Friday, December 5, 2014

TSA Week in Review: 30 Loaded Firearms, Smoke Grenade, Machete, and More



Loaded firearm discovered in carry-on bag at CHS.
Loaded firearm discovered in carry-on bag at CHS.
38 Firearms Discovered This WeekOf the 38 firearms, 30 were loaded and 15 had rounds chambered.

Smoke Grenade
Discovered in carry-on bag at IAD.
Smoke Grenade - A fireworks-style smoke grenade was discovered in a carry-on bag at Washington-Dulles (IAD).
Inert Ordnance and Grenades etc. – We continue to find inert grenades and other weaponry on a weekly basis. Please keep in mind that if an item looks like a real bomb, grenade, mine, etc., it is prohibited. When these items are found at a checkpoint or in checked baggage, they can cause significant delays because the explosives detection professionals must respond to resolve the alarm. Even if they are novelty items, you are prohibited from bringing them on the aircraft.  Read here on why inert items cause problems.
  • Four inert grenades were discovered this week. Three were discovered in carry-on bags at New Orleans (MSY) and Las Vegas (LAS). One was discovered in a checked bag at Jacksonville (JAX).
Four inert hand grenades.
(L-R) Grenades discovered at MSY, LAS, and JAX

Artfully Concealed Prohibited Items – It’s important to examine your bags prior to traveling to ensure you are not carrying any prohibited items. If a prohibited item is discovered in your bag or on your body, you could be cited and possibly arrested by law enforcement. Here are a few examples from this week where prohibited items were found by our officers in strange places. 
  • A machete was discovered concealed within the lining of a carry-on bag at Tampa (TPA).
Miscellaneous Prohibited Items In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons and many other prohibited items too numerous to note.

Assorted knives.
Clockwise from top: Items discovered at LAX, CLT, ORF, LAS & ALB
Stun Guns17 stun guns were discovered in carry-on bags this week. Two were discovered at Portland (PDX), two at Sacramento (SMF), and the remainder were discovered at Birmingham (BHM), Dallas Love (DAL), Denver (DEN), Las Vegas (LAS), Northwest Arkansas (XNA), Oklahoma City (OKC), Orange County (SNA), Pasco (PSC), Phoenix (PHX), San Francisco (SFO), Savannah (SAV), Seattle (SEA) and Syracuse (SYR). 
Ammunition – When packed properly, ammunition can be transported in your checked baggage, but it is never permissible to pack ammo in your carry-on bag.

Three loaded firearms.
Clockwise from top left: Firearms discovered at BWI, IAH & SAT
Four loaded firearms.
Clockwise from top left: Firearms discovered at: SMF, LBB, DTW, SAT
38 Firearms Discovered This Week – Of the 38 firearms, 30 were loaded and 15 had rounds chambered.*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates.

You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms. Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $7,500. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions, that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

If you haven’t seen it yet, make sure you check out our TSA Blog Year in Review for 2013. You can also check out 2011 & 2012 as well.

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If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact us by clicking here.

23 comments:

Anonymous said...

Are these people, each week, just that stupid or it's some type of expensive game of hid and seek.

SSSS for Some Reason said...

First, nothing from the nudie-scanners... wonder why? I mean just statistically they should have turned up something.

Second, the pictures again. You used at least three pictures from earlier posts. I know the guns were probably the same make or model so from an information point of view its fine. But at the same time.... we are paying you eight billion dollars a year and you can't even get the most up to date pictures for use on your website? I've got kids at work that can get pictures posted to the internet before the flash-stars fade from my eyes.

And then, just out of curiosity.... why were the little key-knives confiscated? I can get a bigger knife from the first class dining area on most flights so its not like they are dangerous or anything.

RB said...

http://mobile.reuters.com/article/idUSKBN0JK0JX20141206?irpc=932


Border, airport screening exempt from new U.S. profiling rules


http://www.usatoday.com/story/travel/flights/2013/11/14/tsa-behavior-pistole-profiling/3529275/


Pistole said "profiling has absolutely no place" in behavior detection, and allegations of profiling would be investigated thoroughly." It's not good law enforcement. It's not good security work, from our perspective. And it's not constitutional," Pistole said. "Anybody who is found to be profiling will be investigated and dealt with appropriately."


Will the real TSA please stand up.

What part of a Limited Administrative Search for WEI does PROFILING play?

Anonymous said...

As always, absolutely nothing you needed your slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners to detect. Meanwhile, how many people suffered physical searches thanks to false alarms on these useless machines?

Why are Curtis Burns and West Cooper unwilling to address, let alone answer, that question?

How many weeks has it been since you last trumpeted something dangerous you found with the naked body scanners?

Stoyan said...

Hello,
So basically I'm not allowed to carry with my anything that looks like a real gun?

I've a nephew in Las Vegas, Nevada than I'm going to visit for Christmas and I've bough him a big toy gun - which is made from plastic ofcorse.


Am I going to have problems at the airport with it? I don't want to leave my little nephew without christmas present. As I told the gun is made from plastic.

Thanks in advance.

RB said...

Stoyan said...
Hello,
So basically I'm not allowed to carry with my anything that looks like a real gun?

I've a nephew in Las Vegas, Nevada than I'm going to visit for Christmas and I've bough him a big toy gun - which is made from plastic ofcorse.


Am I going to have problems at the airport with it? I don't want to leave my little nephew without christmas present. As I told the gun is made from plastic.

Thanks in advance.

December 8, 2014 at 5:03 AM
.................
TSA probably won't answer your question. If you attempt to carry on anything that even remotely looks like a weapon TSA will stop you.

You can check it, ship it, but you cannot take it in the passenger cabin.

TSA confiscated a ladies purse because it had an image of a gun on it.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/12/02/tsa-stops-passenger-over-purse-design_n_1125354.html

TSA confiscated toy Disney Pirates of the Caribbean Toys.

http://www.nbcmiami.com/news/local/TSA-Plunders-Boys-Disney-Toys.html

TSA even confiscated a mentally challenged mans toy plastic hammer.

http://hotair.com/archives/2011/06/11/tsa-confiscates-mentally-challenged-mans-toy/

Do you think the feckless TSA screeners are going to let you get by with a toy gun if the above is an example of their competency?

Anonymous said...

TSA keeps getting better...

http://skift.com/2014/12/08/why-the-tsa-just-had-its-best-year-ever/

Susan Richart said...

Anonymous wrote:

"TSA keeps getting better...

http://skift.com/2014/12/08/why-the-tsa-just-had-its-best-year-ever/

December 9, 2014 at 3:25 PM"

You do realize that this is a travel marketing website and as such must sing praise of the TSA for fear of a drop in revenue if people refuse to travel, especially by air. The site certainly is not writing from an objective and honest point of view.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Anonymous said...

Susan said "The site certainly is not writing from an objective and honest point of view."

But you're objective right? Fail.

Susan Richart said...

At least I have the courage to identify myself. You fail big-time at that simple task.

Anonymous said...

Hello,
So basically I'm not allowed to carry with my anything that looks like a real gun?

I've a nephew in Las Vegas, Nevada than I'm going to visit for Christmas and I've bough him a big toy gun - which is made from plastic ofcorse.


Am I going to have problems at the airport with it? I don't want to leave my little nephew without christmas present. As I told the gun is made from plastic.

Thanks in advance.

I love it when disgruntled ex-screeners answer questions incorectly.
The answer is simple, if the toy gun is a realistic replica, you may have a problem with it. I look at it like this, if a person with impaired vision may think it's real, then assume it is too realistic and it should be check. That would be the common sense approach I would use. Others choose to believe in black helicopters...

Anonymous said...

"But you're objective right? Fail."

And you rely on facts? Fail.

TSA, please provide facts supporting the efficacy of the naked body scanners and PreCheck. I am a US taxpayer, and I have a right to know how you are spending taxpayer funds. I am a US citizen, and I have a right to comment on your procedures, especially when they violate Constitutional rights and basic human rights.

RB said...

ANON SAID.....I love it when disgruntled ex-screeners answer questions incorectly. The answer is simple, if the toy gun is a realistic replica, you may have a problem with it. I look at it like this, if a person with impaired vision may think it's real, then assume it is too realistic and it should be check. That would be the common sense approach I would use. Others choose to believe in black helicopters...December 12, 2014 at 9:41 AM
************************************
I answered the question and gave examples of how TSA has acted in past encounters with the public so exactly where was my response incorrect?

I'll tell you again, but it seems your tiny brain cannot comprehend even simple things, I have never had a relationship with TSA other than as a passenger.

How long have you been a TSA clerk?

SSSS for Some Reason said...

".,..I look at it like this, if a person with impaired vision may think it's real, then assume it is too realistic and it should be check."

That's nice.

First, you aren't the one setting the (low) standards the TSA follows.

Second, that is an incredibly stupid metric to use for.... well... anything!

If someone with impared vision is going to look at my SUV and think it a tank should I leave it in the garage so as to not scare them? If my comb looks like it might be a firearm should I allow my hair to remain windblown so as to not frighten anyone else?

How about this.... if someone has a firearm in their hand and is pointing it at other people in a threatening manner then, and only then, we assume the person has criminal intent and should be stopped. That way you can cover all of the senses.... the hard of hearing can see that a gun is being pointed at someone. The vision impaired can hear the criminal yelling (criminals always seem to be yelling) and know something bad is going down.

You really are no better than the TSA, reacting to items instead of threats; mistaking theater for security; and assuming that nothing happening is a positive sign that someone else is doing their job.

Anonymous said...

Why do former TSOs RB and Susan have such an ax to grind?

Colm Barry said...

While I can just about imagine someone to be too stupid to understand that an "artfully" similar replica of e.g. a grenade was still prohibited for obvious reasons (obvious to most others that is), I still can't get over the repeated finds of loaded firearms or stun guns (have been following this blog for months now). Sometimes I wonder if these are people who have been ordered to attend their mother-in-laws birthday and seek a way to miss that plane ...

SSSS for Some Reason said...

Anonymous said..."Why do former TSOs RB and Susan have such an ax to grind?"


What's it to you? Why would you care why they have an ax to grind? Or are you trying to imply that them having an ax to grind is reason enough to prevent their participation in this so-called conversation the TSA has built?

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...

"Why do former TSOs RB and Susan have such an ax to grind?"

Blog team, why do you STILL allow someone to post a known lie, in violation of posted guidelines? Must be West posting this, or TSORon. Who else would have an axe to grind with RB and Susan?

Anonymous said...

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense. now you're even allowing college kids (kaydets) to endure more reasonable screening, but those who sacrificed for 20+ have to take their bloody shoes and belts off!!

Anonymous said...

answered the question and gave examples of how TSA has acted in past encounters with the public so exactly where was my response incorrect?

I'll tell you again, but it seems your tiny brain cannot comprehend even simple things, I have never had a relationship with TSA other than as a passenger.

How long have you been a TSA clerk?
I have to appologize. I seem to have included two responses to one question. Your question completly legit.Sorry if I emplied otherwise.

Anonymous said...

"Why do former TSOs RB and Susan have such an ax to grind?"

The anonymous person who asked that question possibly does not realize that, if RB and Susan are indeed former screeners, it only gives their comments here more credibility.

Good job, Anonymous.

RB said...

Anonymous Anonymous said...
answered the question and gave examples of how TSA has acted in past encounters with the public so exactly where was my response incorrect?

I'll tell you again, but it seems your tiny brain cannot comprehend even simple things, I have never had a relationship with TSA other than as a passenger.

How long have you been a TSA clerk?
I have to appologize. I seem to have included two responses to one question. Your question completly legit.Sorry if I emplied otherwise.

December 16, 2014 at 12:15 PM
...............
Not sure if you were replying to me or someone else.

Your earlier comment not only accused me of being a former TSA clerk but also of disseminating incorrect information. Neither of which are true.

I love it when disgruntled ex-screeners answer questions incorectly.

The answer is simple, if the toy gun is a realistic replica, you may have a problem with it. I look at it like this, if a person with impaired vision may think it's real, then assume it is too realistic and it should be check. That would be the common sense approach I would use. Others choose to believe in black helicopters...

December 12, 2014 at 9:41 AM


I'll say it again for the slow learners, I have never applied for or have been employed by TSA.

The response I gave to the person asking about taking a toy gun to his nephew was correct and given with examples of how TSA has reacted in past encounters with the public to things that are not realistic replicas and completely harmless.

The problem is that TSA employees apparently have no common sense or are just to stupid to know the difference between a "realistic replica" and a purse or toy.

The public deserves to have a concise list of items that are not permitted through a TSA checkpoint and TSA employees need to be held to a standard of accountability.

AirRifle said...

Hundreds of millions of passengers and a few chronic whiners. Keep up the great work TSA and secure those skies!