this point, he will be coming on board in an official capacity later this month. So, technically, he is not the Administrator yet.
West
TSA Blog Team
July 2, 2015 at 11:50 AM
*************
Appointed by the President, confirmed by the Senate. Sure looks to me that he has the job.

@SkyWayManAz said...

I've never had a problem with TSA posting pics of "scary guns". They'd be laughed at if they posted pics of "scary toothpaste" so not sure why they thought "scary money" would get them attaboys. I would never travel with cash in checked bags because it would almost certainly be stolen. Just like happened in this case. I'm sure TSA has weasel words to explain how it wasn't really stolen but that's a distinction without a difference. TSA has been warned previously on this issue by the legal system but clearly needs a reminder.

Anonymous said...

RB said...
GSOLTSO said...

Rb sez - "Admiral Neffenger was confirmed as Secretary of TSA on June 23. Now the evening of June 29 and TSA.GOV has not updated its leadership web page to reflect the new Secretary. Seems mighty disrespectful to me but who expects any thing else out of TSA."
*********
I can see your point of view, and would possibly agree with it, if his appointment had been immediate. Adm.Neffinger has not actually left his post with the Coast Guard at this point, he will be coming on board in an official capacity later this month. So, technically, he is not the Administrator yet.
West
TSA Blog Team
July 2, 2015 at 11:50 AM
*************
Appointed by the President, confirmed by the Senate. Sure looks to me that he has the job.

July 3, 2015 at 2:05 PM
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
hate to say it RB, but he's correct on this one. the admiral's retirement ceremony is not until the 10th, and he probably cannot formally take the job until he is formally retired, which is likely the end of Sep, Oct, or Nov. depends on how much leave he has built up. there may be exceptions, but normally folks aren't allowed to "double-dip" as both active duty & government civilian.

Anonymous said...

RB said...
CliffOnTheRoad said...To Anon;

As if you bother to come back and read this, I do not favor giving a blanket pass to someone who is out of the military. Over time, without observation, who knows if the person has snapped and would do something weird.Far fetched example (but true); A vet 2 years ago was discharged at end of duty. He was getting pills for some non-physical disorder. Instead of injesting them, as prescribed, he was crushing and snorting them to get high.He even staged a robbery (with police report) to try to get more pills. The VA denied the early refill, thankfully. But the guy was strung out too often.

June 29, 2015 at 7:12 PM
_________________________________

What is being asked for is consideration for military retirees being considered for Pre Check. Just being a Vet is not the point. Military retirees have a 20+ year history that is documented. People who have operated or maintained airplanes, ships, tanks, missile systems and all manner of other weapons systems.

These military retirees are much more trustworthy than TSA employees who automatically are given Pre Check.

July 1, 2015 at 8:17 PM
---------------------------------------------------------------
and the point is less directed at how trustworthy retirees are, but how people with much less track record are being treated as "low risk" & given Pre-check status, but not those who served for an extended period of time. it's about TSA's inability to make reasonable decisions about levels of risk, and the indications that they allow PR to become a significant factor, rather than real risk analysis.