Thursday, March 26, 2015

TSA Pre✓® application program at 1 million and rising: Impact for those without a Known Traveler Number



TSA Precheck. Be there at your best. (Female hiker in mountains)
Earlier this week, TSA announced that over 1 million travelers have enrolled in the TSA Pre✓® application program, and more than 3.6 million travelers are eligible for TSA Pre✓® expedited screening by participating in one of three trusted traveler programs offered by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP): Global Entry, NEXUS and SENTRI.  These travelers have received a “Known Traveler Number” and now have the opportunity to utilize TSA Pre✓® lanes when flying on 11 participating carriers; members of CBP programs utilize their “PASSID” as their Known Traveler Number.

Additionally, members of the U.S. Armed Forces, including those serving in the U.S. Coast Guard, Reserves and National Guard, are also eligible for TSA Pre✓®: they utilize their Department of Defense identification number as their KTN. 

What changes are on the horizon for travelers?

Have a KTN
If you are one of the individuals listed above, who has a KTN, you are all set for expedited screening. Just follow these helpful tips to ensure your KTN is listed in your reservation in order to utilize TSA Pre✓® at 133 airports nationwide.

Travelers without a KTN 

As more and more travelers obtain KTNs, soon, travelers without a Known Traveler Number or KTN, including those who previously “opted-in” via a frequent flyer program, will notice a reduction in the frequency in which they are chosen for TSA Pre✓®. If you want to keep receiving TSA Pre✓® on a consistent/reliable basis for the next five years, you are encouraged to enroll in one of the four trusted traveler programs offered by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security:


To learn more about these programs, and to view a comparison chart of the benefits, visit www.dhs.gov/tt.

As always, TSA continues to incorporate random and unpredictable security measures both seen and unseen throughout the airport. All travelers will be screened, and no individual will be guaranteed expedited screening.  

Ross Feinstein, TSA Press Secretary
@TSAmedia_RossF  

Follow @TSABlogTeam on Twitter and Instagram!

39 comments:

Frank said...

As a non-US citizen/PR this is extremely bad news. I don't qualify for any of the 4 programs mentioned, despite living (legally) in the US for several years, travelling very frequently, and currently getting PreCheck access for about 90% of my flights via my opt-in through my top-tier frequent flyer status.

Are these any plans to extend these programs to non-US Citizens/LPRs?

Anonymous said...

Why is this not the standard level of screening for ALL passengers, rather than a perk doled out to the wealthy, elite, and lucky?

Anonymous said...

Would Precheck exist if TSA had not botched so utterly its rollout of the slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners?

Anonymous said...

Why not make the "smarter security experience" open to everyone? Why are people who can't afford it or aren't elite travelers subjected to a dumber security experience?

Anonymous said...

I think it's awesome that whereas we used to fly without these things we now are offered the opportunity to pay money for the same exact service.

Anonymous said...

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense. now you're even allowing college kids (kaydets) to endure more reasonable screening, but those who served and sacrificed for 20+ have to take their bloody shoes and belts off!!

Adrian said...

What percentage of people who apply for PreCheck are approved?

Anonymous said...

We shouldn't need known traveler numbers. Pre Check should be the default level of screening for most passengers. It is a risk based program. The percentage of passengers who are a risk is extremely low, yet the majority of all passengers are treated as if they are threats. If there is suspicion about a passenger then they should get extra screening.

RB said...

Anonymous said...
I think it's awesome that whereas we used to fly without these things we now are offered the opportunity to pay money for the same exact service.

March 26, 2015 at 5:44 PM

.................
Excellent statement. Thank you!

RB said...

Adrian said...
What percentage of people who apply for PreCheck are approved?

March 27, 2015 at 11:21 AM
...................
100% of those who have $85 to pay the government.

Anonymous said...

Wow. Since when is $85 an exorbitant cost only the "elite" or "wealthy" can afford?

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense. now you're even allowing college kids (kaydets) to endure more reasonable screening, but those who served and sacrificed for 20+ have to take their bloody shoes and belts off!!

March 27, 2015 at 8:02 AM
-------------------
And we continue to ignore your posts. Maybe you should take the hint.

Amos ZEZMER said...

It is incredible that we are invited to pay an enrollment fee for expedited screening. Don't we already pay enough in TSA security fees assessed on our tickets for the surly and idiotic service we get? If we are not accepted to this "new" program, is our enrollment fee refunded? Ii seems that we are simply walking cash machines as soon as we pay for a flight and enter the airport: fees from the airlines and, now, hooray! another fee from TSA for "better" service!

Nose said...

For those of you whining about the elite and wealthy...pre-check costs $20 a year. If you can't afford that, you should be looking for work and not trolling government blogs...

Anonymous said...

I request that TSA provide proof that PreCheck is actually effective. PreCheck otherwise appears to discriminate against lower-income travelers because higher-income travelers are more likely to be frequent fliers, more likely to be able to take time off from their jobs to travel to and participate in the PreCheck interview, and more likely to be able to pay the PreCheck enrollment fee.

Please also provide PreCheck enrollment statistics related to demographics such as age and ethnicity so that the public can see if PreCheck discriminates based on factors other than income.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
Wow. Since when is $85 an exorbitant cost only the "elite" or "wealthy" can afford?

Since when should I have to to pay the Government to exercise a right that was mine to begin with?

And why should I have to pay the Government for this privilege that is only good at certain airports and then is still at the discretion of the agents at the checkpoint?

Robert Brown said...

Something is wrong in PreCheck Land...my wife & I applied at the same place & time; I got my KTN within one week and she's still waiting over five weeks later.

Anonymous said...

Why is precheck not the standard for ALL passengers?

Wintermute said...

Anonymous Anonymous said...
"Wow. Since when is $85 an exorbitant cost only the "elite" or "wealthy" can afford?"

If you've got $85 lying around to waste on the chance of buying some of your liberties back, I could put it to better use ;) IOW, $85 may be nothing to you, but for those of us in the former middle class, it's quite a lot, actually.

Anonymous said...

Last summer at MCO, I watched as over half of the people got sent to the Pre Check line. I was one of them, even though I never signed up for the program. I was directed to the line by a random arrow on an Ipad. Many of the other people were just directed to the line without the Ipad arrow. There were no terrorist incidents that day so the Pre Check level of screening was sufficient. Why isn't this used for most passengers at all airports?

Anonymous said...

If you've got $85 lying around to waste on the chance of buying some of your liberties back, I could put it to better use ;) IOW, $85 may be nothing to you, but for those of us in the former middle class, it's quite a lot, actually.

$85.00 for 5 years. Thats $17.00 a year. If you fly one round trip a year, thats $8.50 per flight. If you cant afford $8.50, you probably shouldnt be flying anyway. If you only fly one round trip a year, the extra 10 minutes per flight is only 20 minutes out of your year...
$85.00 is really pretty insicnificant even if you are just a one time flyer.

SSSS for Some Reason said...

"...$85.00 is really pretty insicnificant even if you are just a one time flyer."

What if Precheck isn't available at one of the airports I am flying to or through?

What if the agents 'randomly' select me for additional screening thereby negating any benefit of having paid for pre-check?

What if the magic arrow-pointing ipad points me to the regular line instead of the pre-check line?

There are a lot of questions about this system that make me wonder what the benefit of this system is to anyone other than the folks getting the $85 from me.

Wintermute said...

Anonymous said...
"$85.00 for 5 years. Thats $17.00 a year. If you fly one round trip a year, thats $8.50 per flight. If you cant afford $8.50, you probably shouldnt be flying anyway. If you only fly one round trip a year, the extra 10 minutes per flight is only 20 minutes out of your year...
$85.00 is really pretty insicnificant even if you are just a one time flyer."

That's not the point... Why should I have to pay ANYTHING to buy back my rights? And then still not having any guarantee? It's a waste of money, even if it were 1 cent per flight.

Lisa Simeone said...

Nose said...
For those of you whining about the elite and wealthy...pre-check costs $20 a year. If you can't afford that, you should be looking for work and not trolling government blogs...
March 30, 2015 at 10:13 AM


Nose, yours is getting longer by the minute. Pre-Check costs $85, not $20. The fact that it's an extortion scheme -- and a lousy one at that -- is another matter.

GSOLTSO said...

Lisa sez - "Pre-Check costs $85, not $20. The fact that it's an extortion scheme -- and a lousy one at that -- is another matter."

The actual statement was "$20 a year, which calculates out to more than the $85 - for $20 a year, the individual could actually participate in Global Entry (which is $100).

West
TSA Blog Team

Anonymous said...

What if Precheck isn't available at one of the airports I am flying to or through?

What if the agents 'randomly' select me for additional screening thereby negating any benefit of having paid for pre-check?
TSA officers have no control over who is "opted" out. That is done by the airlines.

What if the magic arrow-pointing ipad points me to the regular line instead of the pre-check line? if you are precheck, the arrow has no effect on you. If your boarding pass says precheck, your precheck.

There are a lot of questions about this system that make me wonder what the benefit of this system is to anyone other than the folks getting the $85 from me.
do some research. the answers are out there. Thats how I get my answers. Ask the officers at the airport. they are generally more than happy to answer your questions for you. Problem is, many are so convinced that TSA officers are horrible people they would rather remain ignorant and just complain.

Anonymous said...

"Robert Brown said...
Something is wrong in PreCheck Land...my wife & I applied at the same place & time; I got my KTN within one week and she's still waiting over five weeks later.

March 31, 2015 at 1:38 PM"
-------------------------------
Maybe they know something about her you don't.

Anonymous said...

Amazing that some are complaining about something that is completely optional. No one is mandating that you sign up and pay. If it is not to your advantage, then do not sign up for it. If it is not offered at your airport, then you are in the same position as everyone else so it really doesn't matter. Some of you are probably complaining about "more leg room" and "pre-boarding privaledges". If you are not willing to pay for a perk, then don't complain about those who are willing to pay.

Anonymous said...

I finally acquiesced and got GE, even though I'd successfully flown over one hundred times without running down the aisle screaming or trying to take over the AC. As a pilot and TS cleared person I thought, and continue to think, that the programmes are security theatre with no impact on anyone other than those who laugh as they develop these programs and now turn them into revenue generation. DHS/TSA should be held to account on the effectiveness of these programs by Congress, and all passengers should be eligible for pre-9/11 screening without having to apply for Pre. Flying multiple times, having no risk factors, etc should be the determiner - Israel seems to have it right.

After all, how can we be safe unless someone asks us if we've "packed our bags"?

Anonymous said...

TSA will continue to cram people into managed inclusion; this means that prechecks will remain long.

Anonymous said...

TSA will continue to cram people into managed inclusion; this means that prechecks will remain long.

Since pre-check lanes process passengers faster; "long" lines are a meaningless comparison.

SSSS for Some Reason said...

"...Amazing that some are complaining about something that is completely optional. "

No. Not quite.

The complaint is why does someone paying $85 get less security than those who don't pay? If the lower level of security is acceptable for those that pay, why is it not equally acceptable for everyone else?

This isn't an airline perk you get with frequent flyer miles, this is a government agency that has tasked itself with aviation security. This is a Government Agency charging the taxpaying citizen to be treated the same way all citizens were treated before the Agency was established.

Anonymous said...

SSSS..... do,you understand the difference between a pre-check vetted passenger and a standard passenger?

And why now do you want all passengers treated the same with no risk assessments after years of complaining TSA "treats everyone like criminals?"

Anonymous said...

I haven't been to the blog in a few years because it got so completely unhinged with anti government/anti TSA blather it got boring. Glad to see nothing's changed. Still the same old "I hate it because I hate TSA" hating haters just hating away. See you again in another few years, say noonish?

SSSS for Some Reason said...

Anonymous said...
SSSS..... do,you understand the difference between a pre-check vetted passenger and a standard passenger?

Honestly... no. I don't understand how that person giving you $85 is somehow safer than me who didn't. What part of them filling out a form makes them somehow safer to travel?

And why now do you want all passengers treated the same with no risk assessments after years of complaining TSA "treats everyone like criminals?"

Nope. Not even close.

I don't want *any* passengers treated like criminals. Not just the ones who paid you the $85.

It used to be that I was treated like a citizen until the TSA came along. Now you expect me to pay you to not be treated like a criminal. Back in the old days that was considered extortion and was illegal.

Anonymous said...

"do,you understand the difference between a pre-check vetted passenger and a standard passenger?"

If the "vetting" were at all meaningful, TSA wouldn't put "unvetted" passengers into the precheck line - yet TSA does so on a daily basis.

Unknown said...

Before cutting off the people who have been frequent flyers for years, why no first cut out the non frequent flyer TSA likes to send to the pre-check lines in large numbers?

Anonymous said...

When will precheck be mandated to travel in America?

Anonymous said...

Are TSA employees gifted with Pre Check and if so do they have to claim the $85 fee that everyone else has to pay as income?