Friday, November 7, 2014

TSA Week in Review - 37 Loaded Firearms, a Claymore Mine Replica, and Other Items of Note



Discovered inert grenades

Inert Ordnance and Grenades etc. – We continue to find inert grenades and other weaponry on a weekly basis. Please keep in mind that if an item looks like a real bomb, grenade, mine, etc., it is prohibited. When these items are found at a checkpoint or in checked baggage, they can cause significant delays because the explosives detection professionals must resolve the alarm to determine the level of threat. Even if they are novelty items, you cannot bring them on a plane.  Read here on why inert items cause problems.

  • A realistic replica of a Claymore anti-personnel mine was discovered in a traveler’s checked bag at San Francisco (SFO).
  • Three spent smoke grenades were discovered in a checked bag at Richmond (RIC).

40 Firearms Discovered This WeekOf the 40 firearms, 37 were loaded and 13 had rounds chambered.

Loaded firearms
Loaded firearms discovered in carry-bag at AUS
Artfully Concealed Prohibited Items – It’s important to examine your bags prior to traveling to ensure you are not carrying prohibited items. If a prohibited item is discovered in your bag or on your body, you could be cited and possibly arrested by local law enforcement. Here are a few examples from this week where prohibited items were found by our officers in strange places.

  • A sword cane was detected in a carry-on bag at New York Kennedy (JFK).  
  • A belt buckle knife was discovered at Rapid City (RAP).  
  • A sword cane was discovered in a carry-on bag at Phoenix (PHX).
  • A knife was discovered concealed in a shoe at Philadelphia (PHL).
discovered knives
Belt Buckle Knife (RAP), Bladed Survival Tool in Shoe (PHL), Sword Cane (PHX)
Discovered kubotans
Kubotan discovered this week at RIC.

Kubotans - A Kubotan  is a small wooden, plastic, or metal self-defense weapon that’s usually found on a key chain ring (see photo). Certain varieties of Kubotans can pull apart to reveal a blade or pepper spray. They’re considered a martial arts weapon and are prohibited from being packed in your carry-on bags. They’re illegal in some jurisdictions and can lead to civil penalties or even arrest.



What Not to Say at an Airport – Statements like these not only delay the people who said them but can also inconvenience many other passengers if the checkpoint or terminal has to be evacuated:

  • During a bag search at the New York Kennedy airport (JFK), a passenger stated: “Why you looking in my bag? There’s a bomb in there.” There was no bomb in his bag.

 Miscellaneous Prohibited Items In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons and many other prohibited items too numerous to note.
discovered knives
(Top to bottom) Knives Discovered At: RIC, SNA, JFK, HNL

discovered stun guns
Stun Gun (MGW)


Stun Guns – Ten stun guns were discovered this week in carry-on bags at Atlanta (ATL), Birmingham (BHM), Jacksonville (JAX), Morgantown (MGW), Nashville (BNA), New Orleans (MSY), Phoenix (PHX), Sacramento (SMF), San Juan (SJU), and Springfield (SGF).


(Clockwise from top left corner) Firearms discovered at: RNO, SAN, IAH & BNA
(Clockwise from top left corner) Firearms discovered at: RNO, SAN, IAH & BNA

(Clockwise from top) Firearms discovered at:IAH, MCI & FAI
(Clockwise from top) Firearms discovered at:IAH, MCI & FAI

Table for discovered firearms in carry-on bags list
*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates.



You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms. Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.



Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $7,500. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions, that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.



If you haven’t seen it yet, make sure you check out our TSA Blog Year in Review for 2013. You can also check out 2011 & 2012 as well.



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If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact us by clicking here.

48 comments:

New Beginnings said...

A claymore mine clearly labeled INERT.

You TSA people have no shame do you?

Anonymous said...

Looks like TSA has ignore peoples 232civil rights and the law one time too many.

Sai is about to hand TSA and numerous TSA employees their collective rear ends and rightfully so.

Bobby, get out one of your tacky ties ready, you'll need it in court.

Anonymous said...

This used to be an interesting page when it was first set up, lots of funny and sometimes constructive comments. Shame that the MAN has taken control of the edit button, hence the death of free speech--shame on you. This is for you Dave, in Colorado, I know it won't get posted, just my little vent.

trevia said...

I don't know how these people does not review his/ger bags before travel.... are they stupid?

Anonymous said...

Bravo TSA. I employees your ability to screen millions of passengers every day and keep our skies safe. Can't even imagine what some of these idiots would do on a plane with their weapon. Especially the ones that "forgot" they had a loaded firearm in their bag they packed just hours ago.

But please, work some deal out with the postal service. Some sort of automated kiosk near security so that I can mail myself the pocket knife I forgot to put in my checked luggage.

Hearns said...

Your screeners obviously misheard or choose to mishear the man in your "No Free Speech!!" quote above.

He said, "Why are you looking in my bag? There is no bomb in there."

Train your employees better, TSA.

And stop lying to America, blotter team.

Anonymous said...

As always, absolutely nothing you needed your slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners to detect. Meanwhile, how many people suffered physical searches thanks to false alarms on these useless machines?

Why are Curtis Burns and West Cooper unwilling to address, let alone answer, that question?

How many weeks has it been since you last trumpeted something dangerous you found with the naked body scanners?

Looking Left said...

If finding guns is just a distraction to TSA's primary mission then why is so much time being wasted reporting on finding guns?

By the way, what is TSA's primary mission?

SSSS for Some Reason said...

"... Anonymous said...
Bravo TSA. I employees your ability to screen millions of passengers every day and keep our skies safe. Can't even imagine what some of these idiots would do on a plane with their weapon. "

In reverse order...

By the TSA's own admission their screening is very porous so for all the firearms posted in this blotter there are at least that many more that slipped by. That is a pretty strong indication that those 'idiots' aren't doing anything on the aircraft with their weapons. And would you like to know why? Because having a weapon does not make you a bad guy. Lots of people have weapons, maybe even the guy right behind you in the check out like right now!

And the TSA doesn't get the credit for keeping our skies safe, we the travelling public do. The airlines installed better cockpit doors and the passengers learned that we won't comply. The last three attempts by terrorists against Commercial Aviation were stopped by the passengers.

While I certainly don't want to be the passengers who gets shot or stabbed, because that is going to hurt and probably leave a scar, I will not be sitting down casually waiting for the terrorist to get through the cockpit door.

Chris Boyce said...

What??? Two weeks in a row without finding any drugs?

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
Bravo TSA. I employees your ability to screen millions of passengers every day and keep our skies safe. Can't even imagine what some of these idiots would do on a plane with their weapon. Especially the ones that "forgot" they had a loaded firearm in their bag they packed just hours ago.

November 8, 2014 at 7:47 AM
---------------------------------
you don't have to imagine. TSA's publicly reported numbers show that they allow 7 through for every 3 they catch. look around you on the plane. odds support at least one person carrying a weapon. see what they are doing? nothing. at least nothing violent, dangerous, or evil. this is all security theatre and does not make us safer at all.

Anonymous said...

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense.

L. Jamerson said...

Thank you TSA for keeping our skies safe. Since 9-11 your dedication to the flying public has been terrific. Before TSA the problems of hijackings were ever present, due to an unskilled security system in place where the "bottom line" was the only concern. Believe me I had flown many times for business back then, and many a traveler were fearful for their safety.



Anonymous said...

"A claymore mine clearly labeled INERT.

You TSA people have no shame do you?"

Oh, well then clearly it is. I guess if a terrorist wanted to blow up a plane, he shpould just write "inert" on it and TSA should ignore it..

Come on, really?


Anonymous said...

"While I certainly don't want to be the passengers who gets shot or stabbed, because that is going to hurt and probably leave a scar, I will not be sitting down casually waiting for the terrorist to get through the cockpit door."

Why do people assume the only way to take down a plane is thru the cockpit door?

I would feel very safe if you were a terrorist.

RB said...

Was the cannon confiscated by TSA or did it make it to the intended destination?

Anonymous said...

It's amazing that some of you writing in on this will defend someone who's not even smart enough to figure out that they will probably be caught going through screening, whether it be drugs, guns, or knives. You'd rather attack the inspector instead of the person who caused the problem. Fact: box cutters killed people during 9/11--it didn't just leave a scar. Have you never watched some of the training camp video snippets and what they are teaching them? And by the way, I don't think the X-ray machines are capable of reading the writing on the claymore--it probably just looks like live munitions on the screen. But if you like, I'm sure TSA will let you go take the bag apart and find out whether its real or not. Common sense people.

Anonymous said...

"...Can't even imagine what some of these idiots would do on a plane with their weapon..."

They would do ... nothing. No one was arrested. TSA chief Pistole said two weeks ago that guns are only a "distraction."

SSSS for Some Reason said...

Anonymous said...
"While I certainly don't want to be the passengers who gets shot or stabbed, because that is going to hurt and probably leave a scar, I will not be sitting down casually waiting for the terrorist to get through the cockpit door."

Why do people assume the only way to take down a plane is thru the cockpit door?

I would feel very safe if you were a terrorist.

~~~~~~~~~~~~

I am not the one with the limited imagination, the TSA is.

Everything they are screening for aims at the cockpit door to take over an aircraft (stun guns, firearms, knives, etc) or aims at using passengers as hostages (stun guns, firearms, knives, etc) to gain compliance from flight crew.

Liquid explosives are not a viable option for people to be carrying through security, and any other explosive carried through in a large enough quantity to take down an aircraft will be revealed by the existing security checks that do not include the Nudie-Scanners or BDO Detection Agents.

If your goal is simply to cause death and destruction there are a million different ways to do that with an airplane and nothing TSA does is going to prevent even a tenth of the possibilities. The fact that a plane hasn't been blown up over the US is proof of the fact that there are very few terrorists in the world and even fewer still who look at aircraft and think about blowing them up.

And no, I am not suggesting we give up security. That is silly and you should be embarrassed for even thinking it.

I am suggesting we handle security using actual risk-based evaluations.

Hijacking an aircraft in flight is so near a zero possibility of success that we should spend almost no time or money on preventing it. The crew and passengers will not comply with the terrorists attempt at hijacking a plane so why does the TSA spend so much effort trying to prevent hijackers by blocking knives and guns and things that are generally pointy in nature?

The TSA does a lot of things. The question is how many of those things are they doing well? How many are they doing well enough to justify Eight Billion dollars a year? No, the lack of a second September 11th event is not proof of success. It is only proof of the lack of terrorist attempts to repeat that terrible tragedy.

Wintermute said...

Anonymous said...
"It's amazing that some of you writing in on this will defend someone who's not even smart enough to figure out that they will probably be caught going through screening"

Actually, with about a 70% failure rate, they probably won't be caught. An no one here has defended them, per-se. Just pointed out the fact that for every three caught, 7 fly, and yet planes are not falling from the skies.

storage said...

Wow! Ever since TSA is keep on posting about firearms. What makes it more sad is that. It seems people aren't taking seriously about this warning.

Black Cat said...

If something looks "scary" on an xray, the screeners actually look at it. Why do so many people assume they don't?

And an inert, replica, or toy weapon doesn't just have REPLICA, INERT, or TOY written on them. They actually are inert, a replica, and a toy. A quick, and occasionally a longer examination of the inert, replica, or toy item proves it.

Yet, the TSA confiscates them. Not because they are a threat The latest ridiculous excuse the TSA is spewing is they take inert, replica, and toy weapons because the flying public would be scared. ROTFLMAO!

No, we are tired of the confiscation of our private property.

Black Cat said...

Hey, remember, the TSA thought a ray gun-shaped belt buckle, a toy light saber and a light saber cane (carried by Peter Mayhew) should be confiscated.

RB said...

Anonymous said..

"Why do people assume the only way to take down a plane is thru the cockpit door? I would feel very safe if you were a terrorist."

November 10, 2014 at 9:46 AM

You ask a very ikportant question. To gain control of the airplane one must gain entrance to the cockpit. Killing passengers won't open that door.

Now if the goal is to just blow up an airplane then TSA is criminally negligent given that the people who maintain and support the airplanes get little to no screening at all.

TSA is a sad joke foisted on taxpayers.

Anonymous said...

"Hijacking an aircraft in flight is so near a zero possibility of success that we should spend almost no time or money on preventing it. That doent even make sense


The crew and passengers will not comply with the terrorists attempt at hijacking a plane so why does the TSA spend so much effort trying to prevent hijackers by blocking knives and guns and things that are generally pointy in nature? they dont have to comply. They can just get shot. And I garauntee, you shoot 20-30 people, the rest are going to comply.

The TSA does a lot of things. The question is how many of those things are they doing well? How many are they doing well enough to justify Eight Billion dollars a year? No, the lack of a second September 11th event is not proof of success. It is only proof of the lack of terrorist attempts to repeat that terrible tragedy. how do you know there have been no attempts? How do you now that some of those people who have had their guns taken at the checkpoint were not going to start shooting passengers? Or perhaps start shooting inside the airport terminal? Planes are not the only target. Shooting 10-20 people at a bording gate is just as effective as shooting on a plane. How do you know none had ill initent? You dont. You have no idea wha their motivations or initentions were. Now if you want to put your children on an unscreened plane, you go right ahead.

SSSS for Some Reason said...

Anonymous said...how do you know there have been no [terrorist] attempts?


How do I know? Because no planes have been attacked by terrorists. In other countries that don't have the TSA, none of the planes in those skies have been attacked either.

".... Or perhaps start shooting inside the airport terminal? Planes are not the only target. Shooting 10-20 people at a bording gate is just as effective as shooting on a plane."

But they can't shoot people in the security line? Or at the ticketing counters?

"...How do you know none had ill initent? You dont. You have no idea wha their motivations or initentions were. "

I can make a pretty good guess what their initentions were because it is in the past. If a passenger had ill intent then we would have heard about it since we are now after the fact.

Which ties in real nicely with your next statement.....

"Now if you want to put your children on an unscreened plane, you go right ahead. "

Who here, besides you I mean, has ever suggested we give up completely up on security screening?

Wintermute said...

TSAnonymous said...

"Now if you want to put your children on an unscreened plane, you go right ahead."

Nice strawman there. Has anyone here ever said "no screening?"

Susan Richart said...

"you shoot 20-30 people..."

The pilot won't let that happen. He'll put the plane into a pylon-like turn or perhaps a steep dive or ascent to thrown the bad guys off balance.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Anonymous said...

Again TSAnonymous, you can before from a dictionary or spell check.

We know the TSA hasn't ever found a terrorist because they would still be crowing about it if they had.

And we know the thousands of people carrying weapons onboard planes had no ill intent because none of them have attacked a plane or boarding gate.

Anonymous said...

I can see why there are so many so called "accidental" shootings in this country. People forget where they have their firearms stored? If they cannot remember where they stored their firearm, they should not be allowed to own one.....since they know nothing about firearms safety. I see the negative comments directed against the TSA here, who are trying to make the skies safer. Dont forget....YOU DO NOT HAVE A RIGHT TO FLY....it is a privilege, just like your drivers license. And yes, I am a responsible firearms owner!!

Susan Richart said...

"That doent even make sense"

"And I garauntee..."

"...at a bording gate....."

"You dont."

Is it that you type so fast that you make mistakes and don't bother to correct them; do you not know the correct spelling of the words that are underscored in red; do you not use a spell checker or are you typical TSA lackadaisical and don't care?

screen shot/DHS OIG statement



RB said...

Susan Richart said...
"you shoot 20-30 people..."

The pilot won't let that happen. He'll put the plane into a pylon-like turn or perhaps a steep dive or ascent to thrown the bad guys off balance.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

November 12, 2014 at 4:43 PM
.................
The pilots could do that.

They could also dump the pressurization and pop open the outflow valve quickly sending cabin altitude up to the aircraft's real altitude. The sudden pressure change would disorient the passengers and lack of oxygen would soon render them unable to function.

You can bet that flight crew have an emergency procedures in place to deal with a situation like this.

Anonymous said...

"Wow! Ever since TSA is keep on posting about firearms. What makes it more sad is that. It seems people aren't taking seriously about this warning."

How many people forget the large bottles of water and shampoo in their carry-ons? Those are prohibited items, too--though TSA does not post photos of them--so don't forget to cover them with your outrage.

RB said...

Anonymous said...
I can see why there are so many so called "accidental" shootings in this country. People forget where they have their firearms stored? If they cannot remember where they stored their firearm, they should not be allowed to own one.....since they know nothing about firearms safety. I see the negative comments directed against the TSA here, who are trying to make the skies safer. Dont forget....YOU DO NOT HAVE A RIGHT TO FLY....it is a privilege, just like your drivers license. And yes, I am a responsible firearms owner!!

November 13, 2014 at 6:29 AM
.......................

You are clearly wrong.


Your Right to Fly

Your Right to Fly
Flying is more than a privilege, it is your right.

Under Contract:

When you make a lawful purchase of an airline ticket, it is your property. It represents your right to receive a service from the airline; and the airline’s corresponding duty to provide that service to you, subject to the terms of the contract between you and the airline.

Under Statute:

"A citizen of the United States has a public right of transit through the
navigable airspace." 49 US Code-Section 40103 (2)


In the Constitution:

"The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people."

Common Law:

"The right to travel is a well-established common right that does not owe its existence to the federal government. It is recognized by the courts as a natural right." Schactman v. Dulles, 96 App DC 287, 225 F2d 938, at 941.

Case Law:

"The right to travel is a part of the liberty of which the citizen cannot be deprived without due process of law under the Fifth Amendment."
Kent v. Dulles, 357 US 116, 125.

The last point to be aware of is that government cannot take a right away from a citizen without Due Process. So TSA has no authority to restrict a persons travel unless they go through the courts to do so.

I don't know where this non-sense that traveling, by any means, is not a right but it certainly does demonstrate the lack of knowledge of many people. You are one of them!

Anonymous said...

"...And I garauntee, you shoot 20-30 people, the rest are going to comply..."

Shoot them with what? Who said the walk-through metal detectors and carry-on baggage x-rays should be removed? It's the walk-through metal detectors and carry-on baggage x-rays that are finding the guns in the first place, per the weekly blog posts!

And what do you think the pilots (and perhaps an air marshal) are doing while the hypothetical mass shooting is underway? Are they maintaining an even cruising altitude and reminding everyone to keep their seatbelts fastened in case of unexpected turbulence?

"..How do you now that some of those people who have had their guns taken at the checkpoint were not going to start shooting passengers?..."

How many times must it be said that NO ARRESTS were made in conjunction with those confiscated guns? In an 11/4/14 USA Today article, John Pistole called finding guns a 'distraction' and not something that is part of TSA's 'primary mission.' Pistole is the head of TSA, and he actually has more credibility that you do.

How many times must the Red Team tests be pointed out? TSA misses more guns than it finds, according to the Red Team tests!

Anonymous said...

Anonymous poster unfamiliar with US law said, "Dont forget....YOU DO NOT HAVE A RIGHT TO FLY..."

WRONG. The US Code of Laws says, "A citizen of the United States has a public right of transit through the navigable airspace."

Find it here:

http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/USCODE-2011-title49/html/USCODE-2011-title49-subtitleVII-partA-subparti-chap401-sec40103.htm

Anonymous said...

"Your Right to Fly
Flying is more than a privilege, it is your right.

Under Contract:

When you make a lawful purchase of an airline ticket, it is your property. It represents your right to receive a service from the airline; and the airline’s corresponding duty to provide that service to you, subject to the terms of the contract between you and the airline.

Under Statute:

"A citizen of the United States has a public right of transit through the
navigable airspace." 49 US Code-Section 40103 (2)


In the Constitution:

"The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people."

Common Law:

"The right to travel is a well-established common right that does not owe its existence to the federal government. It is recognized by the courts as a natural right." Schactman v. Dulles, 96 App DC 287, 225 F2d 938, at 941.

Case Law:

"The right to travel is a part of the liberty of which the citizen cannot be deprived without due process of law under the Fifth Amendment."
Kent v. Dulles, 357 US 116, 125.

The last point to be aware of is that government cannot take a right away from a citizen without Due Process. So TSA has no authority to restrict a persons travel unless they go through the courts to do so.

I don't know where this non-sense that traveling, by any means, is not a right but it certainly does demonstrate the lack of knowledge of many people. You are one of them!"

So buy a plane, or rent a private jet and fly. Who is stopping you?
2 observations..nobody is taking away your right to fly. And nobody is trying to stop you from flying commercially.

D.B. East said...

To the angry TSAnonymous:

1. Silly comment about buying a plane or renting a private jet for most people's flights. You should know, as we all actually do, that economically that is not practical or feasible for most flyers. That's why we make rational choices by purchasing a ticket on a commercial flight.

You know you are saying, "Buy a plane!" to the elderly, disabled, minors, foreigners, and those with low income, right?

2. By making commercial flying so onerous, such an assault on our bodies, properties, and rights, the TSA is taking away our right to fly without government interference.

People are threatened every day by TSA screeners, "Do you want to fly today?!" People are turned away by screeners and refused entry into the air side of the terminal for refusing to be sexually assaulted, for being disabled, for standing up for their rights, and for being secret put on government lists (often without cause).

Your statement that "nobody is trying to stop you from flying commercially" is patently false. Stop the victim blaming.

Jack Brickman said...

Everyone at the TSA does a heck of a job keeping this country safe. Screening can be incredibly difficult and time-consuming, and also political, so good job to all the men and women at the TSA. I work for a national security firm so I know firsthand the challenges of the job you have. As DHS says, if you see something, say something. Just be aware.

RB said...

So buy a plane, or rent a private jet and fly. Who is stopping you?2 observations..nobody is taking away your right to fly. And nobody is trying to stop you from flying commercially.November 14, 2014 at 1:14 PM
............................
Well Hotrod what you seem unable to grasp is that we can travel by any means we wish to use. Commercial air is a conrract between the carrier and a paying customer and government has no role in that transaction.

As far as your claim that no one is trying to stop people from flying demonstrates marked ignorance on your part. TSA's requirement to show ID or otherwise identify yourself to government is an example.

No fly lists that people are placed on but government will not affirm inclusion on any such list nor provide a reasonable way to challenge being placed on such list is another example.

If government cannot take a right from a citizen without due process then how can TSA block a persons travel?

TSA is only a cog in a much larger problem of citizens rights being destroyed by government and we citizens have allowed it to happen.

At some point either we will have no rights remaining, some political solution will be found, are the people will move to change our form of government which is a right retained by the people.

What I know without question is that TSA and its employees are part of the problem, not part of the solution.

Robert Ward said...

You do not have a right to use aviation transportation, period. If you are considered a threat to the public, you are not flying. You folks need to "wise up". There are security measures in place and if you do not follow them, you are not flying, period. Civil rights as far as flying is concerned, does not enter the mix. The public and the airlines are concerned about safety. Too many dangers out there to ignore the safety measures put in place.
So do not complain about the screening process, just don't use aviation. The few of you that hate the current situation, you are not missed! Most of us want to arrive to our destination, alive.

Jill Woodman said...

Lol @ Jack Brickham. If you really worked for a security firm, you'd know the TSA is just security theater eating eight billion dollars every year and the DHS's Spy-On-Your-Neighbor program is not about being aware. It's about fear and replicating the Stasi or Kim Jong Un's policies.

Anonymous said...

Is it illegal, against the law or a crime to ask if a TSA agent is a legal immigrant?

RB said...

Robert Ward said...You do not have a right to use aviation transportation, period. If you are considered a threat to the public, you are not flying. You folks need to "wise up". There are security measures in place and if you do not follow them, you are not flying, period. Civil rights as far as flying is concerned, does not enter the mix. The public and the airlines are concerned about safety. Too many dangers out there to ignore the safety measures put in place. So do not complain about the screening process, just don't use aviation. The few of you that hate the current situation, you are not missed! Most of us want to arrive to our destination, alive.November 17, 2014 at 12:40 PM
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
Just how ignorant can one person be? Does your freedom and civil rights have no meaning to you? If we allow government to take away one right (travel in this instance) without due process then what right will be next Travel is a right, a fact settled by the USSC. Travel by commrrcial air is a contract between the airline and a paying customer. Governments role is to interdict WEI, nothing more. As far as your remark that most of us want to get to our destinations alive I would disagree. All of us want to get to our destinations alive, all of us and TSA's Security Theater isn't helping to accomplish that objective. As long as TSA fails to screen 100% of all people entering the secure areas then none of us are safe. I have a pretty good hankering that Robert Ward is a TSA clerk and part of the TSA problem.

Jill Woodman said...

ROTFLMAO @ Robert Ward. No person getting on a plane in this country forfeits his or her civil rights, no matter how much you and your friends at the TSA want it to be.

Tell your buddy, Bob, the next time you're swapping luggage theft stories.

Wintermute said...

Robert Ward said...
"You do not have a right to use aviation transportation, period. If you are considered a threat to the public, you are not flying. You folks need to "wise up". There are security measures in place and if you do not follow them, you are not flying, period. Civil rights as far as flying is concerned, does not enter the mix. "

You could not be more wrong. Read some previous comments on this blog, where the exact statutes and court cases that establish flying as a right are cited. Just because you (and TSA) wish that it were not a right doesn't make it so.

SSSS for Some Reason said...

Robert Ward said..."You do not have a right to use aviation transportation, period. "

Thank you Mr Ward, but I beleive you have jumped into the deep end before you were really ready to do so.

Yes, we have a right to travel. Simply look upstream in the comments of this very article for the links and appropriate search strings.


Robert Ward then said.."If you are considered a threat to the public, you are not flying. "


That is an interesting understanding of what the TSA does.


Robert Ward then said..."You folks need to "wise up". There are security measures in place and if you do not follow them, you are not flying, period. "

That is the 8 Billion dollar a year question, isn't it? Does the TSA actually have security measures in place. It is a serious question. Water bottles, for example. They can't go through security because they might be dangerous. But they get thrown into a simple trash bin at the check point because its not like they are dangerous or anything.


Robert Ward then said..."Civil rights as far as flying is concerned, does not enter the mix. "

Why do you say that? Does the Rule of Law not apply inside of an airport? Do our Constitutionally Protested Rights not apply inside of an airport? What makes an airport so special that it is needs to be a Rights-Free-Zone?

Robert Ward then said..."The public and the airlines are concerned about safety. "

Something we can all agree on.


Robert Ward then said..."Too many dangers out there to ignore the safety measures put in place. "


No one is suggesting we don't have security. Well, you seem to be, but no one else. If you would take a few minutes and look back through these 'discussions' with the TSA you would see that most people want to return to Pre-911 security measures because they were more effective, more efficient, court tested to be Civil Rights compliant, and not cost eight billion dollars a year on top of a $25 extra Fee for every airline ticket.

Robert Ward then said..." So do not complain about the screening process, just don't use aviation. "

No. If you don't like the complaining then it is you who should avoid aviation. Unless you can give us the cost of a train ticket to Europe or suggest which roads we should take to Hawaii.

Robert Ward then said...."Most of us want to arrive to our destination, alive."

That is interesting. Are you the one not interested in arriving alive, or you are trying to insult everyone else by implying that we don't want to arrive alive.

Dixie Valdez said...

This is a interesting post. Few days back I had seen a claymore sword which was looking just amazing.