Tuesday, March 24, 2015

TSA Pre✓® Reaches Milestone With More Than 1 Million Travelers Enrolled



Female hiker in the mountains. "Be there at your best. TSAprecheck
The TSA Pre✓® application program has reached a new milestone with more than 1 million travelers enrolled! Now at more than 330 application centers nationwide, including locations at 31 airports, it is easier than ever to apply for expedited screening.

Operating since October 2011, TSA Pre✓® is an expedited screening program that enables low-risk travelers to enjoy a smart and efficient screening experience.

TSA Pre✓® travelers may:

  • Leave shoes on.
  • Wear light outerwear and a belt through the metal detector.
  • Leave their laptop in their carry-on bag.
  • Leave 3-1-1 compliant liquids/gels bag in their carry-on bag.

TSAprecheck Logo
The TSA Pre✓® application program allows U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents to directly apply for TSA Pre✓®. Once approved, travelers will receive a “Known Traveler Number” and will have the opportunity to utilize TSA Pre✓® lanes at 133 U.S. airports when flying on 11 participating carriers:

  • Air Canada
  • Alaska Airlines
  • American Airlines
  • Delta Air Lines
  • Hawaiian Airlines
  • JetBlue Airways
  • Southwest Airlines
  • Sun Country Airlines
  • United Airlines
  • US Airways
  • Virgin America


  • The $85 enrollment fee is good for five years. That’s $17 a year. So what are you waiting for? Apply now for TSA Pre✓®
  • Read the full press release for additional information.
  • For more information about other trusted traveler programs that offer TSA Pre✓® eligibility, visit dhs.gov/tt.
  • Read this post if you already have a known traveler number (KTN) but are not receiving TSA Pre✓®.

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If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact us by clicking here.

33 comments:

RB said...

No one should have to enroll in any program in order to not be treated like a criminal, and that includes TSA's Pre Check.

Anonymous said...

rediculous comments from ex-TSA employees errrr, disgrunteled American Patriots in 5..4..3..2..1..
Susan, SSSS, the floor is yours.

Puddintane said...

"TSA needs millions more enrolled to make sure PreCheck lines are fully used.

“I’ve got to have people in those lanes. Otherwise, officers just stand there and fuel the perceptions” of TSA as a bloated bureaucracy, TSA Administrator John Pistole says."

"Enrollment" has increased by only 300,000 in 6 months. Doesn't seem that "millions more" want to enroll, now does it?

Anonymous said...

Why is this not the standard level of screening for ALL passengers, rather than a perk doled out to the wealthy, elite, and lucky?

Anonymous said...


Would Precheck exist if TSA had not botched so utterly its rollout of the slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners?

SSSS for Some Reason said...

"...Leave their laptop in their carry-on bag."

Because? Their laptop is so much safer, or my laptop is so much more dangerous?

Still not understanding why I have to prove I am not guilty of something before I can fly from here to there.

Adrian said...

What can a background check possibly reveal that can be correlated with whether a passenger is more of less of a risk?

Like the bogus billion-dollar SPOT program, PreCheck is television grade sci-fi designed to make us feel better without any actual improvement in security.

Anonymous said...

I guess I'll need to alert my friends and family that I am a high security risk because I choose not to pay the $85 bribe -- I mean fee -- to prove that I am low-risk.

Anonymous said...

in honor of your hysteric milestone, some additional suggestions for TSA to make our travel and security experience as convenient as possible:

1) eliminate TSA and return to pre-911 screening. the TSA makes things no more secure, and arguably less secure, since the last red team results made available to the public indicate that TSA is allowing 70% of prohibited items through, as opposed to 60% or lower in testing of the old systems. in addition, the 911 attacks focused on 2 gaps in security: unsecured cockpit doors, and the training of flight crews and passengers to be compliant. both of those are now corrected - no one is going to take over an airliner with a penknife.

2) full and total transparency of all DHS and TSA regulations, rules, procedures, and watch/no-fly lists, as well as public comment periods for new rules, and an independent appeal process for those placed on no fly or terrorist watch lists (as ordered by the federal courts).

3) eliminate the Pre-Bribe, er, Pre-Check program. it is a waste of taxpayer dollars as well as flat out insulting to be required to pay to have a background check done in order to be screened in a semi-sane way. if I hold a security clearance and a concealed weapons permit, the federal and state governments have already paid for or charged me for, a background check. why does TSA require this wasteful duplication???

4) eliminate ID requirements. it is unConstitutional (freedom to travel domestically is not guaranteed only if the govt can ID you), and it contributes nothing to security. what does it matter if you know my name, if I am carrying a bomb? why is my name any damn business of yours if I am not carrying a bomb or
intending some kind of threat?

Anonymous said...

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense. now you're even allowing college kids (kaydets) to endure more reasonable screening, but those who served and sacrificed for 20+ have to take their bloody shoes and belts off!!

Anonymous said...

Why not make the "smarter security experience" open to everyone? Why are people who can't afford it or aren't elite travelers subjected to a dumber security experience?

Anonymous said...

Pre Check should be the default level of screening for all travelers. Add in some additional screening for suspicious passengers and random additional screening for all passengers, and the level of safety will be the same. If you want to talk about risk based screening, virtually all passengers are not a risk, yet we are all treated as guilty.

Last year at MCO, I watched the majority of passengers getting sent through the Pre Check line. I was one of them because an Ipad arrow pointed to that line. There were no incidents of terrorism that day. I would bet almost all of those passengers were not enrolled in Pre Check.

Puddintane said...

" RB said...

No one should have to enroll in any program in order to not be treated like a criminal, and that includes TSA's Pre Check.

March 24, 2015 at 12:30 PM
Anonymous Anonymous said...

rediculous comments from ex-TSA employees errrr, disgrunteled American Patriots in 5..4..3..2..1..
Susan, SSSS, the floor is yours.

March 24, 2015 at 12:48 PM"

Thanks for further confirmation that you are a TSA employee with access to blog posts.

You wrote your comment almost immediately after RB wrote his and you left out reference to him in your comment, referencing only two other people whom you have determined to be former TSA employees. You are not as smart as you think you are.

Anonymous said...

"rediculous comments from ex-TSA employees errrr, disgrunteled American Patriots in 5..4..3..2..1..
Susan, SSSS, the floor is yours."

You sure do get upset over people asking perfectly legitimate questions about TSA, don't you? That's very strange. Most people don't feel the need to lie about people who ask perfectly legitimate questions.

Anonymous said...

Pre-check or not, TSA still performs screening to ensure that nothing malicious gets through. This is basically admitting that:

Shoes that pass through a metal detector are a low risk.
Light outerwear and belts that pass through a metal detector are a low risk.
TSA staff and equipment can analyze a laptop while still in a carry-on bag.
TSA staff and equipment can analyze liquids/gels while still in a carry-on bag.

It makes all the rules & procedures for the regular lanes seem quite ridiculous and not based on legitimate risk assessment.

Anonymous said...

Wow, Bobby. You're celebrating a Pre-Check enrollment milestone at the same that the TSA IG released a report indicating that a convicted terrorist was allowed through Pre-Check screening? From the way the IG's report reads, it was the ONE TIME in TSA's history that a TSO was able to identify and recognize an actual terrorist-- and his supervisor ordered him to LET THE TERRORIST THROUGH PRE-CHECK.

Funny how your blog has never mentioned the ONE DOCUMENTED INSTANCE where a TSO recognized a terrorist, Bobby. It's almost like you've evaded the matter completely-- perhaps because it's also an instance where the TSA intentionally allowed a known terrorist to board a flight without even STANDARD SCREENING?

Heck, the TSA's own INSPECTOR GENERAL seems to have recommended discontinuing (or at least heavily modifying) the Pre-Check program as a result of this monumental boneheadedness.

But here you are, trumpeting this program as a success. I guess black is white and up is down, too-- right, Bobby?

Anonymous said...

RBs comments confirm why he would never be qualified to make decisions in any security environment. Some folks are better left to simply follow the rules and not make them.

Anonymous said...

and yet, the obvious seems to elude some...

1) eliminate TSA and return to pre-911 screening. the TSA makes things no more secure, and arguably less secure, since the last red team results made available to the public indicate that TSA is allowing 70% of prohibited items through, as opposed to 60% or lower in testing of the old systems. in addition, the 911 attacks focused on 2 gaps in security: unsecured cockpit doors, and the training of flight crews and passengers to be compliant. both of those are now corrected - no one is going to take over an airliner with a penknife.

2) full and total transparency of all DHS and TSA regulations, rules, procedures, and watch/no-fly lists, as well as public comment periods for new rules, and an independent appeal process for those placed on no fly or terrorist watch lists (as ordered by the federal courts).

, Ya, lets tell the terrorist why and how screening proceedures take place. Heck, give the the SOP.
3) eliminate the Pre-Bribe, er, Pre-Check program. it is a waste of taxpayer dollars as well as flat out insulting to be required to pay to have a background check done in order to be screened in a semi-sane way. if I hold a security clearance and a concealed weapons permit, the federal and state governments have already paid for or charged me for, a background check. why does TSA require this wasteful duplication???
Different level of background check perhaps...perhaps as with finger prints, iformation isnt shared with different agencies.Just a guess

4) eliminate ID requirements. it is unConstitutional (freedom to travel domestically is not guaranteed only if the govt can ID you), and it contributes nothing to security. what does it matter if you know my name, if I am carrying a bomb? why is my name any damn business of yours if I am not carrying a bomb or
intending some kind of threat?
because you dont want to know who is getting on a plane? Personaly, I would like to know

Anonymous said...

I travel pretty much every week, my tickets are twice what they were 5 years ago and you want to extract another 85 dollars from me. I didn't say anything when everyone was on your case, this is how I am repaid.

Anonymous said...

Please provide proof that passing the PreCheck background check and paying the PreCheck fee are statistically significant indicators of a flyer's "trustworthiness" with respect to said flyer's involvement in a terror plot.

Without such proof, PreCheck is simply a tool to shut up frequent flyers.

SSSS for Some Reason said...

Puddintane said...

Anonymous Anonymous said...

rediculous comments from ex-TSA employees errrr, disgrunteled American Patriots in 5..4..3..2..1..
Susan, SSSS, the floor is yours.

March 24, 2015 at 12:48 PM"

....referencing only two other people whom you have determined to be former TSA employees

I know something our Bold typing Anonymous doesn't..... I'm not TSA. Never have been, never will be.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said because you dont want to know who is getting on a plane? Personaly, I would like to know

Where did you get the idea that you had the right to know? Do you work for the airlines? Or the credit card or payment processing center? Why do you think you should know who is on the plane if you aren't directly involved with the contract of passage with the airlines?

Anonymous said...

Who's the second grader that keeps referring to Mr. Curtis as "Bobby?"

Wintermute said...

Anonymous said...

because you dont want to know who is getting on a plane? Personaly, I would like to know

What difference does it make? If they aren't carrying anything dangerous, identity matters precisely squat... TSA acknowledges as such when they let a know terrorist use precheck.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...

Who's the second grader that keeps referring to Mr. Curtis as "Bobby?"

March 27, 2015 at 9:52 PM"

Actually, it's Mr. Burns. Curtis Burns, a/k/a Blogger Bob, a/k/a Bobby to some.

Anonymous said...

Actually, it's Mr. Burns. Curtis Burns, a/k/a Blogger Bob, a/k/a Bobby to some.

If Bobby actually answers any ONE of the remarkably simple questions I've posed (e.g., "Why does the TSA allow a known perjurer to continue working at PHL?", "Why aren't you shouting loudly about the ONE DOCUMENTED INSTANCE in history that a TSO has identified a known terrorist?", "Why do you allow misspelled personal attacks from pro-TSA commenters through immediately, but delete or hold up legitimate questions from less TSA-enthused commenters?"), I'll happily refer to Bobby by any name he pleases. I'll gladly call him Bob, Mr. Burns, Mr. TSA Awesomeness Central, or even learn to type that stupid little symbol that Prince came up with-- whatever floats Bobby's boat.

But the TSA Blog Team lacks the courage to actually address its actions, so I'll probably be calling him Bobby for a long time.

Anonymous said...

TSA will never dignify your silly questions with a response. Keep submitting them though! Doing the same thing over and over and never getting a different result tells us all we need to know about you.

Anonymous said...

Its a bs system. They are generally closed/don't offer it or at a security entrance far away from where you need to be. Another scam. You are welcome for my $80 dollars.

Corey Heim said...

"because you dont want to know who is getting on a plane? Personaly, I would like to know"

Why? The document checker doesn't check any watchlist, doesn't run NCIC on anyone, etc. TSA tells us screening itself is to keep the aircraft safe. So if the unknown person passes screening, how can they pose a threat to the aircraft, even if they are a "bad guy"?

Here's what I want to know: TSA tells us the shoes have to come off, the belt off, the coats off so the screening tools can be effective. They how can people sent through Precheck do all those things? I don't want a "the person who qualifies for PreCheck poses a lower risk" answer. Because that's the PERSON. So if you think I'm a lower risk as a person, I can do things TSA thinks other people do is dangerous? It's illogical and counter-intuitive. Which is exactly why it will continue.

Anonymous said...

When will precheck be mandated to travel in America?

Anonymous said...

West, why are you allowing comments by anonymous TSA employees who are attempting to quash the American public's speech?

Anonymous said...

West, it's been about two weeks. Why haven't you answered my question from April 17?

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
Anonymous said because you dont want to know who is getting on a plane? Personaly, I would like to know

Where did you get the idea that you had the right to know? Do you work for the airlines? Or the credit card or payment processing center? Why do you think you should know who is on the plane if you aren't directly involved with the contract of passage with the airlines?

March 27, 2015 at 4:47 PM
----------------------------------
well said, Anon. I would add that you currently DON'T know who is flying with you unless they happen to be an acquaintance. the ID check does not contribute to security, is needlessly invasive of personal privacy, and wastes tax dollars (on the salary of the TSO assigned to do the checks).