Friday, January 23, 2015

TSA 2014 Year in Review



Infographic related to statistics stated in blog post.

Every day, transportation security officers interact with nearly two million travelers across the United States with a single goal in mind – ensuring the safety and security of the traveling public.

We want to share with you examples of the continued vigilance of TSA officers in protecting our nation’s transportation systems, including some of the most unusual items discovered at checkpoints.

TSA had a busy year in 2014, screening more than 653 million passengers in 2014 (about 1.8 million per day), which is 14.8 million more passengers than last year.

2,212 firearms were discovered in carry-on bags at checkpoints across the country, averaging more than six firearms per day. Of those, 1,835 (83 percent) were loaded. Firearms were intercepted at a total of 224 airports; 19 more airports than last year.

There was a 22 percent increase in firearm discoveries from last year’s total of 1,813.
 
These are just some of the 2,212 firearms discovered in carry-on bags in 2014.
These are just some of the 2,212 firearms discovered in carry-on bags in 2014.
Top 10 Airports for Gun Catches in 2014

  1. Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (DFW): 120
  2. Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport (ATL): 109
  3. Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport (PHX): 78
  4. George Bush Intercontinental Airport (IAH): 77
  5. Denver International Airport (DEN): 70
  6. William P. Hobby Airport (HOU): 50
  7. Tampa International Airport (TPA): 49
  8. Ft. Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport (FLL): 49
  9. Nashville International Airport (BNA): 48
  10. Orlando International Airport (MCO): 47
Here are a few of the more notable firearm incidents: 

A record number of firearms discovered in one day was set on June 4, 2014, when 18 firearms were discovered around the country in carry-on bags. That broke the previous record of 13 set in 2013.

A disassembled .22 caliber firearm was discovered in a carry-on bag at John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK). Various components of the gun were found hidden inside a PlayStation 2 console.
A disassembled .22 caliber firearm was discovered in a carry-on bag at John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK). Various components of the gun were found hidden inside a PlayStation 2 console.
An assault rifle with three loaded magazines was discovered at the Dallas Love Field (DAL) checkpoint.
An assault rifle with three loaded magazines was discovered at the Dallas Love Field (DAL) checkpoint.
A loaded folding-stock rifle with two loaded magazines was discovered in a carry-on bag at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (DFW).
A loaded folding-stock rifle with two loaded magazines was discovered in a carry-on bag at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (DFW).

A 94-year-old man attempted to enter the checkpoint at LaGuardia Airport (LGA) with a loaded .38 caliber revolver clipped to his belt.

A loaded 380. caliber firearm was discovered strapped to a passenger’s ankle after walking through a metal detector at Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport (CVG).

A loaded 380. caliber firearm was discovered in the rear pocket of a San Antonio International Airport (SAT) passenger during advanced imaging technology screening.
  
In addition to firearms discovered this year, there were many unsafe items that passengers attempted to travel with this year including: 

An Mk 2 hand grenade was discovered in a carry-on bag at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX). The Terminal 1 checkpoint was closed while the explosive ordnance disposal team transported the grenade to an offsite location to be disrupted. Five flights were delayed more than two hours, affecting 800 passengers.
An Mk 2 hand grenade was discovered in a carry-on bag at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX). The Terminal 1 checkpoint was closed while the explosive ordnance disposal team transported the grenade to an offsite location to be disrupted. Five flights were delayed more than two hours, affecting 800 passengers.
A homemade avalanche control charge was discovered in a carry-on bag at Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport (ANC). FBI responded and arrested the passenger.
A homemade avalanche control charge was discovered in a carry-on bag at Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport (ANC). FBI responded and arrested the passenger. 

A traveler at Gerald R. Ford International Airport-Grand Rapids (GRR) had a tube in his carry-on bag containing 500 grains of black powder. 

Other dangerous items discovered last year include: a fireworks making kit, fireworks, black powder pellets, live flash bang grenades, propane, a flare gun, seal deterrent, M-1000 fireworks, over 700 stun guns and live smoke grenades.

From the left: stun grenade (EVV), stun grenade (MEM), flare gun (AMA) and smoke grenade (SEA)
From the left: stun grenade (EVV), stun grenade (MEM), flare gun (AMA) and smoke grenade (SEA)

Officers also find inert items that appear very realistic. The problem with these types of items is that we don’t know if they are real, toys or replicas until TSA explosives experts are called upon. Inert items can lead to disruption, closed terminals and checkpoints, which often result in canceled or delayed flights. Here are some of the more interesting inert items found last year:
  
Six blocks of inert C-4 were discovered in a checked bag at Tampa (TPA).
Six blocks of inert C-4 were discovered in a checked bag at Tampa (TPA).
A novelty alarm clock resembling an explosive device was discovered in a carry-on bag at Kansas City (MCI).
A novelty alarm clock resembling an explosive device was discovered in a carry-on bag at Kansas City (MCI).
An improvised explosives device (IED) training kit was discovered in a checked bag at Honolulu (HNL).
An improvised explosives device (IED) training kit was discovered in a checked bag at Honolulu (HNL). 

A military training kit containing inert blasting caps, inert detonators, inert detonating cord and inert C-4 were discovered in a checked bag at Honolulu International Airport (HNL). The baggage room was evacuated causing a delay in screening.
 
Over 140 inert/novelty hand grenades were discovered last year in both checked and carry-on bags.
Over 140 inert/novelty hand grenades were discovered last year in both checked and carry-on bags.
A realistic replica of a Claymore anti-personnel mine was discovered in a traveler’s checked bag at San Francisco International Airport (SFO).
A realistic replica of a Claymore anti-personnel mine was discovered in a traveler’s checked bag at San Francisco International Airport (SFO).


An explosives training kit was discovered in a traveler’s checked bag at Northwest Florida Regional Airport (VPS).

Other inert items were discovered last year including: inert artillery shells, an M18A1 mine kit, an inert military explosives training kit, 40mm grenade launcher practice rounds, an inert training warhead, and a WWII blasting machine.

Inert Ordnance
 From the left, items discovered at: CVG, SEA, SAN, and ATL

There were many instances last year when travelers attempted to hide items, or the items they packed were disguised to look like other items. TSA officers regularly find sword canes, credit card knives, belt buckle knives, comb/brush knives, knives hidden in shoes, knives hidden in thermoses and knives hidden under the bag lining near the handle mechanism. Here are a few instances that stood out: 

An anomaly was detected with advanced imaging technology in the center chest area of a Philadelphia International Airport (PHL) passenger. After a pat-down, a pen and highlighter combo was discovered to be concealing small knives.
An anomaly was detected with advanced imaging technology in the center chest area of a Philadelphia International Airport (PHL) passenger. After a pat-down, a pen and highlighter combo was discovered to be concealing small knives.

An 8.5” knife was discovered in an enchilada at the Charles M. Schulz–Sonoma County Airport (STS).
An 8.5” knife was discovered in an enchilada at the Charles M. Schulz–Sonoma County Airport (STS). 

Razorblades were discovered concealed in a greeting card at Newport News/Williamsburg International Airport (PHF).
Razorblades were discovered concealed in a greeting card at Newport News/Williamsburg International Airport (PHF).

A multi-tool/knife was detected concealed inside the water chamber of a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machine at San Antonio International Airport (SAT).

When officers at John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK) opened a checked bag for a routine inspection, they discovered many household items, like baby wipes, coffee, lemonade mix and a box of cat litter. After a closer look, they found two disassembled .40 caliber handguns, 350 rounds of ammunition, and 58 bricks of marijuana (33 pounds) concealed in the products. The traveler was arrested on state charges by the Port Authority Police Department.
When officers at John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK) opened a checked bag for a routine inspection, they discovered many household items, like baby wipes, coffee, lemonade mix and a box of cat litter. After a closer look, they found two disassembled .40 caliber handguns, 350 rounds of ammunition, and 58 bricks of marijuana (33 pounds) concealed in the products. The traveler was arrested on state charges by the Port Authority Police Department.

A three-inch knife was found concealed inside of a laptop’s hard drive caddy at Dayton International Airport (DAY).
A three-inch knife was found concealed inside of a laptop’s hard drive caddy at Dayton International Airport (DAY).


Many other concealed items were discovered last year including: a stun cane, a razorblade in a cell phone, a saw blade in a bible, a cell phone knife case, a lipstick stun gun, a knife concealed in a tube of toothpaste, a knife under the sole of a shoe, pen knives, a pocket knife in a potato chip bag, knife keys, a knife in a neck pillow, a lipstick knife, two rounds of .22 caliber ammo sewn into a shirt cuff, a machete concealed under the lining of bag, and a round of .22 caliber ammo in a tube of medical cream.

Clockwise from top left, items discovered at: BIL, BGM, MIA, DTW, LAX & BOS
Clockwise from top left, items discovered at: BIL, BGM, MIA, DTW, LAX & BOS

These are examples of some of the more common artfully concealed items our officers find.
These are examples of some of the more common artfully concealed items our officers find.

While TSA works to keep dangerous items off of commercial aircraft, when contraband is found, it must be reported to local law enforcement. Here are a few of the more notable narcotics discoveries:


80 pounds of marijuana was discovered in a checked bag at the McClellan-Palomar Airport (CLD) in California.
80 pounds of marijuana was discovered in a checked bag at the McClellan-Palomar Airport (CLD) in California.

81 Pounds of Marijuana was discovered in checked baggage at the Oakland International Airport (OAK).  

92 pounds of marijuana was discovered in a checked bag at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport (PHX). 

A San Jose International Airport (SJC) passenger was arrested after nearly three pounds of cocaine was discovered in his checked baggage wrapped inside a package of raw meat.
A San Jose International Airport (SJC) passenger was arrested after nearly three pounds of cocaine was discovered in his checked baggage wrapped inside a package of raw meat.

A plastic bag containing 67 pills hidden inside of a hollowed out textbook was discovered in checked baggage at Philadelphia International Airport (PHL).
A plastic bag containing 67 pills hidden inside of a hollowed out textbook was discovered in checked baggage at Philadelphia International Airport (PHL).

18 bags of heroin were discovered on the leg of an Atlantic City International Airport (ACY) passenger during advanced imaging technology screening. 


The year also provided the need for travelers to surrender a few odd items:

An unloaded cannon barrel was discovered with a passenger’s checked items at the Kahului Airport (OGG).
An unloaded cannon barrel was discovered with a passenger’s checked items at the Kahului Airport (OGG). 



Prohibited items.
Clockwise from top left, items discovered at: MDW, BUF, DEN, PHX, EWR, MKE, BTV and SLC

A selection of throwing knives and stars our officers discovered in 2014
A selection of throwing knives and stars our officers discovered in 2014

Some of the knives and swords our officers discovered in 2014
Some of the knives and swords our officers discovered in 2014
2014 was also a great year for TSA Pre✓®! Be sure to read our blog post reflecting on risk-based security last year. 


Thanks for reading this year’s run down of the more notable items TSA officers discovered in 2014. Keep in mind that far more was discovered than those listed in this report. When bag searches are needed, the line slows down. If you haven’t read them yet, make sure you check out our year in review posts for 2011, 2012 & 2013


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Bob Burns
TSA Blog Team 

If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer; you can contact us by clicking here.

91 comments:

RB said...

Did this list of guns include the 153 guns that alluded every layer of TSA security at ATL?

http://www.cnn.com/2014/12/23/us/delta-employee-gun-smuggling/

"In total, 153 guns were recovered as part of a complex investigation that Thompson outlined by using charts and surveillance video during a press conference in New York."

Anonymous said...

all those guns, and not a single one had anything to do with terrorism, and not a single one was a legitimate threat to aviation security. what a waste of tax dollars and time.

Anonymous said...

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense. now you're even allowing college kids (kaydets) to endure more reasonable screening, but those who served and sacrificed for 20+ have to take their bloody shoes and belts off!!

TSA Security Fail said...

TSA shows in the graphic at the top of this post how they interdicted 109 guns at ATL. We know from news reports that TSA and its many layers of security failed to interdict 153 weapons carried in by an airport employee.

So the 70% figure from published Red Teams tests may in fact be wrong.

If this case is an indication of TSA's competence then TSA is missing more than 50% of all weapons entering the sterile area.

Bill Gray said...

What's the problem with the pills found in a book? I carry a weeks worth of my medications with me.

Susan Richart said...

Why waste keystrokes/time with pictures of and commentary on items that are not the least bit of a threat to any plane or passenger?

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

C. Michael McCaleb said...

Thank you for your work...and thank you for the blog...these are scary times, I am glad you and the rest of the TSA teams are working for the safety of the public...keep up the good work.

C. M. McCaleb

Anonymous said...

Absolutely fascinating. Now I can see why my (new) tube of toothpaste (recently prescribed by my dentist) was confiscated, though it was returned after it had been x-rayed. Thanks TSA for helping to keep us ordinary travelers safe.

Kevin said...

What percentage of these travelers are prosecuted for some offense relating to terrorism? If few or none, why are people bringing these things on board, or trying to?

Anonymous said...

I had no idea the TSA actually found things like guns and explosives. That's crazy!

Mike Porter said...

It is hard to believe the mindset of people who carry these items much less attempt to board aircraft with them. I am so thankful for the TSA's vigilance.

Truth said...

Whether or not these people carried their loaded firearms through an airport security check on accident or on purpose, is there any better example of the fact that it is too easy for careless people and people with poor judgment to obtain guns in this country? I am all for the right of responsible people to own guns, but clearly that is not happening in this country these days.

Jack said...

The propaganda is strong with this one.

Anonymous said...

TIL 400 TSA agents have been arrested for theft of passenger items while not one terrorist has been caught.

http://rt.com/usa/tsa-stealing-from-travelers-358/

Anonymous said...

I am all for the TSA and the difficult work it does protecting us and dealing with the massive numbers of flights and all kinds of potential dangers.

So firstly thank you for your difficult and important work. Too many in the public interact with TSA during travel stress and TSA is under appreciated and target of criticism it does not deserve.

That said, this data would be more helpful if you could enumerate how many of these firearms are loaded and how many are inadvertent carries by law enforcement personnel.

I also think it is important that you note that:
a) millions of responsible US firearms owners DO travel by airplane with properly secured and stored firearms and ammunition in checked luggage; and
b) in the recent past airlines and even the TSA have given out problematically confused or even incorrect information I was told by the TSA on the phone to use a "TSA-approved" lock, and then at the airport told by the TSA that I had to use any lock EXCEPT a TSA-approved lock because TSA should not be able to open the gun case in my checked luggage without me present!

Anonymous said...

I cannot resist one comment: it is distressingly obvious that many people do not know how an x-ray machine works.

GigOne said...

It would be great if you would include how many arrests were involved.

Chris Boyce said...

You must be really proud of your drug busts. No problem with that pesky Constitution thing.

jamie said...

"2,212 firearms were discovered in carry-on bags at checkpoints across the country, averaging more than six firearms per day. Of those, 2,212 (83 percent) were loaded."

Sure - this sentence makes loads of sense...

Anonymous said...

"Assault rifle"??? Please.

Unless it was a real, full-automatic machine gun it was just a regular sporting gun.

Anonymous said...

Please post your evidence that not a single weapon was planned for terrorism...Oh, that is impossible? Then stop making claims.

Anonymous said...

Not a threat? Seriously? You do realize if a passenger was to fire a gun inside the cabin at a high altitude (which is pressurized) the plane would be ripped apart.

Anonymous said...

Even if these threats were real (do you really think someone is going to take down a jetliner with a whip?), The bad guys now have a study guide to use if they really want to get something through security.

All told, the TSA should be embarrassed by this article.

Anonymous said...

Propaganda in it's purest form. That's all this is.

Counting Blue Guns said...

Oh, you were so busy playing with PhotoshopExpress, that's why you couldn't bother to approve comments this week.

683,000,000 people flew.

2,212 guns found.

Assuming each gun was found on a different person, that means that .0003% of passengers was caught carrying a gun into a screening area over the past 365 days.

Not statistically significant or even interesting.

Strange that the blotter team didn't mention the 5,161 guns that they didn't find and made it through the screening area. And the fact that none of those guns were used to attack a plane.

We know you want to terrify the American public to keep DHS funding and your jobs, but you failed again, blotter team.

Counting Blue Toys said...

"Over 140 INERT/NOVELTY hand grenades" as well as the TOY and PERFUME BOTTLE hand grenades were confiscated by TSA screeners.

Absolutely NONE of these objects had ANY chance of being an explosive. They were NOT REAL.

Also, you need to list how many millions of items the TSA confiscates that are NOT WEI (weapons, explosives, and incendiaries).

Water
Soft drinks
Juice
Hair care products
Perfume
Lotions
Tools
Locks
USB drives
Keychains
Nail care items
Small pocketknives
Toys
Bottle openers
Cutlery
Clothes
Knickknacks
Memorabilia
Jams and Jelly
Peanut Butter
Pastries & desserts
Yogurt
Condiments

Anonymous said...

DoD civilians are now included in the TSA PreCheck program: http://www.defensetravel.dod.mil/site/news.cfm?ID=18

As far as qualifying for precheck just on the basis of retiree status, I don't think that will or ever should come to pass. While retirees do receive a number of DoD benefits, they are not being actively investigated and a lot can change in a persons life after their service.

ACM said...

“all those guns, and not a single one had anything to do with terrorism, and not a single one was a legitimate threat to aviation security. what a waste of tax dollars and time.”

Guns and knives aren't legitimate threats to aviation security? Are you mad? As a passenger, these are precisely the things I, and any reasonable person, would consider to be the biggest threats to aviation security.

TSORon said...

Wow, a busy year!

Anonymous said...

Amen!!! We need to abolish the TSA.

Mike Toreno said...

Clerk McCaleb, these are scary times if you're very easily scared. Does it scare you knowing that you and your fellow clerks missed about 7500 guns last year? How do you explain the fact that none of those guns was used, or even brought out, on an aircraft?

SSSS for Some Reason said...

OMG! An average of six firearms a day! And out of 2 million passengers each day!

Too bad you don't have any terrorists attached to a single one of those firearms.

I do have two questions for you....

That Canon you inspected.... did it fly? You never did answer the original question.

The gun smuggling.... were those numbers counted in your 6 a day?

Anonymous said...

tsa's job is not to catch terrorists, its job is to stop weapons, explosives, and incendiaries from getting on airplanes.

Anonymous said...

It would be great if you would include how many arrests were involved.

Airport Law Enforcement would track arrests, not TSA (as they don't make arrests).

Anonymous said...

Chris Boyce said...
You must be really proud of your drug busts. No problem with that pesky Constitution thing.

January 23, 2015 at 9:40 PM
----------------------------
Nope. None at all. TSA simply reports illegal items discovered in the course of screening to Police. If they arrest, that's up to them.
Look up administrative search.

Anonymous said...

How many people had to be physically searched by TSA screeners thanks to false alarms from your slow, invasive, and dangerous naked body scanners?

Why are Curtis Burns and West Cooper too cowardly to answer this simple, direct, and legitimate question about TSA's primary screening technology?

Anonymous said...

Anonymous Anonymous said... You do realize if a passenger was to fire a gun inside the cabin at a high altitude (which is pressurized) the plane would be ripped apart.

No. It wouldn't. That only happens in the movies.

You would not be sucked out through a bullet hole, the cabin wouldn't explode outwards destroying anything, and the odds of a bullet hitting anything important on its way out of the aircraft are very incredibly small. And, no, not even if it went into the gas tanks on the wing because they are designed to not blow up when punctured even if by a bullet.

Let me turn your question around..... You do realize that there is already a hole in the cabin that is about the size of silver dollar and all that air in the cabin is constantly being let out even when at altitude? That pressure release port is already much bigger than any hole you could make with a firearm.

Anonymous said...

"Please post your evidence that not a single weapon was planned for terrorism...Oh, that is impossible?"

All TSA has to do is identify which weapon-bearers were arrested on terrorism charges. TSA has not crowed about any such arrests, nor have the media covered it, which would indicate that no such arrests have been made. Simple.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
Please post your evidence that not a single weapon was planned for terrorism...Oh, that is impossible? Then stop making claims.

Once again you get it exactly backwards.

You prove their guilt, not they their innocence.

You prove they were terrorists and your actions were justified.

Anonymous said...

1. How exactly would someone hijack a plane with an unloaded cannon? Or a whip?
2. I'd *really* like to see statistics on how many thousands of gallons of shampoo, conditioner, body lotion, breast milk, and bottled water the TSA have saved us from.
3. Also, nail clippers.

Susan Richart said...

Counting Blue Toys wrote:

"Over 140 INERT/NOVELTY hand grenades" as well as the TOY and PERFUME BOTTLE hand grenades were confiscated by TSA screeners."

And yet the TSA states that "Realistic replicas" are forbidden. A toy gun, 2" long is a realistic replica? A glass perfume bottle is a realistic replica? A decoration on a purse is a realistic replica?

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Bill Bennett said...

There are rules for traveling on commercial airlines. If you don't like them either use another mode of transportation or stay at home. If you choose to not obey the rules then don't complain when they come back to bite you. Your not the special flower you think you are.

Air Rifle said...

It is hard to believe the mindset of people who carry these items much less attempt to board aircraft with them. I am so thankful for the TSA's vigilance

Anonymous said...

all those guns, and not a single one had anything to do with terrorism, and not a single one was a legitimate threat to aviation security. what a waste of tax dollars and time.

The absolute rediculousness of some of these comments amazes me. How do you know there was no threat? When questioned, a POTENTAIL terrorist doesnt say, oh, by the way, Im a terrorist. Also keep in mind, TSA does not look for terrorists. They look for threat iteams. Their job is to keep threat iteams off of planes. Nowhere does it say they are looking for terrorists.
That said, iteams dont have to be "live" to be a threat. What happens if somoeone pulls a fake grenade or that bomb looking alarm clock out of his bag at 30,000 feet? Pandimonium is the answer. Some of you people are so in the dark as to the threats facing this country and what is going on to prevent it. Had the 9/11 highjackers had their box cutters taken by TSA, nobody would have ever known they exsisted and you fools would be questioning why they took a box cutter from a person who was not a threat. of the thousands of iteams taken, if only one was taken from a terrorist, thousands of lives would have been saved by TSA. If only one threat iteam was not taken on board because TSA was a detourant, thousands of lives may have been saved.
You whinners can cry all you want and post usless and usless garbage about things not being a threat. Fact is, you know not of which you speak. I prefer to think that perhaps, TSA has prevent thousands of un needed deaths.
Thanks TSA for all you do and for putting up with the publics needless beat-down.

Anonymous said...

"There are rules for traveling on commercial airlines"

Yes, Bill, and many of those rules are nonsensical (the shoe carnival, unreplicated anywhere else on the planet), irrational (the farcical liquids ban), or based on junk science (utterly discredited "behavior detection"), while the means TSA uses to enforce these rules (such as naked body scanners) are slow, invasive, and ineffective, and were not implemented according to OTHER rules about how federal agencies must put new regulations into place.

Anonymous said...

Sometimes this is just too sad. My dad served in the South Pacific during WWII, was a Marine Raider until they were disbanded and his unit was moved to the 6th Marine Division. He was wounded at Okinawa then was part of Task Force 31 the Marines who went ashore in Tokyo Harbor before the signing of the peace treaty. I went with him on his last trip (while he was dying from cancer). Even wearing his USMC Raider jacket, WWII Veteran cap, and a Raider belt buckle and having a card that said he had both shrapnel in his arm and an artificial hip, the TSA pulled him out of line. How an 86 year old veteran, who couldn't walk anymore, was a threat to national security I'll never know. This was done in every single airport.

Anonymous said...

What complete nonsense. I agree with many other comments, this is nothing more than a propaganda hype. TSA needs to justify their existance to the tax payers and homeland security needs to scare the public into giving up their rights.

Benny William said...

Hey Bill Bennett,

The government has rules we disagree with. Our gov't is wasting tax dollars, not keeping anyone safer, wrongly confiscating private propeety, and violating our bodies with intrusive scanners and molesting gropes.

American citizens have the right and responsibility to speak up and non-violently resist these actions by gov't employees. The gov't serves US. We are not here to be silently oppressed and violated at the whim of arrogant and occasionally mentally disturbed gov't employees.

(Before you freak out about the "mentally disturbed" comment, West and Bill, remember the LA TSA screener who made inappropriate comments to a teenage girl, then called in a fake threat. This comment does not violate blotter policy.)

Anonymous said...

What exactly was the threat supposedly posed by an unloaded replica or antique black-powder cannon? Did you guys anticipate sky pirates or something?

All you managed by that was to ruin someone's fun -- not least because, as an unloaded firearm (of sorts) it's not even prohibited in checked bags!

You continue to not-impress.

Anonymous said...

Air Rifle said...
"It is hard to believe the mindset of people who carry these items much less attempt to board aircraft with them. I am so thankful for the TSA's vigilance"

Yes... One wonders what someone might want to do with a bottle of water on the airplane! Thanks, TSA, for keeping us safe from bottled water!

Anonymous said...

How do you know what the guns, grenades etc that was caught was not intended to be an act of terrorism? You don't but the fact they were caught gives a sense of peace that I won't be on the plane with these people and their weapons. Your comments is ridiculous because why would anyone want to bring these things on an aircraft in the first place?

Anonymous said...

The TSA's year in review should include how TSA employees, all the way up to former Admin Pistole ignored the Office of Inspector General for months in its "Audit of Security Controls for DHS Information Systems at John F. Kennedy International Airport".

http://www.oig.dhs.gov/assets/Mgmt/2015/OIG_15-18_Jan14.pdf

John Roth, the Inspector General, says, in part, in his opening letter,

"- We provided a draft of this report on July 22, 2014 to the Chief Information Officer for review. Pursuant to Department of Homeland Security Directive 077-01, Follow-up, and Resolution for Office of Inspector General Report Recommendations, we asked for agency comments, including a sensitivity review, within 30 days of receipt of the draft. This would have made the report due on or about August 22, 2014. Almost a week later, on August 27, 2014, the DHS Chief of Staff requested an extension to provide a response and technical comments. I granted the extension until September 17, 2014.

- On October 20, 2014, nearly 60 days after the original due date for agency comments, the Departmental GAO-OIG Liaison Office finally conveyed to us TSA's response to our request for a
sensitivity review by marking several passages in the report as SSI. I disagree with this determination.

- On November 19, 2014, I sent a formal challenge memo to TSA Administrator John Pistole expressing my disagreement. Administrator Pistole had authority over all TSA programs and operations, including oversight of the SSI programs, and is my counterpart in DHS' leadership.

- Having received no reply, on December 16, 2014, I wrote to Administrator Pistole a second time, noting that this report had languished as a result of TSA's sensitivity review, and again requesting that he remove the SSI deletions from the report. As with the November 19, 2014 letter, I received no reply.

- Finally, on January 13, 2015, over five months after submitting the report for sensitivity review, and two months after writing to Administrator Pistole, I received a decision, not from the Acting TSA Administrator, but from the head of the SSI program office - the very same office that initially and improperly marked the information as SSI. Not surprisingly, the office affirmed its original
redaction to the report."

Not a very good 2014 for the TSA if they can't even review one report in five months.

Anonymous said...

I would guess that most, a very high percentage, of the guns confiscated were those that conceal carry. It's not hard to "forget" about your carry gun when it's on your hip at all times.

I don't think this makes it acceptable that they forgot to remove it before going to the airport... but I understand it. Especially with the explosion of concealed carry permits being issued these days.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
"How do you know what the guns, grenades etc that was caught was not intended to be an act of terrorism?"

TSA has a failure rate of ~70%. That means considerably more flew than were caught. Ergo, if anyone were targeting commercial aviation, then an act of terrorism would have occurred by now. The fact that one hasn't proves the point.

Anonymous said...

"Pandimonium is the answer."

Is that a new addition to the periodic table?

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
all those guns, and not a single one had anything to do with terrorism, and not a single one was a legitimate threat to aviation security. what a waste of tax dollars and time.

The absolute rediculousness of some of these comments amazes me. How do you know there was no threat? When questioned, a POTENTAIL terrorist doesnt say, oh, by the way, Im a terrorist. Also keep in mind, TSA does not look for terrorists. They look for threat iteams. Their job is to keep threat iteams off of planes. Nowhere does it say they are looking for terrorists.
That said, iteams dont have to be "live" to be a threat. What happens if somoeone pulls a fake grenade or that bomb looking alarm clock out of his bag at 30,000 feet? Pandimonium is the answer. Some of you people are so in the dark as to the threats facing this country and what is going on to prevent it. Had the 9/11 highjackers had their box cutters taken by TSA, nobody would have ever known they exsisted and you fools would be questioning why they took a box cutter from a person who was not a threat. of the thousands of iteams taken, if only one was taken from a terrorist, thousands of lives would have been saved by TSA. If only one threat iteam was not taken on board because TSA was a detourant, thousands of lives may have been saved.
You whinners can cry all you want and post usless and usless garbage about things not being a threat. Fact is, you know not of which you speak. I prefer to think that perhaps, TSA has prevent thousands of un needed deaths.
Thanks TSA for all you do and for putting up with the publics needless beat-down.

January 27, 2015 at 10:13 AM
---------------------------------
I know because for every item found, at least 2 others made it through, according to TSA's own testing stats. you can prefer to think whatever you wish, it is a putatively free country, but that doesn't make it so. there were more than enough prohibited items on planes on which you have flown to enable a terrorist act. none have occurred. thus, this is an artificially enlarged threat. thanks to TSA for nothing but wasting our time and tax dollars without protecting us in any signficant way.

Anonymous said...

Please continue your good work and disregard all the negative comments by people who don't know what this is all about.
Retired Airline Captain.

Anonymous said...

Oh please enlighten us, "Retired Airline Captain!"

It isn't like we've researched the subject at all.

It isn't like we've watched the actions of the TSA for years.

It isn't like we requested information and transparency for years, all to be ignored.

It isn't like we know our rights.

So, please, provide some proof that you're a "Retired Airline Pilot" and give us some verifiable facts and information.

Lindsay said...

I cant believe I didnt know this blog existed. I've always wondered how many items are found trying to go through security.I have to say, the US is pretty great in regards to making information like this public (just like they do the sex offender registry). Here's hoping Canada will be a little more open to publishing this type of thing too. THANK YOU!

Wagner said...

Lindsay, this blotter display is inaccurate at best and deceptive at worst.

7 weapons get through TSA screening areas for every 3 three find.

This blotter never covers the millions of non-dangerous items confiscated by screeners every year.

This blotter does not cover but a fraction of a percent of the abuses and wrongdoings by TSA employees.

This blotter team does not respond to questions posed by US citizens and deletes comments that meet blotter policy.

This blotter is a weak propaganda scheme that has failed since its inception.

Anonymous said...

You used the same images multiple times in your montages of weapons allegedly found by screeners.

Fake photos = fake statistics = lies by the TSA Blog Team.

Unknown said...

So, what's the deal with the cannon? Are unloaded cannons allowed in checked baggage? I don't see how they could possibly be a threat (it's just a hunk of metal), although I could see how it might be hard to tell whether there is any explosive powder inside.

Anonymous said...

you don't seem to know what would happen if a gun was fired in an airplane so I'm about to get all science on you.the difference in cabin pressure in the outside of the plane at 30,000 feet is 8 psi a small hole placed in the plane from a gunshot would not be sufficient enough to cause explosive decompression. and the hole could be plugged up with anything that can survive 8 pounds of pressure. There for seriously no threat

Anonymous said...

Here is some quick evidence not a single person who owns any of those guns was charged with terrorism and most of them didn't even do jail time and got their guns back

Anonymous said...

Who would of thought the TSA has no idea what the phrase "assault weapon" means

Anonymous said...

Via molesting people

Jim G. said...

Since 2006, the number of guns discovered by the TSA has increased more than threefold. Assuming that the number of people carrying guns has not changed substantially, then that should correspond to a huge decrease in gun violence aboard aircraft. How many gun-related incidents have there been aboard US aircraft in the last ten years? I can't find any. Maybe the TSA could provide those numbers? If in fact the risk of gun violence has been reduced to zero from zero, I don't see the value in increased security measures.

Jean-Paul Shindler said...

Having worked along side the TSA , I can only commend them on their professionalism. Dealing with the (ignorant, uninformed, rude, pushy, egotistical, demanding, I could go on) general public as they do every day, they show patience that is beyond belief. People who knock TSA just are not aware of the world around them. Keep up the good work TSA, there are people who are glad You are here and appreciate you.

Shoe Organizer said...

I like to do year end reviews of lore we've seen in the past year, but this year's review is going to be a little odd.

Holly B. said...

I believe that the security in airports should continue to the be strict and over cautious. You just never know who might be carrying a bomb or illegal substances. Although I do believe this article uses the Conjunction fallacy because which of the two events is more likely to happen within the next year at an airport:
1. A person tries to bring a bomb on a plane
2. a person tried to bring a bomb and a plane and ends up overtaking the whole plane and crashing it into the white house causing another terrorist attack, like 9/11. The probability of a conjunction is never greater than the probability of its conjuncts. In other words, the probability of two things being true can never be greater than the probability of one of them being true, since in order for both to be true, each must be true. However, when people are asked to compare the probabilities of a conjunction and one of its conjuncts, they sometimes judge that the conjunction is more likely than one of its conjuncts. This seems to happen when the conjunction suggests a scenario that is more easily imagined than the conjunct alone. This article implies a lot of that type of thing but overall I agree with everything and think the United States is doing a great job on keeping our country safe and out of harms way.

Sean Devlin said...

Maybe you'd find more contraband if you didn't allow everyone, their dog and monkey thought TSA Pre-Check. So glad I paid for the privilege. Literally no one in the general lanes this morning at SEA. 50+ in another lane. I'll let you guess which.

dussel said...

it would be interesting to know how passengers were counted: according to the department of transportation's bureau of statistics (http://www.transtats.bts.gov/Data_Elements.aspx?Data=1), there were 663M domestic and 187M international passengers in 2014 - the number quoted on this blog (653M screened passengers) doesn't seem to match those from the DoT. How come? Also: it would be interesting to see a break-down of the prohibited items found by domestic vs. international travel: a very crude comparison, by reading off the number of guns found by year from this (TSA) blog, and the corresponding passenger counts from the DoT website, summarized by year, show no correlation between guns found each year and domestic passenger count, but a correlation of 97% in guns found in a given year, and the number of international passengers. Not suggesting causation of any kind, likely just a confounding factor, but curious non the less. Mostly about how the numbers between the two sites are so far, though.

Tracy said...

It is hard to believe the mindset of people who carry these items much less attempt to board aircraft with them. They're dangerous. I am so thankful for the TSA's vigilance.

Myra Timas said...

How are we molesting people? Are you mad, if you would read your history on attacks that were attempted to be made to aviation, you would see why we do the things we do. It is not for fun or any stupid reason to be able to touch passengers, it is to make sure that they aren't hiding any explosives, weapons, or any prohibited items on their person.

mpg414 said...

The men and women of the TSA do an incredible job. Thank you for keep us safe and making airline travel the safest form of transportation. Gun free zones work when administered properly.

Mike G.

Ps: Former member of 2/502nd Inf. 101st Abn.

Tony said...

Thanks to this article, I know the mission of TSA. Thank TSA

Anonymous said...

I'd still like TSA to respond and tell me what the problem was with the pills in the book. Are we not allowed to carry on medications & over-the-counter remedies? I carry enough medications with me, usually in a carry on, for length of my trip.

If the problem is that the medications are not in each of their own Rx bottles, that would be a totally unrealistic policy. I have some serious medical conditions requiring a number of medications plus I choose to take calcium, vitamins, etc. I'd have to pack a shoe box full of bottles.

Myra Timas said...

Hello, depending on how thick your book was makes the picture look funny and dark on the xray and with having pills in the boom might have given the operator a sense of urgency to check it out and make sure that it was not anything that could bring down our planes.so quite frankly it iS not the fact that it wasn't in its own bottle we look at things differently on the xray.we taking security very seriously.I hope this helped you with your question.

Anonymous said...

Did the guy with the bomb-clock get invited to the White House and sue for $15million?

Anonymous said...

At the very least the idiots who try to carry this stuff on planes should be banned from ever flying. Boggles the mind. Thanks TSA,

Mattress Topper said...

TSA is doing a great job here, you should give them some respect instead of whining. Keep up the good work

Doris Graham said...

Great guns and grenades! They are really powerful and good for the armies of a country to protect the motherland!

Jimmy said...

Woaw, really surprise a lot of guns. Thanks for the detail reviews of the TSA.

John said...

I can not believe too many guns. Thanks for reviews of TSA.

Sydney Brooke said...

Great work by LA explosive ordnance disposal team. Proud of them .

Supra said...

If the problem is that the medications are not in each of their own Rx bottles, that would be a totally unrealistic policy. I have some serious medical conditions requiring a number of medications plus I choose to take calcium, vitamins, etc.

ruslan angell said...

Keep up the good work TSA

Tom said...

I sometimes don't like having to deal with the TSA when going through airport security and then I think "wait, these guys are trying to save my life" Keep up the good work guys, I know its not hard but looking at all this stuff I definitely think a thank you is in order.

Park son said...

TSA is doing a great job here, you should give them some respect instead of whining. Keep up the good work

CamHi said...

Absolutely fascinating. Now I can see why my (new) tube of toothpaste (recently prescribed by my dentist) was confiscated, though it was returned after it had been x-rayed. Thanks TSA for helping to keep us ordinary travelers safe.

Anonymous said...

Thousands of people certainly have no intention of shooting people with their guns. But maybe 1 in 1000 do. Trying to stop a hijacker with a gun would be very difficult. So the more guns the TSA prevents from getting on the plane, the better.