Friday, April 17, 2015

TSA Week in Review: 31 Loaded Firearms, 10 Inert Grenades, and 3 Propane Tanks Discovered in Carry-on Bags This Week

Loaded Firearm Discovered in Carry-on Bag (LEX)
Loaded Firearm Discovered in Carry-on Bag (LEX)
40 Firearms Discovered This Week – Of the 40 firearms, 31 were loaded and 13 had rounds chambered.
       
Clockwise From Top Left Corner, Grenades Discovered at: BWI, BWI, CAE, LAS, PHX, and MDT
Clockwise From Top Left Corner, Grenades Discovered at: BWI, BWI, CAE, LAS, PHX, and MDT
Inert Ordnance and Grenades etc. – We continue to find inert grenades and other weaponry on a weekly basis. Please keep in mind that if an item looks like a real bomb, grenade, mine, etc., it is prohibited. When these items are found at a checkpoint or in checked baggage, they can cause significant delays because the explosives detection professionals must respond to resolve the alarm. Even if they are novelty items, you are prohibited from bringing them on the aircraft.
  • 10 inert/replica/novelty grenades were discovered around the nation this week. Six were discovered in checked bags (two at Baltimore (BWI), two at Columbia (CAE), Phoenix (PHX) and Minneapolis (MSP)), and four were discovered in carry-on bags (Harrisburg (MDT), Lihue (LIH), Las Vegas (LAS), and Baltimore (BWI)).
Three full camping-sized propane tanks were discovered in a carry-on bag at Oakland (OAK). Propane tanks are prohibited in both carry-on and checked baggage due to their propensity to explode.
Three full camping-sized propane tanks were discovered in a carry-on bag at Oakland (OAK). Propane tanks are prohibited in both carry-on and checked baggage due to their propensity to explode.
Ten vacuum sealed packages of marijuana were discovered in a checked bag at San Francisco (SFO).
Ten vacuum sealed packages of marijuana were discovered in a checked bag at San Francisco (SFO).
Counterclockwise From Top, Knives Discovered at: TUS, CLT, CLT, HNL, ORD, ORD, ORD, PHX, PVD, SFO, SFO, and SJC
Counterclockwise From Top, Knives Discovered at: TUS, CLT, CLT, HNL, ORD, ORD, ORD, PHX, PVD, SFO, SFO, and SJC

Clockwise From Top Left, Items Discovered at: MDW, AVP, and AUS
Clockwise From Top Left, Items Discovered at: MDW, AVP, and AUS
Zelda Sword Discovered at (OAK)
 Zelda Sword Discovered at (OAK)
Miscellaneous Prohibited Items – In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly, officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons and many other prohibited items too numerous to note.

Stun Guns - 16 stun guns were discovered in carry-on bags this week. Two were discovered at Dallas Love (DAL), and the others were found at Albuquerque (ABQ), Atlanta (ATL), Bradley (BDL), Lafayette (LFT), Las Vegas (LAS), Midway (MDW), New York LaGuardia (LGA), Oklahoma City (OKC), Portland (PWM), Reno (RNO), Seattle (SEA), Sitka (SIT), Springfield (SGF), and Wichita (ICT).

Ammunition – When packed properly, ammunition can be transported in your checked baggage, but it is never permissible to pack ammo in your carry-on bag.


Clockwise From Top Left, Firearms Discovered in Carry-on Bags at: ATL, HOU, SNA, and MEM
Clockwise From Top Left, Firearms Discovered in Carry-on Bags at: ATL, HOU, SNA, and MEM
Clockwise From Top Left, Firearms Discovered in Carry-on Bags at: TUL, BNA, GTF, and CID
Clockwise From Top Left, Firearms Discovered in Carry-on Bags at: TUL, BNA, GTF, and CID
Left - Right, Firearms Discovered in Carry-on Bags at OAK and IND
Left - Right, Firearms Discovered in Carry-on Bags at OAK and IND

40 Firearms Discovered This Week – Of the 40 firearms, 31 were loaded and 13 had rounds chambered.
*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates.

You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms. Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $11,000. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions; that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

Read our 2014 Year in Review post! If you haven’t read them yet, make sure you check out our year in review posts for 2011, 2012 and 2013.

Follow @TSABlogTeam on Twitter and Instagram!

Bob Burns
TSA Blog Team


If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact us by clicking here.

52 comments:

Anonymous said...

As always, absolutely nothing you needed your slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners to detect. Meanwhile, how many people suffered physical searches thanks to false alarms on these useless machines?

Why are Curtis Burns and West Cooper unwilling to address, let alone answer, that question?

How many weeks has it been since you last trumpeted something dangerous you found with the naked body scanners?

RB said...

Still doing illegal searches for drugs TSA?

Sexual Assault pat downs and no telling what other illegal acts are being committed by TSA.

Time for an outside investigation of the entire agency.

Anonymous said...

Why people question a body scan, when it is very apparent from the confiscated weapons, that this is a bigger issue then someone seeing their profile in an X-Ray.

Anonymous said...

Thank you TSA for keeping us safe. Do what ever you need to do to keep danger away from our flying.

good job!

Anonymous said...

I find it amusing that the same people post the sam comments every week. Just goes to show that copy/paste works for you. All I can say is try to find a flight crew that will even fly the plane without TSA doing their quality, security work!

@SkyWayManAz said...

RB if it is drugs TSA feels obligated to contact law enforcement immediately to see if a crime has occurred. I'm not going to say that is improper on their part even though it is hard to ignore some of their methods seem suspiciously aimed more at finding drugs than weapons. However if it is a screener sexually assaulting a passenger they don't feel obligated to contact law enforcement and will handle it internally. We're not supposed to notice the double standard that a crime has clearly occurred but TSA is acting to protect themselves and the perp by making it difficult to prosecute. We're not supposed to notice they may have violated the law by not immediately notifying authorities. Perhaps in that case they feel their federal position makes them the authority. Nothing to see here on conflict of interest I guess. Please step into the private screening room *honk!* *honk!*

Anonymous said...

We question naked body scans because they don't make us safer and subject us to sexual assault by TSA.

Anonymous said...

Nothing found at DEN? Must be too busy sexually assaulting innocent people...

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
Why people question a body scan, when it is very apparent from the confiscated weapons, that this is a bigger issue then someone seeing their profile in an X-Ray.

April 18, 2015 at 3:56 PM

-----------------------------------

Most, if not all, of the weapons are found with the metal detectors and x-ray machines that have been in use for decades. The TSA seldom finds weapons with the body scanners. As we saw this week in Denver, the body scanners were used to commit sexual assault. The TSA may say it was a couple of bad apples, but news reports are showing that it was a widespread problem. In addition hundreds of TSA workers have been caught doing inappropriate things ove the years.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
Thank you TSA for keeping us safe. Do what ever you need to do to keep danger away from our flying.

good job!

April 18, 2015 at 7:22 PM

-------------------------------

You should check out the blog post below. What the TSA workers did in Denver is sickening. I doubt Denver is the only place this activity was taking place. I fell that I am much more likely to get assaulted or robbed by the TSA than be harmed by a terrorist.

Anonymous said...

"Anonymous said...

Why people question a body scan, when it is very apparent from the confiscated weapons, that this is a bigger issue then someone seeing their profile in an X-Ray.

April 18, 2015 at 3:56 PM"

This make absolutely no sense at all. Are you trying to say that the scanners find weapons? If so, that would be wrong as the metal detector finds 99% of weapons. Further, the body scan does not show a profile.

screen shot

Anonymous said...

"Anonymous said...

Thank you TSA for keeping us safe. Do what ever you need to do to keep danger away from our flying.

good job!

April 18, 2015 at 7:22 PM"

TSA is not keeping you safe, but you can keep on thinking that they are doing so rather than doing some critical thinking about why the TSA is a hindrance rather than actually doing anything useful.

screen shot

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
I find it amusing that the same people post the sam comments every week. Just goes to show that copy/paste works for you. All I can say is try to find a flight crew that will even fly the plane without TSA doing their quality, security work!

April 19, 2015 at 8:48 AM
----------------------------------
wow. not just a river in Egypt. flight crews know as well as frequent travelers do that TSA's methods are not "quality", and don't provide "security". TSA misses at least 2 items for every one caught, and there are no attacks. TSA is 8 billion wasted dollars every year.

Anonymous said...

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense. now you're even allowing college kids (kaydets) to endure more reasonable screening, but those who served and sacrificed for 20+ have to take their bloody shoes and belts off!!

Anonymous said...

And how is TSA a hindrance to airplane security? What are they doing to make air travel unsafe? There is no factual basis to your statement "TSA is a hindrance rather than actually doing anything useful." You may not like their methods, but I think the statistics speak for themselves. I think you are extremely naïve if you think the bad guys are still not trying to find ways to make a statement.

Anonymous said...

12 years, not a single terror attack or attempted attack on a U.S. based flight.
Thanks TSA for your continued success.
As for the "bad apples", I have an idea. Pay and train TSA officers like the professionals we all expect them to be. Raise the hiring standards, pay them more than $15.00 an hour and make TSA a professional career job not a stepping stone or temporary job. Make it professional, require professionals and you will get professional results.

SSSS for Some Reason said...

Anonymous said...
Why people question a body scan, when it is very apparent from the confiscated weapons, that this is a bigger issue then someone seeing their profile in an X-Ray.

April 18, 2015 at 3:56 PM

~~~~~~~~

That is an interesting assertion.

The TSA advertises through this blog an average of about 40 firearms a week. There is an additional array of items found, knives, replica's that aren't dangerous to anyone except the most timid of individuals, some fireworks..... lets be generous and say 150 items per week on average.

There are about 5,000 airports in the US that have paved runways, I don't know how many of them have a TSA presence because apparently that number is SSI or some other designation the TSA cares not to share.

There are, on average, about 40 million passengers moving through the airports in any given week.

That would give you about 150 'finds' of the TSA keeping you safe per week compared to 40 million passengers. That works out to 0.00000375 percent of passengers getting caught with an item from the prohibited list. That means that either there are very few 'bad things' trying to get on an aircraft, of the TSA is really really bad at finding prohibited items. And the answer is actually both.

Here is another way of looking at it.....

Again, lets stick to the simple math of the TSA finding 150 prohibited items per week.

The TSA costs 8 billion dollars a year to operate. That works out to 153 million dollars per week. 150 items found per week works out to about a Million Dollars per find.

The TSA may be keeping us safe, at least you seem to think yourself safer. But at what cost for that safety?

RB said...

"Pocketknife Surrendered To TSA Found For Sale On eBay"

http://denver.cbslocal.com/2015/04/03/pocketknife-tsa-ebay/

TSA is apparently profiting on items "surrendered" (a TSA euphemism for stealing) at TSA checkpoints.

We recently learned that TSA keeps any cash money found or left at a TSA Checkpoint so what incentive is there for TSA to attempt getting something back to the rightful owner?

Do you trust the TSA?

Anonymous said...

The procurement requirements the TSA put out say otherwise. Have a look for yourself:

https://epic.org/open_gov/foia/TSA_Procurement_Specs.pdf

Some choice quotes:

"WBI shall allow exporting of image data in real-time"

"The WBI system shall provide capabilities for data transfers via USB devices. . ."

"The WBI System: (a) Shall possess an Ethernet network interface…"

"The WBI shall allow exporting of image data (raw and reconstructed."

"Enabling and disabling of image filtering shall be modifiable by users as defined in the User Access Levels and Capabilities appendix."

"The WBI System . . . (b)shall support full/half duplex data rates of 10/100 mega-bits per second to support future requirements. (c) Shall support Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Amazing, trying to prove you position with OLD DATA FROM 2008.

So once again: The machines that TSA uses right now have NEVER transmitted or stored anything! They simply cannot do that.

Chris Boyce said...

Have no fear, TSA. Mel's "apology" will be off the front page of the blog by Friday.

RB said...

http://www.startribune.com/lifestyle/travel/300715701.html

*****"TSA adding security measures, including more frequent background checks, for aviation workers"*****

"Johnson said airport and airline workers traveling as passengers will also have to go through TSA screening before boarding a flight. The number of access points to secure areas will be reduced to an "operational minimum," he said."

I seem to remember that the TSA Blog Team has insisted that all passengers go through TSA screening with the exception of some senior government types and law enforcement that are armed.

So why would DHS Secretary Johnson make such a statement? Has TSA been caught in yet another lie?

Comment TSA Blog Team?


Anonymous said...

Repeatedly referring to them as naked body scanners does not make it so. Unless you look like a computer Gumby avatar there is nothing "naked" about them and there hasn't been for at least 8 years. But then TSA haters don't want facts or information that will conflict with their preconceived notions. They want to keep posting the same childish accusations week after week. Grow up.

GSOLTSO said...

RB sez - "So why would DHS Secretary Johnson make such a statement? Has TSA been caught in yet another lie?"

The regulation for flying has been the exact same since I got here over 10 years ago - TSA employees and airport employees undergo the same screening as all other passengers (whether that is standard or Precheck would depend on the individual). I have no idea what spurred that comment, or the context in which it was given, but that rule has been the same for at least 10+ years.

West
TSA blog Team

RB said...

GSOLTSO said...
RB sez - "So why would DHS Secretary Johnson make such a statement? Has TSA been caught in yet another lie?"

The regulation for flying has been the exact same since I got here over 10 years ago - TSA employees and airport employees undergo the same screening as all other passengers (whether that is standard or Precheck would depend on the individual). I have no idea what spurred that comment, or the context in which it was given, but that rule has been the same for at least 10+ years.

West
TSA blog Team

April 22, 2015 at 8:02 AM

************************
Are you suggesting that Jeh Johnson, Secretary of DHS, is poorly informed or just doesn't know what he is talking about?

Seems more likely that the public has been misinformed by employees of the TSA.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
I find it amusing that the same people post the sam comments every week. Just goes to show that copy/paste works for you. All I can say is try to find a flight crew that will even fly the plane without TSA doing their quality, security work!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I can name you an entire airlines worth of people that would like to fly without the TSA.

Anonymous said...

That is an interesting assertion.

The TSA advertises through this blog an average of about 40 firearms a week. There is an additional array of items found, knives, replica's that aren't dangerous to anyone except the most timid of individuals, some fireworks..... lets be generous and say 150 items per week on average.

There are about 5,000 airports in the US that have paved runways, I don't know how many of them have a TSA presence because apparently that number is SSI or some other designation the TSA cares not to share.

There are, on average, about 40 million passengers moving through the airports in any given week.

That would give you about 150 'finds' of the TSA keeping you safe per week compared to 40 million passengers. That works out to 0.00000375 percent of passengers getting caught with an item from the prohibited list. That means that either there are very few 'bad things' trying to get on an aircraft, of the TSA is really really bad at finding prohibited items. And the answer is actually both.

Here is another way of looking at it.....

Again, lets stick to the simple math of the TSA finding 150 prohibited items per week.

The TSA costs 8 billion dollars a year to operate. That works out to 153 million dollars per week. 150 items found per week works out to about a Million Dollars per find.

The TSA may be keeping us safe, at least you seem to think yourself safer. But at what cost for that safety?
WOW. Do you make this up as you go? There are only about 18 million people who fly weekly, not 40 million. TSA is only at about 450 airports. 5000? You think only 150 prohibited items are found weekly? I bet LAX and other large airport find that many a day.

Anonymous said...

"Pocketknife Surrendered To TSA Found For Sale On eBay"

http://denver.cbslocal.com/2015/04/03/pocketknife-tsa-ebay/

TSA is apparently profiting on items "surrendered" (a TSA euphemism for stealing) at TSA checkpoints.

We recently learned that TSA keeps any cash money found or left at a TSA Checkpoint so what incentive is there for TSA to attempt getting something back to the rightful owner?

Do you trust the TSA?

"The journey his pocketknife took was most likely legitimate. According to the TSA, when passengers surrender items at security they become voluntarily abandoned property.

Many such knives are turned over to the General Services Administration, or GSA. A GSA spokesperson said the items are divided up into lots in bulk and eventually placed up for auction. Someone likely purchased Gursin’s pocketknife there and then put it up for another auction on eBay."

you conveniently left this part of the story out, and the part where GSA auctions the items off, not TSA. I seen nothing to indicate TSA did naything wrong. Ill take a black helicopter please

SSSS for Some Reason said...

Anonymous said...
Repeatedly referring to them as naked body scanners does not make it so.

And repeatedly denying it does not do anything either.

Unless you look like a computer Gumby avatar there is nothing "naked" about them

The machine has to see under our clothes first to see if something is 'out of programming' in order to put the dot on the gumby figure. Looking under or through clothing to the skin is the very definition of naked scanner.

and there hasn't been for at least 8 years.

Not true. The machines, by your very own posts and very own words are the exact definition of a naked scanner. That you choose to disbelieve does not change the facts of what the machines do or how.


But then TSA haters don't want facts or information

Provide some facts or valid information and we'll see who wants what.

that will conflict with their preconceived notions.

Says the poster who is convinced the machines aren't what they are and tries to spin and twist each and every single word to support his own preconceived notion.


They want to keep posting the same childish accusations week after week. Grow up.

Interesting that you would consider adults thinking critically about a process and a system and questioning the flaws in it as 'childish.' Even more interesting that the person using that accusation is acting like the very child he accuses other of being while stamping their feet and saying nuh-unh to anything he disagrees with.

You aren't obligated to read any of these comments. You can skip over the comments you disagree with. The fact that you don't makes it very clear that you work for the TSA and have access to the back-end of this system. Your style of writing is obvious so even as an Anonymous it is readily apparent when it is you. And your posts tend to go live much sooner than anyone else's, and you have on occasion responded to comments out of order further proving you have access to the back-end.

You can be the TSA Cheerleader all you want. The rest of us understand one simple fact.... when you are intellectually secure in your opinion and have facts to support your point of view you don't try and shut down others or demean the opposing side with name calling and insults.

Susan Richart said...

"So once again: The machines that TSA uses right now have NEVER transmitted or stored anything! They simply cannot do that.

April 20, 2015 at 7:24 PM"

"Eliminates the review of images as data is privately processed by software without human intervention to determine if any threats are present."

The above from ProVision ATD "specs."

You will note that the above does NOT say "Eliminates images" but rather says "Eliminates the review of images......."

The images are still there as much as you don't want to believe it.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Anonymous said...

And these are just the weapons they actually catch. We'll never know how many get through security. Since you can never stop all the weapons getting through, wouldn't it make more sense to just issue weapons to everyone on the plane? Evens the playing field for all and is the same net effect as no one being armed, which we all know is impossible to guarantee.

Anonymous said...

Posted:
RB said...
"Pocketknife Surrendered To TSA Found For Sale On eBay"

http://denver.cbslocal.com/2015/04/03/pocketknife-tsa-ebay/

TSA is apparently profiting on items "surrendered" (a TSA euphemism for stealing) at TSA checkpoints.

We recently learned that TSA keeps any cash money found or left at a TSA Checkpoint so what incentive is there for TSA to attempt getting something back to the rightful owner?

Do you trust the TSA?


April 20, 2015 at 2:58 PM
-----------------------------
Man RB, are you stretching.
As has been cited on here before, TSA has a CONTRACT with outside vendors to pick up and destroy/sell/recycle/whatever items that are surrendered. TSA PAYS FOR this service. Thus TSA actually has an incentive NOT to collect surrendered items as TSA is charged by weight to have these items picked up. What the contractor does with them afterwards is thier business. So this procedure is actually OPPOSITE what you are stating.

Of course, this was clearly spelled out for you in September of 2009 on this very site. I know you read it, you've been here every day since and before then.

See Monday, September 21, 2009

As for the cash, you need to speak to congress about that as they have mandated where it goes.

PS - I used all capitals as you seem to have a problem reading things that have been posted prior in standard size lettering.

Anonymous said...

"I find it amusing that the same people post the sam comments every week."

Do you also find it amusing that Curtis Burns and West Cooper refuse to answer the same completely legitimate questions every week?

SSSS for Some Reason said...

Anonymous said...
WOW. Do you make this up as you go? There are only about 18 million people who fly weekly, not 40 million.

You are correct. WORLDWIDE there are about 40 million weekly. I did the math wrong.

18 Million passengers, on average, through US airports on a weekly basis. That changes the math to the
'find per passenger' score to some smaller fraction of a fraction of a fraction of a fraction of one percent.

That still doesn't change the math of the cost per find because the TSA budget is not connected to the number of passengers screened.


TSA is only at about 450 airports. 5000?

So TSA only 'protects' about ten percent of the paved runways in america? Doesn't that WEAKEN the cause of the TSA? With so many airports unsecured by the TSA and still no terrorist attacks involving aircraft... it would seem the TSA is guarding us from something that is very incredibly rare to begin with.

You think only 150 prohibited items are found weekly? I bet LAX and other large airport find that many a day.

I just go by what these blotter posts list. If the TSA is finding more items of note it isn't my fault they aren't making the information available.

Anonymous said...

"Eliminates the review of images as data is privately processed by software without human intervention to determine if any threats are present."

The above from ProVision ATD "specs."

You will note that the above does NOT say "Eliminates images" but rather says "Eliminates the review of images......."

The images are still there as much as you don't want to believe it.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
O really now, you seem to have left out the line that states this.
Preserving Privacy
Automatic target detection (ATD) technology ensures passenger privacy by highlighting threats and anomalies using a generic mannequin that resembles a human outline. No images are generated.

Doober said...

Anonymous wrote:

"Preserving Privacy
Automatic target detection (ATD) technology ensures passenger privacy by highlighting threats and anomalies using a generic mannequin that resembles a human outline. No images are generated."

From EPIC:

"In response to mounting public criticism about the passenger screening program, the TSA recently announced that it would use "Automatic Target Recognition" software to mask the nude images of airline travelers that TSA officials currently view. However, documents obtained by EPIC in an earlier Freedom of Information Act lawsuit established that these procedures have the capability to store and record unfiltered images of passengers."

You don't seem to want to understand that an image is still generated. Your "proof" above is proof only of the fact that you are unable to comprehend and parse what is written.

copy made of this comment

GSOLTSO said...

RB sez - "Still doing illegal searches for drugs TSA?"

As explained many times previously, TSA does not search for drugs - however, if they are discovered while trying to screen a bag for a possible threat item, it is reported to local LEOs.

Anon sez - "Thank you TSA for keeping us safe."

We try our best Anon, thank you for the kind words.

Anon sez - "12 years, not a single terror attack or attempted attack on a U.S. based flight.
Thanks TSA for your continued success."

Thanks!

RB sez - "Are you suggesting that Jeh Johnson, Secretary of DHS, is poorly informed or just doesn't know what he is talking about?"

I am suggesting nothing more than the fact that the rule has been the same for 10+ years - minimium.

SSSS quoted and responded - "TSA is only at about 450 airports. 5000?

So TSA only 'protects' about ten percent of the paved runways in america? Doesn't that WEAKEN the cause of the TSA? With so many airports unsecured by the TSA and still no terrorist attacks involving aircraft... it would seem the TSA is guarding us from something that is very incredibly rare to begin with."

Just one point to interject in this discussion - the overwhelming majority of the paved runways not operated by TSA are General Aviation, Cargo or Military. Based upon the statistics found in this PDF indicate there are actually over 19000 landing sites (including helipads) nationwide - and GA is responsible for over 75% of the air traffic over the US - not much (or any for the most part) in the way of mass transit aviation at many of those locations.

West
TSA Blog Team

RB said...

GSOLTSO said...

RB sez - "Are you suggesting that Jeh Johnson, Secretary of DHS, is poorly informed or just doesn't know what he is talking about?"
***********************

I am suggesting nothing more than the fact that the rule has been the same for 10+ years - minimium.
****************
West, I agree that you are providing information as you understand it. But that information clearly conflicts with the most senior employee of DHS, a person who has far greater information resources than a second from the bottom level TSA employee.

Everthing Jeh Johnson releases to the public has been staffed and carefully prepared for public dissemination.

If you were on my side of the fence who would you believe from these two sources?

S said...

GSOLTSO said...
SSSS quoted and responded - "TSA is only at about 450 airports. 5000?

So TSA only 'protects' about ten percent of the paved runways in america? Doesn't that WEAKEN the cause of the TSA? With so many airports unsecured by the TSA and still no terrorist attacks involving aircraft... it would seem the TSA is guarding us from something that is very incredibly rare to begin with."

Just one point to interject in this discussion - the overwhelming majority of the paved runways not operated by TSA are General Aviation, Cargo or Military. Based upon the statistics found in this PDF indicate there are actually over 19000 landing sites (including helipads) nationwide - and GA is responsible for over 75% of the air traffic over the US - not much (or any for the most part) in the way of mass transit aviation at many of those locations.

West
TSA Blog Team


~~~~~~~~~

Thank you West, but that doesn't close the GIANT hole in your security plan. The fact that you consider those runways as not worthy of protection because they are 'only general aviation' is a HUGE problem.

Your entire security plan seem to be, as has been pointed out before, to save us from the last threat. Terrorists took control of commercial jets and used them as missiles so you 'protect' large airports with commercial jets.

But then you don't protect 'general aviation' runways where a terrorist could get something like a large gulfstream jet, pack it full of explosives, and then use it as a missile.

I'm not even one of the bad guys and I can see a dozen or more ways to get around you and your so-called security and do all kinds of damage to the country.

And if I am not one of the bad guys and I can see a dozen different methods of getting around you then just imagine what a real bad guy could do! Now imaging a team of 19 of them......

The fact that we don't have airplanes raining out of the skies just proves the point there are surprisingly few terrorists trying to use commercial aviation at any level as the vector for their terror attacks.

And that weakens the case for having the TSA even more because all the countries that don't benefit from your several layers of security don't have aircraft raining out of their skies either.

RB said...

GSOLTSO said...
RB sez - "Still doing illegal searches for drugs TSA?"

As explained many times previously, TSA does not search for drugs - however, if they are discovered while trying to screen a bag for a possible threat item, it is reported to local LEOs.
.................................

What assurance is there that the TSA screener was actually searching for dangerous things and not conducting an illegal search for drugs?

We already know that TSA employees are often criminals themselves so we have no reason to trust statements to that claim TSA screeners only do lawful things.

If the only thing being found in such a search is drugs then it's pretty clear that is what the screener was going for.

And even if it was a legal search are drug finds really what needs to be posted on this blog? They certainly don't pose any great threat to the safe conduct of any given flight.



Anonymous said...

Bob has again reused a photo from a previous week.The TSA cannot claim to find the exact same weapon two weeks in a row.

Stop lying, TSA!!

Anonymous said...

West, Bob has again reused a weapon photo from a previous week. Is this intentional?

The TSA's statistics cannot be trusted when it falsifies "evidence" as part of its propaganda campaign.

Anonymous said...

"Anonymous said...
Bob has again reused a photo from a previous week.The TSA cannot claim to find the exact same weapon two weeks in a row.

Stop lying, TSA!!

April 30, 2015 at 7:28 PM

Anonymous said...
West, Bob has again reused a weapon photo from a previous week. Is this intentional?

The TSA's statistics cannot be trusted when it falsifies "evidence" as part of its propaganda campaign.

May 2, 2015 at 5:51 AM"
----------------------------
And once again.....
At no point did ANYONE state the photos of the weapons are the actual photos taken of that specific weapon at the time it was found. Sometimes the PD does not allow TSA to photograph prohibited items. Once PD takes over, the weapon is in their custody. And due to chain of custody they sometimes prevent TSA from getting near it again.
It's not some great conspiracy when a picture is used to illustrate an example of a weapon that was found at the checkpoint. It does not mean that a .44 Magnum was not found. It just means a photo of the specific one found was unavailable. Unless Bob specifically states "This is a photo of the exact weapon that was found on this date at this checkpoint" it's not a lie. Its an illustration of the weapon that was found.
Maybe thats too simple for the conspiracy theorists out there. Maybe Bob needs to put a disclaimer up that states "Statistics on found weapons are accurate - Photos may be illustrative and not be of the actual weapon found."
Would that make you happy?

SSSS for Some Reason said...

"...And once again.....
At no point did ANYONE state the photos of the weapons are the actual photos taken of that specific weapon at the time it was found."

Then why post the picture at all?

Sometimes the PD does not allow TSA to photograph prohibited items.

And sometimes the photos are taken with a TSA marking in the background. If sometimes the PD doesn't let the TSA take photos then there isn't any really any need to post a photo, is there?

It's not some great conspiracy when a picture is used to illustrate an example of a weapon that was found at the checkpoint.

Some Great Conspiracy? No.

Misleading? Yes.

Propaganda tactic? Definitely!

We all know what a gun looks like, so using a picture of a gun to demonstrate that you found a gun just makes the travelling public distrust you even more. If you can't even get something as simple as a picture of gun correct how can we trust you to get anything more complex done correctly?


It just means a photo of the specific one found was unavailable.

If you don't have a picture of the item found then don't post a picture. You already list forty something guns found but you don't show forty something photos. If you don't have a photo, don't post a photo.

As to making us happy.... being more honest about what you do will make us happy. Trying to scare us by showing pictures of guns when they weren't the guns you found, or posting pictures of the last gun you found trying to claim you found one just like it.... you already have a failing public image and this kind of crap just makes it worse.

Stop TSA Lies said...

TSA Anonymous said...

And once again.....
At no point did ANYONE state the photos of the weapons are the actual photos taken of that specific weapon at the time it was found. Sometimes the PD does not allow TSA to photograph prohibited items. Once PD takes over, the weapon is in their custody. And due to chain of custody they sometimes prevent TSA from getting near it again.
It's not some great conspiracy when a picture is used to illustrate an example of a weapon that was found at the checkpoint. It does not mean that a .44 Magnum was not found. It just means a photo of the specific one found was unavailable. Unless Bob specifically states "This is a photo of the exact weapon that was found on this date at this checkpoint" it's not a lie. Its an illustration of the weapon that was found.
Maybe thats too simple for the conspiracy theorists out there. Maybe Bob needs to put a disclaimer up that states "Statistics on found weapons are accurate - Photos may be illustrative and not be of the actual weapon found."
Would that make you happy?

May 4, 2015 at 3:10 PM


The photo file titles are all "sfo.jpg," "lax.jpg," etc.

The photos are clearly placed in a WEEKLY UPDATE that claims "X Firearms Discovered This Week," with photo captions such as "Firearms Discovered in Carry-on Bags at OAK and IND."

The photos appear to change in each week's blog, and the typical blog visitor would not notice the reused photos.

The blog states, "In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates."

These are the facts:

- Photos are labeled to be from specific airports.

- Multiple, different photos are placed in a weekly post listing the weapons found that week.

- The blog states the data it provides is accurate, with some variation due to airport report timing.


Are you saying, TSAnonymous, that a reasonable citizen of this country would not believe that the photos displayed in the weekly blog post were of weapons actually found at the listed airports during that week?

It is clear that this blog's writers and management are trying to deceive the American public, and have done so for years. I could have believed Bob was just so bad at file management that he called every photo from Atlanta "atl.jpg," but you've made it clear that Bob picks whatever photo he wants to use, renames it "atl.jpg," and posts it to the weekly finds blog post, whether or not that photo was taken in Atlanta during that week, month, year.

Since you are speaking for the TSA Blog, answer the following questions:

1. What is your name?
2. What TSA division/group do you work for?
3. How long have you worked on this blog?
4. What other lies or deceptions have you perpetrated on the American public?

Stand up and be proud of your sad, desperate claim, "We never said we wouldn't lie to you!"

Photo Finish said...

A TSAnonymous commenter said on Dec 5, 2014, "I see nothing that states "This is an actual photo of the weapon we are talking about in this post."
The pics are illustrations of weapons. In many cases they are stock photos.
"

West (GSOLTSO) Cooper said on Dec 16, 2014, "I am not aware of reusing photos, except in the case of file photos for specific types of posts (like the Xmas postings, the travel advisements and such. There may have been some photos reused in an end of year review post and the like. If a photo was reused in weekly posts, then it was most likely an oversight. As far as stats, the Blog Team have nothing to do with the compilation and distribution of statistical data - well, that is not entirely true, we publish the information to the general public here from time to time, but we do not compile or collate it."



The same TSAnonymous commenter said on May 4, 2015, "At no point did ANYONE state the photos of the weapons are the actual photos taken of that specific weapon at the time it was found..."

West - is this TSAnonymous employee's comments correct? If not, why are these comments approved, but no follow up with true information provided by you or another blog moderator? Do you know who this TSAnonymous employee is? Did you approve his/her comments? Does this TSAnonymous employee approve his/her own comments?

GSOLTSO said...

Stop TSA sez - "Since you are speaking for the TSA Blog, answer the following questions:"

None of the anonymous accounts, or even named accounts (other than the ones identified by TSA previous to this) speak for TSA in an official capacity. The comments are approved from anonymous commenters the same as named/identified commenters. Some folks here make wild claims about things that TSA does, some give specific information about personal experiences, some taike a guess at what is going on, and some print off crazy things that may apply and throw darts to see what they are going to post this week - all of which are approved regardless of handle/title/name.

West
TSA Blog Team

GSOLTSO said...

Photo Finish says - "West - is this TSAnonymous employee's comments correct? If not, why are these comments approved, but no follow up with true information provided by you or another blog moderator? Do you know who this TSAnonymous employee is? Did you approve his/her comments? Does this TSAnonymous employee approve his/her own comments?"

See the above comment from me please.

Add that none of the anonymous folks approve themselves, only blog team members and certain HQ elements approve comments.

West
TSA Blog Team

Bob Burns (TSA Blog Team) said...

Good morning. I only post pictures of the actual items and do not dig from the archives to find photos.

Let me know what photos you're referring to, and I can either refute or explain what you're seeing.

Thanks,

Bob Burns - TSA Blog Team

RB said...

GSOLTSO said...
Photo Finish says - "West - is this TSAnonymous employee's comments correct? If not, why are these comments approved, but no follow up with true information provided by you or another blog moderator? Do you know who this TSAnonymous employee is? Did you approve his/her comments? Does this TSAnonymous employee approve his/her own comments?"

See the above comment from me please.

Add that none of the anonymous folks approve themselves, only blog team members and certain HQ elements approve comments.

West
TSA Blog Team

May 6, 2015 at 7:56 AM

...............
What certain HQ elements are approving TSA Blog comments?

Why are they not disclosed in the "Meet the Bloggers" sidebar?

RB said...

Bob Burns (TSA Blog Team) said...
Good morning. I only post pictures of the actual items and do not dig from the archives to find photos.

Let me know what photos you're referring to, and I can either refute or explain what you're seeing.

Thanks,

Bob Burns - TSA Blog Team

May 6, 2015 at 10:43 AM
.................
Out of all the questions asked and comments posted this is the only one that gets a response from Blogger Bob.

Makes one wonder where the priorities of the TSA Blog Team lie.

Wintermute said...

Bob Burns (TSA Blog Team)May 6, 2015 at 10:43 AM
Good morning. I only post pictures of the actual items and do not dig from the archives to find photos.

Let me know what photos you're referring to, and I can either refute or explain what you're seeing.

Thanks,

Bob Burns - TSA Blog Team


The specific duplicates have been pointed out in previous comments, and you've remained silent thus far. Why the sudden interest in the specifics, when they've already been mentioned?

Also, looks like our bold blogger intern was wrong on this point. What else has (s)he been wrong on?

Finish the Photo Lies said...

West and Bob,

So you are saying that ONLY

West Cooper
Curtis "Bob" Burns
Lynn Dean

and some mysterious "HQ Elements" have access to this blog as a writer, moderator, or anything more than a commenter?

Are any of these "HQ Elements" commenting anonymously and approving/deleting comments?

If you see someone claiming to be a TSAnonymous making false statements such as we've pointed out repeatedly, why are these comments approved? Why are you not following up these comments with your version of the truth?

I appreciate you two finally making an attempt to reply to our questions. Bob, you know you can use the Google search on the right side of this blog? The key terms that produce the best results are reuse and photos.

I don't mind telling you this because even if you unethically change these blog posts without publicly noting the changes, there are several of us who already made screenshots.