Friday, March 6, 2015

TSA Week in Review: 51 Loaded Firearms and a Chihuahua in a Checked Bag





Loaded firearm discovered in a carry-on bag at Memphis (MEM).
Loaded firearm discovered in a carry-on bag at Memphis (MEM).
55 Firearms Discovered This Week Of the 55 firearms, 51 were loaded and 13 had rounds chambered. 

Stun Guns - 13 stun guns were discovered in carry-on bags this week. Two were discovered at Dallas Love (DAL), and the remainder were discovered at Atlanta (ATL), Charlottesville (CHO), Denver (DEN), Huntsville (HSV), Las Vegas (LAS), Orlando (MCO), Redman (RDM), Reno (RNO), Richmond (RIC), San Diego (SAN), and San Francisco (SFO).

Miscellaneous Prohibited Items In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly, officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons and many other prohibited items too numerous to note. 



Ammunition discovered in a carry-on bag at Oklahoma City (OKC).
Ammunition discovered in a carry-on bag at Oklahoma City (OKC).

Ammunition – When packed properly, ammunition can be transported in your checked baggage, but it is never permissible to pack ammo in your carry-on bag.

TSA officers have discovered firearms at security checkpoints in 41 of 50 states so far this year.
TSA officers have discovered firearms at security checkpoints in 41 of 50 states so far this year.
Clockwise from top left, firearms discovered in carry on bags at: TPA, MCI, TRI, IND, ATL & LYH
Clockwise from top left, firearms discovered in carry on bags at: TPA, MCI, TRI, IND, ATL & LYH

Clockwise from top left, firearms discovered in carry on bags at: GSO, CRP, BNA, SFB, OKC, DEN, FAY & SAT
Clockwise from top left, firearms discovered in carry on bags at: GSO, CRP, BNA, SFB, OKC, DEN, FAY & SAT
55 Firearms Discovered This Week – Of the 55 firearms, 51 were loaded and 13 had rounds chambered.
*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates. 

You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms. Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure. 

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $7,500. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions; that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items. 

Read our 2014 Year in Review post! If you haven’t read them yet, make sure you check out our year in review posts for 2011, 2012 and 2013.  

Follow @TSABlogTeam on Twitter and Instagram! 

Bob Burns
TSA Blog Team 

If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact us by clicking here.

44 comments:

Anonymous said...

51 firearms AND a dog in one bag? Thank goodness it was a tiny dog!

Anonymous said...

If the penalties were MUCH stiffer we could get this nonsense to end.

Anonymous said...


As always, absolutely nothing you needed your slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners to detect. Meanwhile, how many people suffered physical searches thanks to false alarms on these useless machines?

Why are Curtis Burns and West Cooper unwilling to address, let alone answer, that question?

How many weeks has it been since you last trumpeted something dangerous you found with the naked body scanners?

RB said...

Will TSA assess a fine against the dog for being artfully concealed?

SSSS for Some Reason said...

"...TSA officers have discovered firearms at security checkpoints in 41 of 50 states so far this year."

First, you are Agents, not Officers.

Second, So? Last time I looked owning a firearm was legal in all 50 States.

Third, and lastly... Big deal. You found some stuff that is on your list of things to find. You did your job. Why are you bragging so much about doing the absolute minimum part of your job?

LB Monteros said...

I'll bet that was one happy puppy dog! Not a happy thing to imagine what would have happened if it hadn't been found.

sac du phong romoss said...

Will TSA assess a fine against the dog for being artfully concealed?

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
If the penalties were MUCH stiffer we could get this nonsense to end.

Agreed!

We should start fining the TSA when they incorrectly asses something as a threat and voluntarily surrender it from a passenger.

wahyudi said...

nice gun :)

Anonymous said...

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense. now you're even allowing college kids (kaydets) to endure more reasonable screening, but those who sacrificed for 20+ have to take their bloody shoes and belts off!! it's pretty clear that TSA doesn't understand risk assessment or risk-based anything, much less security.

Anonymous said...


TSA – Format change to blog 6 March, creating viewing issues US Government
For US Air Force and DoD computers the change today in your photos i.e. link to Instagram, 2 links in the 6 Mar issue prevents viewing. DoD computers cannot link to Instagram for security reasons, please go back to the previous way you displayed graphics like the past issues.
Change may be good but not for DoD users and many others.
Mr McLemore, USAF

Anonymous said...

SSSS for Some Reason said...
"...TSA officers have discovered firearms at security checkpoints in 41 of 50 states so far this year."

First, you are Agents, not Officers.

wrong. TSA officers are just that. They are sworn officers as defined by federal staute. They ( those screening your bags and persons) are however NOT law enforcment officers allthough TSA does have some law enforment officers as well.

Susan Richart said...

Our Mensa genius wrote:

"TSA officers are just that"

The truth is this:

"For the first four years of its existence, the TSA did not call its screeners “officers,” nor did it dress them as such.

But in 2005, in an effort to professionalize the force and boost morale, the TSA reclassified screeners as “transportation security officers.” In 2007, the agency issued screeners uniforms with blue shirts, and the following year, it replaced the embroidered logos with metal badges.

The result, critics say, is a work force of more than 45,000 people who hold the job of “officer” in name only."

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

RB said...

Anonymous said...
SSSS for Some Reason said...
"...TSA officers have discovered firearms at security checkpoints in 41 of 50 states so far this year."

First, you are Agents, not Officers.

wrong. TSA officers are just that. They are sworn officers as defined by federal staute. They ( those screening your bags and persons) are however NOT law enforcment officers allthough TSA does have some law enforment officers as well.

March 9, 2015 at 12:23 PM

........................

Wrong Bold Blotter Blogger.

A Sworn Officer is an officer of the law with arrest powers which rules out your typical airport screener.

Now you claim to have a federal statue so why don't you share that reference so we can all see what you are relying on.

Anonymous said...

SSSS said, " Last time I looked owning a firearm was legal in all 50 States."

And.....it's illegal to carry into a security checkpoint... Next.

Anonymous said...

I think you are ignorant of TSA procedures and read too many self-styles TSA experts' versions. Your command of the language falls short of even kindergarten standard. Kindly read the official TSA website and NOT the confused versions.

SSSS for Some Reason said...

"...wrong. TSA officers are just that."

Nope.

Agents. Each and every one of them.

Anonymous said...

Why does this blog continue to censor posts that comply with comment policy?

Ruben said...

It’s quite worrying to see the amount of weapons that are caught!

Alexandru said...

why would you want to take with you a firearm in baggage?? it's logical that you will be caught

Anonymous said...

SSSS for Some Reason said...
"...wrong. TSA officers are just that."

Nope.

Agents. Each and every one of them.

well, you can call them what ever you wish, but it does not make it so. They are in fact Swaorn Federal Officers, each and every one of them. You may not like it or agree with it. But it is what it is. You can look at their title, Transportation Security OFFICER, their badge says U.S. OFFICER. When TSA started, all officers were legally classified as "screeners." In 2005, TSA lagally reclassified them as "officers."
Like it or not, it is what it is.

SSSS for Some Reason said...

"...Ruben said...
It’s quite worrying to see the amount of weapons that are caught!"

Why?

Over a million passengers a week are screened and only forty to fifty ish firearms are found, and maybe that many other 'things' from the prohibited list. Why would you worry about something that represents something like 0.0002% of the number of persons in the airport on any given week?

And even with that 'worriesome' percentage of bad things being found, not one single bad thing has happened in the air in a very long time so even those very few people with bad things who may, or may not, be bad people themselves they obviously had no desire to cause mayhem on, or in, or with, an aircraft.

RB said...

When will TSA comply with all aspects of the Administrative Procedures Act in regards to deploying Whole Body Imagers?

Susan Richart said...

Our resident genius wrote: "They are sworn officers as defined by federal staute."

I would ask that you read this and then tell us where that "federal staute" (sic) is found that defines a sworn officer.

http://www.911jobforums.com/f58/federal-definition-sworn-60602/

All Federal employees swear or affirm essentially the same oath, whether they are TSA screeners or clerks at the Social Security Administration.

“I, AB, do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter. So help me God.”

The oath itself is codified in 5 U.S. Code 3331.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Susan Richart said...

Mr. Mensa, it's officer in name only. As I mentioned in a comment that hasn't been posted yet, you take the same oath as almost every other federal employee, except the President, judges and military, takes. There is nothing special in the oath that you take that makes you an "officer."

The change from "screener" to "officer" was made in an attempt to make you feel better about your jobs. IOW, it was a psychological move. Sadly, it has, for many of you, done nothing but give you an inflated sense of your mundane position.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

SSSS for Some Reason said...

"....well, you can call them what ever you wish, but it does not make it so. "

Exactly!

They are Agents.

You can call them officers if you like, but a blue uniform and tin badge doesn't make them so.

Anonymous said...

RB said, "When will TSA comply with all aspects of the Administrative Procedures Act in regards to deploying Whole Body Imagers?"

Settle down kiddo. TSA will do as they see fit.

Anonymous said...

Susan Richart said...
Mr. Mensa, it's officer in name only. As I mentioned in a comment that hasn't been posted yet, you take the same oath as almost every other federal employee, except the President, judges and military, takes. There is nothing special in the oath that you take that makes you an "officer."

interesting that you would know what oath they take...disgrunteled current or ex TSA Officer perhaps? "you?" Who are you talking about?

RB said...

Anonymous said...
RB said, "When will TSA comply with all aspects of the Administrative Procedures Act in regards to deploying Whole Body Imagers?"

Settle down kiddo. TSA will do as they see fit.

March 14, 2015 at 4:07 AM

...................
Apparently TSA sees fit to violate the legally mandated rules and regulations of the Administrative Procedures Act.

If TSA isn't willing to follow the laws of our nation then why should citizens put any trust in TSA to do anything lawfully?

Susan Richart said...

Mensa wrote, in response to a comment I made,

"interesting that you would know what oath they take...disgrunteled current or ex TSA Officer perhaps? "you?" Who are you talking about?

March 16, 2015 at 8:13 AM"

Use your superior intellect to do an internet search, it's not difficult.

As you seem to have so much definitive information on the TSA, it is not presumptuous of me to believe you are one of them.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Anonymous said...

Why is former TSO Susan R. so concerned about job titles now that she no longer can work for TSA?!?

TSOs are Officers of the Federal Government. It's not difficult.

SSSS for Some Reason said...

RB Said.... "why should citizens put any trust in TSA to do anything lawfully? "

I don't know about anyone else but I have never put any trust in the TSA. It has been a Kabuki of Security since Day 1.

Anonymous said...

If TSA isn't willing to follow the laws of our nation then why should citizens put any trust in TSA to do anything lawfully?

Interesting comment. Which laws are they breaking and how?

Wintermute said...

Anonymous said...

"Interesting comment. Which laws are they breaking and how?"

Off the top of my head, the 1st and 4th amendments of the Constitution of the United States of America, as well as the Administrative Procedures Act. First, several comments that do NOT violate posting guidelines have never seen the light of day, violating Free Speech provisions of the 1st Amendment. Second, the naked body scanners exceed the narrow exceptions carved out for administrative searches. Finally, TSA routinely deploys procedures with out the required comment period, ignores court orders regarding said comment periods, then ignores comments once they finally do hold the comment period.

I'm sure they are violating other laws as well (illegally detaining travellers, when the TSA has no powers to detain, for one), but those are off the top of my head.

Anonymous said...

They are called officers in their ranks but I agree they are not law enforcment officers.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
They are called officers in their ranks but I agree they are not law enforcment officers.

They aren't Officers at all.

They may call each other Officer.

They may have the title of Officer.

But they aren't.

Wintermute said...

Anonymous said...
"They are called officers in their ranks but I agree they are not law enforcment officers."

In other words, they are officers in title only. Thanks for that acknowledgement ;)

Anonymous said...

Why are critics offended by the term Officer? It beats your title............."unemployed."

Wintermute said...

Anonymous Anonymous said...
Why are critics offended by the term Officer? It beats your title............."unemployed."

So, someone critical of TSA's use of the word "Officer" MUST be unemployed? Thanks for clarifying that you can't make a valid argument by stooping to such levels.

SSSS for Some Reason said...

Anonymous said...
Why are critics offended by the term Officer? It beats your title............."unemployed."

Conduct unbecoming an "Officer."

Besides, aren't personal attacks one of the prohibited items on the list? Or is the TSA promoting one set of rules for themselves and a different set of rules and standards for everyone else?

Anonymous said...

West, why was the personal attack by Anon on March 9, 9:28pm allowed. This clearly violates blog policy.

Anonymous said...

West, why are you allowing comments such as TSAnonymous of March 14, 4:07am?

He demeans a private citizen by calling him "kiddo," then clearly says the TSA does not answer to the American people nor their duly elected representatives. The TSA had no right nor authority to "do as they see fit" against the will and the word of the American public.

To the TSAnonymous: Shame on you.

Anonymous said...

West, why was this comment, which clearly violates blog policy allowed through moderation?

Anonymous said...

West, why aren't you replying to the questions posed in the last few approved comments?