Thursday, January 15, 2015

Reflections on Risk-based Security in 2014


While 2014 was a year that saw the retirement of TSA Administrator John S. Pistole, who left government service after 31 years of public service, his vision of risk-based, intelligence-driven programs introduced under his leadership will carry on.

TSA Pre✓®, a world renowned and highly effective risk-based security initiative continues to evolve. In 2014, for example, the agency added 120 new TSA Pre✓® lanes and began new TSA Pre✓® operations at 11 airports. Today, TSA Pre✓® is operational at more than 600 lanes at 124 U.S. airports. TSA Pre✓® allows select flyers to leave on their shoes, light outerwear, and belt, keep their laptop in its case and keep 3-1-1 compliant liquids/gels in a carry-on bag.

TSA Precheck infographic (Numbers coincide with info in post. 
TSA Pre® application center openings

To date, more than 800,000 travelers have enrolled in TSA Pre✓® since the first application center opened in 2013 at Indianapolis International Airport, allowing U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents the ability to directly apply for TSA Pre✓® benefits. Today, more than 330 application centers are available nationwide and 34 reside at airports, making it even more convenient to apply. 

TSA Pre® expands to four U.S. service academies

As the result of the ongoing partnership with the Department of Defense, TSA extended TSA Pre✓® expedited screening benefits to students of four U.S. service academies, the Military Academy, Naval Academy, Coast Guard Academy and the Air Force Academy. 

First international carrier joins TSA Pre®

TSA also extended TSA Pre✓® benefits to eligible customers of Air Canada, the first international carrier to participate in the popular expedited security screening initiative. TSA is working with additional international carriers to join TSA Pre✓®.

This shift from a “one-size-fits-all” approach to aviation security is best described by former Administrator Pistole in his final blog post on the evolution of TSA risk-based security.

More than 276 million travelers received some form of expedited screening in 2014. Through initiatives like TSA Pre✓®, TSA is working to improve the effectiveness of aviation security while greatly improving the travel experience. 

TSA Blog Team 
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19 comments:

Day Customs Consulting LLC said...

Congrats---US Customs/CBP has been successfully
using risk based security since the early 1980s.

SSSS for Some Reason said...

"...This shift from a “one-size-fits-all” approach to aviation security is best described by former Administrator Pistole in his final blog post on the evolution of TSA risk-based security."

So everyone EXCEPT the people who paid to be in Pre-Check are one size, everyone who did pay is the other size. I guess, technically, that is a shift away from the one-size metaphor.

I am still unclear, however, on how someone paying the application fee becomes 'more' safe in the eyes of the TSA. "Back in the day" that was called protection money and was considered racketeering and you could go to jail if caught.

Anonymous said...

Please note that there was no reference to the expansion of NOS/gropes to PreCheck lines. Why was that not mentioned?

RB said...

Still only a little over 25% of airports have Pre Check. No excuse to not have this service in every airport.

Also, not mentioned is the fact that TSA is busy bringing Strip Search Machines to Pre Check lanes greatly reducting any value (or time savings).

Leave it TSA to take a good concept and then turn it into compost.

The Truth Is Not TSA said...

ROTFLMAO! Precheck exhortion with limited and ever-reduced value.

Don't waste your time, money out privacy on this boondoggle. The TSA is eroding every benefit your $85 and privacy allegedly bought.

The Truth Is Not TSA said...

You seriously only had 4000 people signed for this pathetic program in Dec 2013?

Lisa Simeone said...

"TSA Pre✓®, a world renowned and highly effective risk-based security initiative"

Ha ha ha ha ha! Thanks for the laugh!

Adrian said...

PreCheck has absolutely nothing to do with risk-based security. There is no data that can be ascertained in a PreCheck background check that can give a statistically significant indicator as to whether the applicant is more or less of a security risk.

PreCheck is a sham to placate the politically influential who might otherwise apply some real scrutiny to the TSA and scale back its little empire.

And, in several ways, PreCheck and they way that the unconstitutional no-fly list is implemented actually make us less safe in several ways.

Susan Richart said...

According to this thread:

"To date, more than 800,000 travelers have enrolled in TSA Pre✓® since the first application center opened in 2013 at Indianapolis International Airport, allowing U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents the ability to directly apply for TSA Pre✓® benefits."

Back in October of 2014, Pistole said:

"Of the more than 2 million people who undergo TSA screening every day, more than 400,000 have signed up for Pre-Check, and 120 airports now offer Pre-Check expedited boarding lanes."

You expect us to believe that 400,000 have signed up for Pre-Check in the last 4 months? Snort!

From the Wall Street Journal:

"Currently 598,184 people are enrolled in PreCheck and more than 1.3 million more have PreCheck clearance through Global Entry, the Customs and Border Protection trusted-traveler program. TSA needs millions more enrolled to make sure PreCheck lines are fully used."

Something tells me that there are not "millions more" gullible people willing to hand over $85 to still be subjected to being groped or forced through the NoS.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Susan Richart said...

I neglected to ask in my previous comment if anybody at the TSA knows how many people are enrolled in PreCheck?

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Susan Richart said...

More on PreCheck:

"You know those PreCheck lanes at the airport that promise expedited screening? The TSA wants to fill them and it has come up with a troubling new twist on an old, contentious scheme to do it. While Congress and the rest of us were slipping out for the holidays, the TSA quietly published its intent to hire big data companies to solicit you for PreCheck enrollment, and seek your consent to mine your grocery receipts, your credit card purchases, and even your Facebook posts to determine if you are a terrorist risk – not just once but on an ongoing basis.

...The government has concluded that low participation rates in the expedited airport screening program known as PreCheck must be due to poor marketing and slow enrollment, as opposed to the flying public recognizing a bad deal when they see it."

http://tinyurl.com/lh48glf

Double Snort!

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

RB said...

You know those PreCheck lanes at the airport that promise expedited screening?  The TSA wants to fill them and it has come up with a troubling new twist on an old, contentious scheme to do it.  While Congress and the rest of us were slipping out for the holidays, the TSA quietly published its intent to hire big data companies to solicit you for PreCheck enrollment, and seek your consent to mine your grocery receipts, your credit card purchases, and even your Facebook posts to determine if you are a terrorist risk – not just once but on an ongoing basis. 



http://thehill.com/blogs/congress-blog/homeland-security/229406-tsa-compromising-security-for-popularity-and-looking-at

Before signing up for TSA Pre Check read the article at the link. TSA wants to get its hands not only in your pants but into every aspect of your life.

TSA represents the 21st century police state.

Anonymous said...

pre check is great when opened but it is always closed at bwi.

Anonymous said...

Susan quoted:

"You know those PreCheck lanes at the airport that promise expedited screening? The TSA wants to fill them and it has come up with a troubling new twist on an old, contentious scheme to do it. While Congress and the rest of us were slipping out for the holidays, the TSA quietly published its intent to hire big data companies to solicit you for PreCheck enrollment, and seek your consent to mine your grocery receipts, your credit card purchases, and even your Facebook posts to determine if you are a terrorist risk – not just once but on an ongoing basis.

"...The government has concluded that low participation rates in the expedited airport screening program known as PreCheck must be due to poor marketing and slow enrollment, as opposed to the flying public recognizing a bad deal when they see it."


I do believe this is the most vile thing TSA has come up with yet. Naked photos and groping are at least confined to the airports. Now TSA wants to be in your house, at your job, on your phone, and in your computer--and in the same places with respect to your family and friends, too--and they will still photograph your naked body and stick their hands in your crotch at the airport feel like it. TSA wants to confiscate your data, your speech, your associations, and your private thoughts! I have no confidence in TSA's ability to apply any data gained through such heinous spying to effective use or with any degree of transparency. (TSA can't provide data to justify the effectiveness of the current PreCheck program, and TSA continues the BDO program despite GAO concluding that it is worthless!) I have no confidence that TSA can secure the data they gain through such reprehensible snooping. (How many massive data breaches have happened in the recent years in both the private and public sectors?)

I was going to write that this isn't consistent with the principles underlying Obama's Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights (available at http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/privacy-final.pdf), but the CPBOR has a convenient footnote that says, "This framework is concerned solely with how private-sector entities handle personal data in commercial settings. A separate set of constitutional and statutory protections apply to the government’s access to data that is in the possession of private parties." How disconcerting to know that the US government is exempting itself from practices that it says are decent, respectful, and indicative of a free society when there is private sector data to be vacuumed up for the government's use! No: The US government is just as much a third party as any private sector third party, and consumers deserve the same protections from the US government as they do the private sector third parties!

Anonymous said...

How about an update on TSA's progress in responding to the 5,000+ comments on the AIT NPRM?

Anonymous said...

Why is TSA trying to go NSA by spying on millions of innocent people via Big Data when the NSA admitted that its bulk detection program was not actually effective?

Link: http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jan/10/nsa-mass-surveillance-powers-john-inglis-npr

[Screenshot]

Anonymous said...

are you folks seriously calling Pre-Bribe a "risk-based" program with a straight face?? how many have been rejected for Pre-Bribe after forking over the geld?? how about some transparency on enrollment numbers and how many folks are adjudged too "risky" to remain in the program??

Anonymous said...

since we're talking "risk-based security", I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense. now you're even allowing college kids with no track record(kaydets) to endure more reasonable screening, but those who sacrificed for 20+ have to take their bloody shoes and belts off!! it's pretty clear that TSA doesn't understand risk assessment or risk-based anything, much less security.

Anonymous said...

TSA "Precheck" makes a mockery of airline passenger security screening. Recall the indignant outrage when we started to hear of grandmothers and babies subjected to, ahem, "closer scrutiny", a euphemism for a hands on search stopping just short of a cavity exam? Justification (rationalization) being that someone intent on doing harm would have no compunctions about using the least likely to be suspected members of the traveling public to circumvent security screening. "Treat everyone equally, NO PROFILING ALLOWED", Thank you. I get it, even if some of my fellow travelers didn't: someone with absolutely no inclination to do harm could be convinced to do something if placed under duress.

The obvious question then: if a passenger is "cleared" for TSA Precheck, why would any thinking person not understand that bad guys potentially view less thoroughly screened passengers as a very convenient means of doing their dirty work? That duress thing, again. Why has this "program" not only not been STOPPED, but EXPANDED???

Pending common sense intervention by the people that are in a position to end this program, I will continue to choose alternatives to air travel.