Friday, January 9, 2015

TSA Week in Review: 32 Firearms Discovered in Carry-on Bags, a Sickle, and More



Loaded firearm discovered in carry-on bag at ATL
Loaded firearm discovered in carry-on bag at ATL
32 Firearms Discovered This Week – Of the 32 firearms, 26 were loaded and 13 had rounds chambered.

Artfully Concealed Prohibited Items – It’s important to examine your bags prior to traveling to ensure you are not carrying any prohibited items. If a prohibited item is discovered in your bag or on your body, you could be cited and possibly arrested by law enforcement. Here are a few examples from this week where prohibited items were found by our officers in strange places.
  • A lipstick knife was discovered in a carry-on bag at Buffalo (BUF).  
Sickle - A sickle was discovered in a carry-on bag at Newark (EWR). 
Sickle (EWR)
Sickle (EWR)
Inert Ordnance and Grenades etc. – We continue to find inert grenades and other weaponry on a weekly basis. Please keep in mind that if an item looks like a real bomb, grenade, mine, etc., it is prohibited. When these items are found at a checkpoint or in checked baggage, they can cause significant delays because the explosives detection professionals must respond to resolve the alarm. Even if they are novelty items, you are prohibited from bringing them on the aircraft.  Read here on why inert items cause problems.
  • Three inert grenades and 115 inert rounds contained in a WWII style military helmet were discovered in checked baggage at Denver (DEN).  
  • An inert grenade was detected in checked baggage at Grand Junction (GJT).
  • Grenade shaped cologne bottles were discovered in carry-on bags at Minneapolis (MSP) and Sacramento (SMF).
Inert Grenade (GJT), Grenade-shaped Cologne (MSN)
Inert Grenade (GJT), Grenade-shaped Cologne (MSN)
Miscellaneous Prohibited Items In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons and many other prohibited items too numerous to note.
Knives
From left, items discovered at: FAT, EWR, DAL, ALB, BUR and LAX
Knives & grenade-shaped cologne discovered in passenger's bag at SMF
Knives & grenade-shaped cologne discovered in passenger's bag at SMF

Stun Guns20 stun guns were discovered in carry-on bags this week. Three were discovered at Sacramento (SMF), two at Dallas Love (DAL), two at Orange County (SNA), two at Phoenix (PHX), two at San Juan (SJU), and the remainder were discovered at Bozeman (BZN), Kansas City (MCI), Minneapolis (MSP), Mobile (MOB), Portland (PDX), Providence (PVD), Rochester (ROC), San Francisco (SFO), and Tulsa (TUL). 

Ammunition – When packed properly, ammunition can be transported in your checked baggage, but it is never permissible to pack ammo in your carry-on bag.
Clockwise from top left, firearms discovered at: BNA, IAH, TUL, TPA, PHX & ONT
Clockwise from top left, firearms discovered at: BNA, IAH, TUL, TPA, PHX & ONT
32 Firearms Discovered This Week – Of the 32 firearms, 26 were loaded and 13 had rounds chambered.*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates.

You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms. Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $7,500. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions, that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

If you haven’t seen it yet, make sure you check out our TSA Blog Year in Review for 2013. You can also check out 2011 & 2012 as well.

Follow @TSABlogTeam on Twitter and Instagram!


If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact us by clicking here. 

57 comments:

Thomas Joy said...

Here we go AGAIN. How can you not know you have a firearm on your person or in your carry on luggage ?. Did it miraculously appear or did someone put it on your person or in your carry on when you were not looking ?.

If you FORGOT you had it, then you have no business possessing a firearm and should be relieved of it and not be able to posess a firearm EVER. If they ever come up for a cure for stupidity, Please see you physician immediately.

RB said...

Still not one word about TSA's complete and total security failure that allowed the transportation of over 100 firearms, some loaded, in the passenger cabinof passenger flights. Taxpayers spend over $8 billion per year on TSA and all we get is a big seine net with a big hole in it.

Anonymous said...

As always, absolutely nothing you needed your slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners to detect. Meanwhile, how many people suffered physical searches thanks to false alarms on these useless machines?

Why are Curtis Burns and West Cooper unwilling to address, let alone answer, that question?

How many weeks has it been since you last trumpeted something dangerous you found with the naked body scanners?

Anonymous said...

The TSA confiscated a bottle of perfume again?

Notice it. Check it out. Confirm it is a BOTTLE OF PERFUME. Let it through.

Stop stealing from the American public.

Thomas Joy said...

Just how big was this bottle of perfume ? 3 ounces is the maximum limit. If its that important, mail it to your destination.

SSSS for Some Reason said...

And..... no terrorist.

Good catch on the perfume bottle. Some old lady might have seen that bottle and mistaken the passenger for a gun smuggler and beaten the crap out of them.

Anonymous said...

"If you FORGOT you had it, then you have no business possessing a large bottle of water and should be relieved of it and not be able to posess a large bottle of water EVER."

Fixed it for you. TSA thinks large bottles of water are dangerous, too.

RB said...

Anonymous said...The TSA confiscated a bottle of perfume again? Notice it. Check it out. Confirm it is a BOTTLE OF PERFUME. Let it through.Stop stealing from the American public.
January 10, 2015 at 8:16 AM
---------------------------
If TSA was't stealing from travelers what else would they have to do?

Anonymous said...

ANYTHING that has the same appearance as a gun, grenade etc is not allowed. Not becauseof what is in it (Perfume, water, jelly etc.) but because another passenger could see it and fear that it was real, causing unnecessary panic.

Anonymous said...

"The TSA confiscated a bottle of perfume again?"

Maybe leave the grenade perfume at home. You wouldn't yell "fire!" in a crowded theater now would you?

Anonymous said...

"How many weeks has it been since you last trumpeted something dangerous you found with the naked body scanners?"

How many years has TSA kept you safe?

Anonymous said...

Touching the breasts, buttocks, genitals, and sticking your hands in the pants of innocent travelers is disgusting and abnormal.

How many travelers were forced to endure this type of assault at the hands of US government employees last week, blotter team?

Anonymous said...

"... Anonymous said...
"How many weeks has it been since you last trumpeted something dangerous you found with the naked body scanners?"

How many years has TSA kept you safe?"

Not sure, really. The TSA keeping us safe is up for debate. Most of the policies in place at the TSA don't provide any kind of safety. Nor any kind of security. So other than the illusion of same what has the TSA really accomplished?

SSSS for Some Reason said...

"... Anonymous said...
ANYTHING that has the same appearance as a gun, grenade etc is not allowed. Not becauseof what is in it (Perfume, water, jelly etc.) but because another passenger could see it and fear that it was real, causing unnecessary panic."

So the TSA's job is to calm the public, to prevent them from freaking out at the mere sight of something they might find objectionable?

Anonymous said...

"How many years has TSA kept you safe?"

TSA's naked body scanners, which have never detected a dangerous object, by definition have never kept anyone safe.

Still, a question about the false positive rate seems perfectly legitimate to me. Why do you think Curtis Burns and West Cooper are too afraid to answer it?

RB said...

Thomas Joy said...
Just how big was this bottle of perfume ? 3 ounces is the maximum limit. If its that important, mail it to your destination.

January 10, 2015 at 12:07 PM

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

100 ml or 3.4 ounces.



RB said...

Anonymous SSSS for Some Reason said...
And..... no terrorist.

Good catch on the perfume bottle. Some old lady might have seen that bottle and mistaken the passenger for a gun smuggler and beaten the crap out of them.

January 10, 2015 at 3:18 PM

...................
TSA isn't worried about guns unless it is a passenger trying to carry one through security. Any other avenue is perfectly ok. Look at the events at Atlanta as proof.

Over 100 guns on multiple flights in the passenger cabin. Some loaded. One was an AK-47 and TSA didn't find even one of them.

RB said...

Anonymous said...
Touching the breasts, buttocks, genitals, and sticking your hands in the pants of innocent travelers is disgusting and abnormal.

How many travelers were forced to endure this type of assault at the hands of US government employees last week, blotter team?

January 12, 2015 at 5:58 AM
....................
No one should have to endure such treatment without first being arrested.

Anonymous said...

The TSA confiscated a bottle of perfume again?

Notice it. Check it out. Confirm it is a BOTTLE OF PERFUME. Let it through.

Stop stealing from the American public.

lets assume for a second that the perfume belongs to a person who intends to do harm. And really, there is no way of knowing. Then lets assume at 30,000 feet the pull it from their bag and attempt to hijack a plane with it. Will all the passengers on board know it is a purfume bottle? Probably not. Error ( if it even an error) on the side of caution. No replica weapons, pretty simple. TSA does not confiscate anything. Passengers are given options. One of which it to voluntarily abandon the item.

Anonymous said...

Fixed it for you. TSA thinks large bottles of water are dangerous, too.

No, not really. Does nobody have common sence? Everyone know for a fact that liquids can be made into explosives. How do you combat that? eliminate liquids. The other choice is allow liquids and check them all...how much would that slow things down? Quit worrting about the simple things. Just buy water at the airport if you have to have it. Simple solution.

Anonymous said...

How many travelers were forced to endure this type of assault at the hands of US government employees last week, blotter team?

Can I answer? ZERO!!

Anonymous said...

How many travelers were forced to endure this type of assault at the hands of US government employees last week, blotter team?

Zero. Next question.

Mike Toreno said...

"How many weeks has it been since you last trumpeted something dangerous you found with the naked body scanners?"

How many years has TSA kept you safe?


Zero. The TSA's slovenlieness and laziness lines to back up at the checkpoints, creating a vulnerable target for an attacker. In addition, the TSA's laziness and concentration on perfum bottles causes them to miss 70% of weapons brought to the checkpoint, making it certain that any moderately carefully planned attempt to bring weapons on board an aircraft will succeed.

CliffOnTheRoad said...

Had one of those non-working grenades till my garage sale. They sell for $44 now. Wow.

How about a change of pace on this blog. Tell us something instead of the usual "we found a gun, again." In that respect, this blog isn't any help to the traveling public.

I would like an answer to this question, based upon a quote below; How many people have been caught with a banned item, or arrested, DUE TO Behavior Detection Employees? (Article incorrectly calls them BD Officiers)

That means in addition to the primary inspection we all go through. Maybe it is an expense not justified. The quote:

Feinstein says that "TSA's Behavior Detection and Analysis program identifies potentially high-risk individuals exhibiting behavior indicative of excessive fear or stress and re-routes them for additional screening by looking for a combination of individual indicators that warrant follow-up."

Rifle said...

There is no excuse in this world to walk into a TSA checkpoint or any establishment and trying to convince security that "I forgot I had my weapon on me ". If you are that forgetful you should not be carrying it anywhere

Anonymous said...

AnonymousJanuary 11, 2015 at 5:15 PM
"How many weeks has it been since you last trumpeted something dangerous you found with the naked body scanners?"

How many years has TSA kept you safe?


TSA has never kept us safe.

Anonymous said...

How many years has TSA kept you safe?

almost 12 now I believe. With a 100% success rate. Better success than ICE, CPB, any police agency, any fire agency.

Chris Boyce said...

Is there a cease-fire in the TSA's War on Drugs? Or, are you simply concealing what you are doing from the American citizens?

ACT said...

LOL at the Anonymous who tried to "prove" the TSA was reasonable for conducting a perfume bottle. You're right. If someone panicked because of a perfume bottle it would be totally unnecessary!

Also, your assertion that anything that looks like a weapon isn't allowed doesn't explain the TSA confiscation of a round Jimmy Choo perfume bottle, a 2" toy gun, a 1.5" gun shaped USB drive, a toy light saber, a ray gun belt buckle, a purse with a gun design, etc.

If you are so scared of "anything that looks like a weapon" that you're going to react with "unnecessay panic," how do you get near any vehicle, restaurant, or store in an airport?

Anonymous said...

You molested Miss America! Really. This is insane. We are not a police state so quit acting like it. Its bad enough you threw away my unopened hair gel.

Anonymous said...

I guess the weekly "travel tips" have gone the way of the dodo bird.

Falcon-One said...

Anonymous said...
The TSA confiscated a bottle of perfume again?

Notice it. Check it out. Confirm it is a BOTTLE OF PERFUME. Let it through.

Stop stealing from the American public.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


Once again, this is NOT Theft or stealing. Every passenger is given the options to:

1. Check it in there checked baggage.

2. Take it out to their car.

3. Give it to someone who is not traveling with them.

4. Dispose of it themselves.

5. Voluntarily abandon it to the TSA.

If you follow the rules, there will be no problem.

PickAname said...

I know this is going to be difficult for you to grasp, blotter team, but give it a try.

Make all TSA and DHS department employees identify themselves when posting on this blotter.

You keep saying, West, that we don't know who is a TSAnonymous and who is just pretending to be, so this will eliminate all problems.

If you are a TSA or DHS employee, get a Google+ or Blogger acct. If West and TSSRon can do it, you certainly can!

All TSA and DHS employees should always login and use their online account when posting on this blotter.

Does ANYONE at TSA want to build trust and agreement with the American public? Start by having your employees be honest.

Anonymous said...

Anon said..."TSA has never kept us safe."

Was this posted before or after your safe landing?

Anonymous said...

"Can I answer? ZERO!!"

Ah, so you're lying. West Cooper, Curtis Burns, why do you let TSA screeners post things you know to be false?

Anonymous said...

John Barker said, "RB and Anonymous why are you trying to stop persumed TSA employees from commenting in this blog. Don't they have the right of free speech? Always fighting for rights and the what is constitutional but at the same time trying to deprive someone else's rights. I defend TSA because from the airports I do fly out off I have always been treated with respect and dignity. RB, not just TSA has bad apples. CBP, FBI, IRS, and other agencies have more thorough background checks and there is still corruption. There is no need to disrespect TSA's employees calling them names or like most of you like calling them "clerks". We all know they are not law enforcement but they still deserve respect. What is this hatred felt towards them? They have a job to do please let them do it."

Sums it up quite nice.

Anonymous said...

PickAname said, "Make all TSA and DHS department employees identify themselves when posting"

In today's climate of active threats against those in uniform, I'd say it's better DHS/TSA Officers don't identify themselves on social media sites.

Anonymous said...

Does ANYONE at TSA want to build trust and agreement with the American public? Start by having your employees be honest.
are you trying to stop freedom of speech? Does it matter who posts what? I didnt see your name on your post...stop looking for black helicopters and stop worrying about who post what. Its doesnt matter who, its the content that is important.

RB said...

PickAname said...
I know this is going to be difficult for you to grasp, blotter team, but give it a try.

Make all TSA and DHS department employees identify themselves when posting on this blotter.

You keep saying, West, that we don't know who is a TSAnonymous and who is just pretending to be, so this will eliminate all problems.

If you are a TSA or DHS employee, get a Google+ or Blogger acct. If West and TSSRon can do it, you certainly can!

All TSA and DHS employees should always login and use their online account when posting on this blotter.

Does ANYONE at TSA want to build trust and agreement with the American public? Start by having your employees be honest.

January 14, 2015 at 9:45 PM
...........................

Trust, Responsibility, and Accountability are the last things TSA wants.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous A said: "How many travelers were forced to endure this type of assault at the hands of US government employees last week, blotter team?"

Anonymous B said: "Can I answer? ZERO!!"

Anonymous B is incorrect. Anybody who observes a checkpoint for 10 minutes will see TSA employees with their hands in people's crotches. Once again, Anonymous B (who often bolds his/her text) chooses to make baseless statements.

Anonymous B, why do you continue to post incorrect information here? Liquid bomb plots are not viable (as many other commentors have noted), TSA does confiscate harmless items (as many other commentors have noted), someone with a 2-inch toy gun is not going to hijack a plane (as many other commentors have noted), and it is a logical fallacy to insist that TSA's effectiveness is proven by an absence of terror attacks (as many other commentors have noted).

I understand that you may be scared to contemplate that TSA is not as effective as you wish, but at some point you really need to turn to critical thinking.

SSSS for Some Reason said...

Anonymous Anonymous said...lets assume for a second that the perfume belongs to a person who intends to do harm. And really, there is no way of knowing.

The passengers should be allowed NOTHING in the cabin. You know, because there is no way of knowing what they intend to do.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
Fixed it for you. TSA thinks large bottles of water are dangerous, too.

No, not really. Does nobody have common sence? Everyone know for a fact that liquids can be made into explosives.

If those bottles are so incredibly dangerous then why are they simply tossed into a rubbish bin right next to the long lines of people?

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
How many travelers were forced to endure this type of assault at the hands of US government employees last week, blotter team?

Can I answer? ZERO!!

Your answer is wrong.

I flew last week and I was subjected to that type of assault.

What crime was I suspected of to be treated like such a criminal? Wanting to fly to another state.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
How many years has TSA kept you safe?

almost 12 now I believe. With a 100% success rate.

You have a very interesting definition of 'success.'

The recent gun-smuggling issue would lead me to believe you have no idea what the word success actually means.

Anonymous said...

West, who approves the Bold Blotter Intern's comments?

Anonymous said...

Why do TSA screeners react so negatively and bring up straw man arguments when encouraged to identify themselves when they post on a TSA website?

What are you really afraid of? Why are you so angry with the American public?

Why do you refuse to even consistently use a pseudonym so you can be identified as aTSA employee? Are you that embarrassed? Do you realize that by attacking the American taxpaying public and any US citizen who criticizes the TSA you may be in violation of this blog and TSA social media policies?

What are you really afraid of? Who approves your posts? Why aren't the approvers held responsible when TSA employees violate this blog and TSA social media policy.

Time to take it to Congress again. Right on time with DHS budgets.

RB said...

 Falcon-One said...

Once again, this is NOT Theft or stealing. Every passenger is given the options to:

1. Check it in there checked baggage.

2. Take it out to their car.

3. Give it to someone who is not traveling with them.

4. Dispose of it themselves.

5. Voluntarily abandon it to the TSA. If you follow the rules, there will be no problem.

January 14, 2015 at 6:22 PM
..........................................
TSA is authorized by law and regulation to conduct an Administrative Search for:

1. Weapons

2. Explosives

3. Incendiaries

Should TSA find an item in the 3 categories the item is excluded from entering the sterile area as a minimum.

I think a strong and convincing argument can be made that any restrictions of items that are not WEI exceeds TSA's authority and the interdiction of those none threat items could be classified as theft by federal employees.

The so-called choices TSA claims to offer travelers are for the most point not really available and are really a case of DYWTFT.

TSA needs to get back to screening for WEI and leave the rest of our stuff alone.

BOLD Commenter said...

Are you proud of your employer, the TSA, Bold Blotter Intern? Are you proud of the work you do for the TSA? Are you proud of the comments you make here? Do you approve your own comments?

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...

"lets assume for a second that the perfume belongs to a person who intends to do harm"

Bad assumption. Last I checked, it was "innocent until proven guilty." Your assumption presumes guilt. It's that complete mindset that is completely and utterly un-American.

Lisa Simeone said...

"A lipstick knife was discovered in a carry-on bag at Buffalo (BUF)."

A lipstick knife? Oh noes!! Thank god you protected us!

Anonymous said...

One cannot voluntarily abandon an item when it is seized and confiscated under duress by government employees.

Louis Richard said...

Again, Bold Blotter Intern, why are you so afraid to set up a pseudononymous account on Google or Blogger and do just like West, TSSRon, and Every Falcon One does and consistently use that account when oosting here?

TSA employees have a duty to follow TSA social media policies on and off of work hours. TSA employees have a duty to follow dept computer usage policies. TSA employees have a duty to follow blog policies.

So, Bold Blotter Intern, are you going to do your duty as a TSA employee? Yes or no?

Anonymous said...

AnonymousJanuary 15, 2015 at 8:39 AM
Anon said..."TSA has never kept us safe."

Was this posted before or after your safe landing?
---
With a 70% failure rate, that safe landing was not due to the TSA, and more due to the fact that terrorism is a rare event.

Purposeful Pride said...

Lol, people who think calling TSA employees screeners or clerks is insulting forgot that they are screening clerks. Nothing more and nothing less.

If you feel shame for knowing or being a screening clerk, that's your ego talking. There is no shame in being a clerk. Any shame you should feel for being a TSA employee is from your willingness to touch people's breasts, buttocks, and genitals, confiscate non-dangerous private property, and take revealing images of them all for unnecessary, fake security at the cost of billions of dollars every year.

That is the real shame.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
Fixed it for you. TSA thinks large bottles of water are dangerous, too.

No, not really. Does nobody have common sence?

~~~~~~~~~

Why does the TSA prevent my bottle of water through security if they don't think it a danger? Are they in the habbit of just denying things from citizens simply because they think they the authority to do so?

TSAnonymous said...

Anonymous said...

"Why does the TSA prevent my bottle of water through security if they don't think it a danger? Are they in the habbit of just denying things from citizens simply because they think they the authority to do so?"

Yes.

Anonymous said...

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense. now you're even allowing college kids (kaydets) to endure more reasonable screening, but those who sacrificed for 20+ have to take their bloody shoes and belts off!! it's pretty clear that TSA doesn't understand risk assessment or risk-based anything, much less security.