Friday, May 1, 2015

TSA Week in Review: 49 Firearms, Two Live Flashbang Grenades, a Replica Claymore Mine, and More

49 Firearms Discovered This Week
49 Firearms Discovered This Week – Of the 49 firearms, 44 were loaded and 23 had rounds chambered. The firearm pictured here was discovered at Charlotte (CLT).
Two live Chilean military flashbang grenades were discovered in a carry-on bag at Jackson (JAN).
Two live Chilean military flashbang grenades were discovered in a carry-on bag at Jackson (JAN).
Inert Ordnance and Grenades etc. – We continue to find inert grenades and other weaponry on a weekly basis. Please keep in mind that if an item looks like a real bomb, grenade, mine, etc., it is prohibited. When these items are found at a checkpoint or in checked baggage, they can cause significant delays because the explosives detection professionals must respond to resolve the alarm. Even if they are novelty items, you are prohibited from bringing them on the aircraft.

A replica Claymore mine was discovered in a checked back at Las Vegas (LAS).
A replica Claymore mine was discovered in a checked back along with CO2 cartridges at Las Vegas (LAS).
Miscellaneous Prohibited Items – In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly, officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons and many other prohibited items too numerous to note.

Clockwise from top left, these items were discovered in carry-on bags at SNA, SJU, DAL, BUR, SAN, OAK, SAN, LGA, HNL, and BHM.
Clockwise from top left, these items were discovered in carry-on bags at SNA, SJU, DAL, BUR, SAN, OAK, SAN, LGA, HNL, and BHM.
From the top, sparklers discovered at SEA, and MCO
From the top, sparklers discovered at SEA, and MCO
Stun Guns - 24 stun guns were discovered this week in carry-on bags. Four were discovered at Salt Lake City (SLC), two at Dallas Love (DAL), two at Dallas/Fort Worth (DFW), two at Oakland (OAK), and the remainder were discovered at Albuquerque (ABQ), Atlanta (ATL), Cheyenne (CYS), Denver (DEN), Detroit (DTW), Kansas City (MCI), Las Vegas (LAS), New Orleans (MSY), Orange County (SNA), Portland (PDX), Redmond (RDM), Reno (RNO), Sacramento (SMF), and Wilmington (ILM).

Ammunition – When packed properly, ammunition can be transported in your checked baggage, but it is never permissible to pack ammo in your carry-on bag.


Clockwise from top left, these firearms were discovered in carry-on bags at CLT, ATL, BNA, GSP, ANC, TYS, and JFK.
Clockwise from top left, these firearms were discovered in carry-on bags at CLT, ATL, BNA, GSP, ANC, TYS, and JFK.

Clockwise from top left, these firearms were discovered in carry-on bags at BNA, OAJ, STL, ECP, and ATL.
Clockwise from top left, these firearms were discovered in carry-on bags at BNA, OAJ, STL, ECP, and ATL.
Clockwise from top left, these firearms were discovered in carry-on bags at PGV, RNO, PHX, IND, and AUS
Clockwise from top left, these firearms were discovered in carry-on bags at PGV, RNO, PHX, IND, and AUS.

Firearms Discovered in Carry-On Bags chart
*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates.

You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms. Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $11,000. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions; that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

Read our 2014 Year in Review post! If you haven’t read them yet, make sure you check out our year in review posts for 2011, 2012 and 2013.


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Bob Burns
TSA Blog Team


If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact us by clicking here.

36 comments:

SSSS for Some Reason said...

"...sparklers discovered at SEA, and ???"

Really?

I know sparklers are a prohibited item. But really? You are going to try and pad your numbers with this kind of fluss and then ask for a gold star for completing the most basic part of your job?

Eight billion dollars a year so you can brag about finding some sparklers in an airport even you can't name?

Anonymous said...

As always, absolutely nothing you needed your slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners to detect. Meanwhile, how many people suffered physical searches thanks to false alarms on these useless machines?

Why are Curtis Burns and West Cooper unwilling to address, let alone answer, that question?

How many weeks has it been since you last trumpeted something dangerous you found with the naked body scanners?

Anonymous said...

You 2 guys were slow this week. Do you really have a life?

RB said...

"The TSA does not, as a matter of policy, share baggage theft reports with local police department."

I read the above quote in an article about TSA. Is the quote true? If it is then who is TSA protecting? TSA employees like the one who perjured himself in a court of law? Or just common TSA thieves of which there seems to be and endless supply?

RB said...

 Anonymous said...
As always, absolutely nothing you needed your slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners to detect. Meanwhile, how many people suffered physical searches thanks to false alarms on these useless machines?Why are Curtis Burns and West Cooper unwilling to address, let alone answer, that question?How many weeks has it been since you last trumpeted something dangerous you found with the naked body scanners?
May 2, 2015 at 11:40 AM
===================
The answer to one of your questions is simple.
Some people are brave and some are not.

Which type do you think your asking questions of here?

Anonymous said...

If you don't know where the sparklers photo came from, the TSA cannot be trusted to provide accurate information and we, the American people, will seriously doubt the photo was taken at any airport.

This blog has a history of reusing photos of allegedly found weapons, which throws the TSA's claims of weekly finds into serious doubt.

Anonymous said...

West, what are the names of all TSA/DHS employees and contractors who have comment moderation privileges on this blog?

Anonymous said...

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense. now you're even allowing college kids (kaydets) to endure more reasonable screening, but those who served and sacrificed for 20+ have to take their bloody shoes and belts off!!

RB said...

Are TSA employees gifted with Pre Check?

If they are has the $85 fee that everyone else has to pay been reported to the IRS?

SSSS for Some Reason said...

Anonymous said...
You 2 guys were slow this week. Do you really have a life?

May 2, 2015 at 7:26 PM

~~~~~~~~~

West and Burns..... you are slipping. Personal attacks are one of the no-no's around here. You can't expect us to follow your rules when you yourself don't follow your rules.

Anonymous said...

I question why there is a provision for posting comments to this article at all. What earthly good does it do? Only provides a public venue for haters to vent. If TSA is wasting any money, it's that associated with this comment portion of the blog. Take it down.

Anonymous said...

I open this every week to compare what's being found by TSA versus the average beat cop...and find an interesting difference. Those who fly seem to have a taste for the more expensive (SIG, etc.) and far more semi autos than revolvers.

Anonymous said...

"RB said...
Are TSA employees gifted with Pre Check?

If they are has the $85 fee that everyone else has to pay been reported to the IRS?

May 4, 2015 at 7:30 AM"
----------------
Ah, RB, There's that famous "reaching" we've come to know and love you for. Even when you have nothing to post you manage to dig up some trivial nonsense.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
I question why there is a provision for posting comments to this article at all. What earthly good does it do? Only provides a public venue for haters to vent. If TSA is wasting any money, it's that associated with this comment portion of the blog. Take it down.

May 4, 2015 at 9:44 AM
.................
It was TSA's choice to allow comments on this blog yet TSA and its bloggers have consistently failed to comply with the Constitution and their sworn oaths. Add in all of the dishonesty put forth by these TSA employees and it is little wonder than comments run to the negative.

I don't see why comments, positive or negative, should bother you so much. If the negative comments are not true then those facts will come out eventually. If they are true then shouldn't you be concerned that TSA is a mismanaged agency that needs close supervision by Congress?

If the comments bother you so much why not read something else? Maybe this site is more befitting of your needs.

http://www.kiddyhouse.com/

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
I question why there is a provision for posting comments to this article at all. What earthly good does it do? Only provides a public venue for haters to vent. If TSA is wasting any money, it's that associated with this comment portion of the blog. Take it down.

May 4, 2015 at 9:44 AM

--------------------------------

I feel the same way about the posting of all the weapons the TSA finds each week, especially the guns. Everybody knows you can't bring a gun on a plane. The TSA should be finding all of the guns. If they can't find a gun, what else is being missed?

I can see posting about the sparklers. Some people might not realize they are prohibited. They should know better but some of the TSA rules are strange. You can bring giant knitting needles and some scissors (basically two knives hinged together), but you can't bring a small pocket knife with a 1" blade.

Anonymous said...

> I question why there is a provision for posting comments to this article at all.

I just opened this week's article in case there was a point to it.

The comments may not have one, but I think no less than the entire blog post.

Maybe those of us who don't work for the TSA should start blogs with articles about our daily jobs: "Cleaned toilet. Five pieces of paper left on the floor. Three bars of soap. One razor. Remember, when you are using public facilities, be careful about leaving your razor, it could cut someone!"

Anonymous said...

Hey Anonymous of May 4, 2015, there are positive and negative comments on this blog. The TSA is a government agency and this is a public government website. No matter what you think of the TSA or this blog, it still has an obligation to accept and post comments from the American public.

Kat said...

Anonymous of May 4, 2015 at 2:53 PM: Actually, I think RB's comment about a possible perk of Pre-Check is valid. After all, I can't afford Pre-Check.

Anonymous said...

So the TSA nudie-scans and/or gropes the passengers who don't pay the brib- er 'Pre-check', but the airport employees are free to come and go with no checks.

http://www.katu.com/news/investigators/No-daily-security-checks-for-some-PDX-employees-301483461.html

"“Cargo agents … customer service agents, ground service agents do not go through security at all,”...Those same employees have access to the tarmac and parked airplanes."
"Most airports in the country operate like PDX – allowing certain employees access to planes without going through a daily security check."

So, the people who actually have access to the planes, the cargo holds, etc, they don't even get checked. While the passengers get their nail files and water bottles stolen.

RB said...

Anonymous said...
"RB said...
Are TSA employees gifted with Pre Check?

If they are has the $85 fee that everyone else has to pay been reported to the IRS?

May 4, 2015 at 7:30 AM"
----------------
Ah, RB, There's that famous "reaching" we've come to know and love you for. Even when you have nothing to post you manage to dig up some trivial nonsense.

May 4, 2015 at 2:53 PM

...................
Not reaching at all.

Don't you believe that everyone should pay their fair share of taxes?

Gifts are income and in total if all of TSA is gifted with Pre Check that is a substantial amount of possible tax revenue.

If gifts of this type reportable under current tax laws then shouldn't TSA comply with the law?

The first issue is why won't TSA or its blog team answer the simple question asked; do TSA employees get Pre Check automatically?

There is no possible way that the answer is SSI.

Are they trying to hide something?

RB said...

Anonymous said...
So the TSA nudie-scans and/or gropes the passengers who don't pay the brib- er 'Pre-check', but the airport employees are free to come and go with no checks.

http://www.katu.com/news/investigators/No-daily-security-checks-for-some-PDX-employees-301483461.html

"“Cargo agents … customer service agents, ground service agents do not go through security at all,”...Those same employees have access to the tarmac and parked airplanes."
"Most airports in the country operate like PDX – allowing certain employees access to planes without going through a daily security check."

So, the people who actually have access to the planes, the cargo holds, etc, they don't even get checked. While the passengers get their nail files and water bottles stolen.

May 6, 2015 at 10:54 AM
..............
No one should be surprised.

TSA has never secured any airport under their control. TSA can Strip Search passengers, conduct illegal interrogations, illegally detain, and carry out all manner of other Civil Rights violations but TSA refuses to secure the employee side of airports.

TSA Security Allows Aiprot Employees to Steal from Passengers

I will probably be accused of not being a Security Expert by TSORon or some other nameless TSA hack, but it doesn't take a lot of common sense to know that if people can steal from passengers checked bags and are never screened when entering or exiting the secure areas of an airport they can certainly introduce any kind of contraband they like.

There is no Security when TSA is on the Job!


Wintermute said...

RB aid...

"I will probably be accused of not being a Security Expert by TSORon or some other nameless TSA hack, "

Don't worry, RB. I AM a security expert (according to these certs I've got, anyhow) and I agree with you on most things security-related.

Susan Richart said...

West said in another thread:

"...certain HQ elements approve comments."

Are these "elements" human beings? If so what can't you say "certain individuals at HQ approve comments"?

IMO, West using the term "elements" is further proof that the TSA cares not one whit about people, whether those people are passengers or TSA employees.

So who at HQ approves comments, West, or is that SSI? Under what circumstances would an individual at HQ be asked to approve a comment? Is that SSI also?

The deceipt by the TSA goes on and on and on.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

GSOLTSO said...

Susan sez - "Are these "elements" human beings? If so what can't you say "certain individuals at HQ approve comments"?

IMO, West using the term "elements" is further proof that the TSA cares not one whit about people, whether those people are passengers or TSA employees.

So who at HQ approves comments, West, or is that SSI? Under what circumstances would an individual at HQ be asked to approve a comment? Is that SSI also?

The deceipt by the TSA goes on and on and on."

My use of the term "elements" is simply a descriptor left over from my time in the military - nothing more, nothing less.

I do not know the names of the people (or not all of them, I know the Blog team members) at HQ that can approve comments. I would venture a guess that there are some folks in the OPR branch, and in the Administrators office that have the ability to do so. I have no idea what situation would generate those unknown folks moderating or creating content – maybe in case of a National Emergency or fairly serious security situation that would require an immediate generation of content or comment approvals… Of course, all of those are guesses on my part, because I am merely a moderator/commenter. There is no “deciept” in what I have posted, merely a lack of knowledge in reference to the other people the company gives access to. I can tell you that none of the “Anons” here are posting in an official capacity for the organization.

West
TSA Blog Team

Susan Richart said...

West wrote:

"My use of the term "elements" is simply a descriptor left over from my time in the military"

You've not been in the military for several years now so it's time to use civilian words.

Sorry, West, the TSA never tells the whole truth and nothing but the truth. Prime example of that is the thread about the traveler arrested in Philadelphia.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Anonymous said...

West, we'll remember you said, "none of the “Anons” here are posting in an official capacity for the organization."

Anonymous said...

TSA employees can opt in or opt out of the Pre-Check for no cost.

Anonymous said...

This is not considered SSI. TSA employees can opt in or opt out of precheck for no cost.

RB said...

 Susan Richart said..

.West wrote:"My use of the term "elements" is simply a descriptor left over from my time in the military"

You've not been in the military for several years now so it's time to use civilian words.Sorry, West, the TSA never tells the whole truth and nothing but the truth. Prime example of that is the thread about the traveler arrested in Philadelphia.screen shot/DHS OIG statement

May 7, 2015 at 4:33 PM
......................
Susan, I was in the military too and never heard individuals referred to as elements.

RB said...

 Anonymous said...This is not considered SSI. TSA employees can opt in or opt out of precheck for no cost.
May 8, 2015 at 7:56 PM
?..............?
How is this Opt In/Opt Out done? Is it a one time choice or before each flight? I'm trying to understand how or if the Pre Check emblem is printed on the boarding pass in this situation.

Another curiosity, are all federal LEO types gifted with Pre Check or do they fall in a different category altogether? We know that many federal agencies feel a need for their own police force.

GSOLTSO said...

Susan sez "You've not been in the military for several years now so it's time to use civilian words."

I think I will simply continue to choose my speech patterns, colloquialisms and terminology. Thanks for the suggestion though.

RB sez -"Susan, I was in the military too and never heard individuals referred to as elements."

I never used elements as a term for an individual, it was a collective term. Also, you were in a different branch - which would have a different terminology base to start with. We would have lots of crossover, but a lot of differing terms intrinsic to each separate branch.

West
TSA Blog Team

RB said...

GSOLTSO said...
Susan sez "You've not been in the military for several years now so it's time to use civilian words."

I think I will simply continue to choose my speech patterns, colloquialisms and terminology. Thanks for the suggestion though.

RB sez -"Susan, I was in the military too and never heard individuals referred to as elements."

I never used elements as a term for an individual, it was a collective term.

Also, you were in a different branch - which would have a different terminology base to start with. We would have lots of crossover, but a lot of differing terms intrinsic to each separate branch.
WestTSA Blog Team
May 9, 2015 at 12:40 PM
----------------

West, regardless of our different military backgrounds I did have opportunities to work with other branches and some units from other countries.

I have heard "elements" used to describe certain units within a larger force but never in respect to an individual which seemed to be what you where alluding to in your earlier post. You say you are not speaking of individuals so you must be speaking of a whole department, division, or other group. Surprising such a large "element" would have full access to the TSA Blog and still be unknown to the TSA bloggers.

Very odd indeed.

RB said...

At DFW this morning 100% of passengers I witnessed were alarming the MMW Strip Search Machine.

100% false alarm rate.

GSOLTSO said...

RB sez - "West, regardless of our different military backgrounds I did have opportunities to work with other branches and some units from other countries.

I have heard "elements" used to describe certain units within a larger force but never in respect to an individual which seemed to be what you where alluding to in your earlier post. You say you are not speaking of individuals so you must be speaking of a whole department, division, or other group. Surprising such a large "element" would have full access to the TSA Blog and still be unknown to the TSA bloggers.

Very odd indeed."

As did I, in several different countries, as well as several different units of 3 of the other 4 branches - and I still see new phrases/shorthand commentary/nicknames specific to each branch. Within each unit/team, I have seen that there could be an even further difference in use as well. Suffice to say, your use of "element" may have been different than mine.

I have heard many varying uses of the word element, mostly I use it to describe a part of something larger (such as "the blog team is an element of TSA").

So, let me get this straight, you have always known which people in the upper chain of command read or had access to your operational systems? At all times? I have not, many times in my history, I have been lucky to know what my part in an operation was! I am certain that there are "elements" in HQ that have the ability to access the blog without a requirement to notify me that they have said access.

West
TSA Blog Team

RB said...

GSOLTSO said

"As did I, in several different countries, as well as several different units of 3 of the other 4 branches - and I still see new phrases/shorthand commentary/nicknames specific to each branch. Within each unit/team, I have seen that there could be an even further difference in use as well. Suffice to say, your use of "element" may have been different than mine.I have heard many varying uses of the word element, mostly I use it to describe a part of something larger (such as "the blog team is an element of TSA").So, let me get this straight, you have always known which people in the upper chain of command read or had access to your operational systems? At all times? I have not, many times in my history, I have been lucky to know what my part in an operation was! I am certain that there are "elements" in HQ that have the ability to access the blog without a requirement to notify me that they have said access."
West TSA Blog Team
May 12, 2015 at 5:21 AM
-----------------------
Seems you are trying to deflect instead of responding to the query. But seriously, what were you in the military? An E-5 perhaps? If so that would explain your lack of knowing details of many things.

The TSA Blog is a fairly small operation within TSA. So yes I would expect you to know who had access to post new material, who could post as an Anon and approve their own comment, and things like that.

It's been pretty clear that some things being posted here are most likely that of some unknown TSA actor.

Anonymous said...

West, since you are unwilling to do the basics of public service and look at this blog's admin panel, ASK someone willing to do their job.

So you can't play "dumb goid guy trying to change things from within," here is the question again: What are the names of the TSA employees and contractors who have admin and moderation rights on this blog?