Friday, November 28, 2014

TSA Week in Review: 23 Loaded Firearms, a Cane Sword, and More



Loaded firearm discovered in carry-on bag at Atlanta (ATL).
Loaded firearm discovered in carry-on bag at Atlanta (ATL).

31 Firearms Discovered This WeekOf the 31 firearms, 23 were loaded and seven had rounds chambered.

Loaded Firearm (LGA)
Loaded Firearm (LGA)
Firearm on Passenger at LGA - A 94-year-old man attempted to enter the TSA checkpoint at LaGuardia (LGA) with a loaded .38 caliber revolver clipped to his belt in the small of his back on Wednesday. 

Inert Ordnance and Grenades etc. – We continue to find inert grenades and other weaponry on a weekly basis. Please keep in mind that if an item looks like a real bomb, grenade, mine, etc., it is prohibited. When these items are found at a checkpoint or in checked baggage, they can cause significant delays because the explosives detection professionals must respond to resolve the alarm. Even if they are novelty items, you are prohibited from bringing them on the aircraft.  Read here on why inert items cause problems.

Inert Grenade (BOS)
Inert Grenade (BOS)
  • An inert grenade was discovered in a carry-on bag at Boston (BOS).  

 Artfully Concealed Prohibited Items – It’s important to examine your bags prior to traveling to ensure you are not carrying any prohibited items. If a prohibited item is discovered in your bag or on your body, you could be cited and possibly arrested by law enforcement. Here are a few examples from this week where prohibited items were found by our officers in strange places.

  • A sword cane was discovered at Omaha (OMA).
  • A bag of heroin was discovered glued to the bottom of the lining in checked bag at Ontario (ONT).

Miscellaneous Prohibited Items In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons and many other prohibited items too numerous to note.
Spear Gun in Carry-on Bag at Las Vegas (LAS).
Spear Gun in Carry-on Bag at Las Vegas (LAS).
Flare Gun (AMA) - Sword Cane (OMA)
Flare Gun (AMA) - Sword Cane (OMA)
(L-R) Knives (And Saw) Discovered At: ALB, ALB, ORD & CRW
(L-R) Knives (And Saw) Discovered At: ALB, ALB, ORD & CRW
Stun Guns – 17 stun guns were discovered this week in carry-on bags: two were discovered at Reno (RNO), two at Dallas Love (DAL), two at Sacramento (SMF), another two at St. Louis (STL), and the remainder were discovered at Albuquerque (ABQ), Chicago O’Hare (ORD), Denver (DEN), Lubbock (LBB), Nashville (BNA), Salt Lake City (SLC), San Diego (SAN), Seattle (SEA), and Spokane (GEG). 

Ammunition – When packed properly, ammunition can be transported in your checked baggage, but it is never permissible to pack ammo in your carry-on bag.

(L-R, T-B) Loaded Firearms Discovered in Carry-on Bags at: IAH, BIL, JAN, PHX, IAH & PHX
(L-R, T-B) Loaded Firearms Discovered in Carry-on Bags at: IAH, BIL, JAN, PHX, IAH & PHX
*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates.



You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms. Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $7,500. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions, that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.



If you haven’t seen it yet, make sure you check out our TSA Blog Year in Review for 2013. You can also check out 2011 & 2012 as well.



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If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact us by clicking here.

51 comments:

Anonymous said...

As always, absolutely nothing you needed your slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners to detect. Meanwhile, how many people suffered physical searches thanks to false alarms on these useless machines?

Why are Curtis Burns and West Cooper unwilling to address, let alone answer, that question?

How many weeks has it been since you last trumpeted something dangerous you found with the naked body scanners?

Anonymous said...

How long before the first "naked scanner" or "Screenshot taken" post?

wait for it...

RB said...

How much oxidane did TSA confiscate this past week?

Anonymous said...

"...Firearm on Passenger at LGA - A 94-year-old man attempted to enter the TSA checkpoint at LaGuardia (LGA) with a loaded .38 caliber revolver clipped to his belt in the small of his back on Wednesday."

And who was not arrested and was allowed to "surrender" (that means it was confiscated) his firearm and complete his travel to florida.

Any other potential terrorists you care to share with the class?

Susan Richart said...

Two interesting tidbits on the internet this morning:

1. "A friend who worked for a public relations company in Europe tells of companies that hire people to post, anonymously, positive words on behalf of their clients and negative words about rivals. Political parties of various kinds, in various countries, are rumored to do the same."

http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/

Sound familiar?

2. "Many TSA screeners, IMO, sublimate. They take an innate instinct, such as aggressiveness or bullying, and find a "legitimate" outlet for those instincts, in this case employment with the TSA where they are able to bully and act aggressively under cover of "doing my job."

Better psychological testing might be able to fend off such individuals but I think the TSA is very pleased to have this type of behavior in its screeners."

http://www.flyertalk.com/forum/travel-safety-security-222/

That certainly rings true!

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

A Riddler said...

How many millions of non-threatening items such as water, shampoo, food, etc. we're seized from the 12,000,000+ people who flew last week?

32 guns? Out of over 12,000,000 people, you find 32...and missed 70.

Stop the hyping of insignificant gun finds. Your boss, Pistole, says they aren't the TSA's primary mission, because ZERO of the guns ever found were intended to be used at an airport or on a plane for terrorism. Unless it's against the law in the local jurisdiction, most of these people weren't arrested and ended up getting on their planes anyway, unless screeners retaliated and delayed the flyers after they dealt with real law enforcement.

Stop including drugs found in this blotter. You aren't DEA, nor real law enforcement. Occasionally finding illicit drugs is not part of TSA's primary mission. They aren't "good catches," they are random finds. Also, illicit drugs, especially in checked bags, are not a threat to flight safety.

12,000,000+ people flew. How many had naked pics taken of them and stored using MMW scanners? How many people had their breasts, buttocks, and genitals touched because they wanted to get on a plane?

How many parents had their breasts, buttocks, and genitals touched so they could carry food for their children?

What say you, blotter team? Are you and your bosses ready to answer some questions?

Chris Boyce said...

"A bag of heroin was discovered glued to the bottom of the lining in checked bag at Ontario (ONT)."

Really had to dig hard to find your drug bust this week. I didn't know that drugs, illegal or otherwise, are "Artfully concealed prohibited items" because I didn't see them on your list.

Once again, you must be proud.

Susan Richart said...

To the Anonymous poster who wrote this in another thread:

"would that be a crime to use a government computer to access a government website? Or are you just in favor of censorship of certain people?"

Yes, it is against the rules for employees of DHS to access DHS computers to post to any website, even a government website, when a TSA employee conceals or misrepresents his/her identity.

Don't believe me? Go look it up for yourself.

As for RB and I being "former disgruntled screeners", you are about as far off base as one could possibly be. Thanks for giving me a good laugh, however.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Agrippa said...

Midway Airport Security Line Reportedly Over 1 Mile Long

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/11/30/midway-airport-line-security-1-mile_n_6244282.html

An example of the capabilites of TSA "government employee" screeners. It's not a question of getting it fouled up but a question of how bad!

Anonymous said...

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense. now you're even allowing college kids (kaydets) to endure more reasonable screening, but those who sacrificed for 20+ have to take their bloody shoes and belts off!!

SSSS for Some Reason said...

The picture of the firearm that is the lead of this story... It is the same picture from your post on Nov 21.

And at least two of the photos in the collage shot were used in the photo collage from your November 6 post advertising how many firearms you had found so far.

I know the firearm found was probably the same model so as far as information is concerned it is fine. But you really should try harder because it is far to easy to believe that you are ginning up the information in an attempt to seem more important than you really are. We, the travelling public, are already well aware of your fear mongering so any attempt to breed more fear simply breeds more contempt for your agency.

For Eight Billion dollars a year we expect better from you.

Agrippa said...

Isn't it odd that the image of a gun captioned as being found at Atlanta in the November 28th "TSA Week in Review" is exactly the same as the image in the November 21st "TSA Week In Review"

Anonymous said...

TSAnonymous said...
"How long before the first "naked scanner" or "Screenshot taken" post?

wait for it...

November 28, 2014 at 6:53 PM"

Longer than you expect, TSAnonymous, due to your blotter team buddies delaying some critical comments approval.

Why are you so afraid of accurate comments of the TSA, their equipment and procedures? Why are you so afraid of the American public knowing the truth?

Anonymous said...

Hundreds of millions of passengers and a few chronic whiners. Keep up the great work TSA and secure those skies! America supports you.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement :)

Anonymous said...

On hiatus again blog team?

Arpit Roy said...

Raises a lot of questions, seriously !

Susan Richart said...

So what is going on with this blog "team?" I find it very hard to believe that West is the only person you have to post comments. But this is TSA-typical inefficiency at its finest, just like at MDW on Sunday.

On another topic, there is lots of good reading here:

https://radsec.org/secure1000-sec14.pdf

How much money was wasted and is being wasted still on NOS?

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Anonymous said...

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense. now you're even allowing college kids (kaydets) to endure more reasonable screening, but those who sacrificed for 20+ have to take their bloody shoes and belts off!!

Anonymous said...

Why do you post photos only of weapons when you also confiscate large bottles of liquids, toys, and items shaped like guns that are not made of metal and obviously not guns (e.g., gun-shaped fabric decals)? If you don't post photos of everything you confiscate, you mislead the public.

RB said...

Anonymous said...
Why do you post photos only of weapons when you also confiscate large bottles of liquids, toys, and items shaped like guns that are not made of metal and obviously not guns (e.g., gun-shaped fabric decals)? If you don't post photos of everything you confiscate, you mislead the public.

December 4, 2014 at 1:16 PM

...............
What is that you say? TSA misleads the public?

Like they did when TSA claimed the images from the Backscatter Strip Search Machines were suitable for viewing by young children.

TSA is known for one key thing and that is dishonesty when dealing with the public. Nothing stated by TSA is ever actually the full truth.

Just ask a hard question here and see what kind of answer you get if you get an answer at all.

Anonymous said...

Wow, sketchy much? What sort of conspiracies do you believe, son? Are you taking your medication?

Anonymous said...

Two former screeners - RB & Susan –post misleading information to outright lies, nice fantasy. But Millions of appreciative American flyers like myself represent reality and applaud the work you do. I fly dozens of times a year and never have had a negative interaction with TSA. People with agendas will find what they’re looking for; unfortunately at the expense of of us true patriots. Keep up the great work TSA!

screen shot/DHS OIG statement not necessary.

Truth or Consequences said...

West, please answer the questions above about the TSA (being caught) reusing photos from previous weeks. It was only a matter of time before you were caught (again) lying to the public.

What form of implausible deniability will you choose? Cut/paste "error?" "Same type of weapon so it doesn't matter?" Total silence?

RB said...

Anonymous said...Two former screeners - RB & Susan –post misleading information to outright lies, nice fantasy. But Millions of appreciative American flyers like myself represent reality and applaud the work you do. I fly dozens of times a year and never have had a negative interaction with TSA. People with agendas will find what they’re looking for; unfortunately at the expense of of us true patriots. Keep up the great work TSA!screen shot/DHS OIG statement not necessary.December 4, 2014 at 9:35 PM
●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●
Anon, claiiming that I have posted "misleading information to outright lies" impunes my character, clearly a personal attack.

Let me be clear about one thing, I am not now nor have I ever been an employee of TSA or an applicant for TSA employment. Any future claims of such by you will be preserved for possible action.

Since you are making such claims why don't you back up your claims with some facts.

A FOIA filing could reveal your identity.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said... unfortunately at the expense of of us true patriots. Keep up the great work TSA!

No.

A true patriot wouldn't agree with the TSA. A true patriot wouldn't discourage others from speaking up or speaking out. A true patriot would encourage everyone to stand up for their rights.

No. You are not true patriot.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
How long before the first "naked scanner" or "Screenshot taken" post?

wait for it...

My but aren't you eager to try and suppress the conversation. That kind of attitude means the truth is too close to comfort or that you are a bully and hoping to control the situation, probably because the truth is too close for your comfort.

Like someone said already, for $8B a year we expect better from TSA employees.

Anonymous said...

Truth or Consequences said...
West, please answer the questions above about the TSA (being caught) reusing photos from previous weeks. It was only a matter of time before you were caught (again) lying to the public.

What form of implausible deniability will you choose? Cut/paste "error?" "Same type of weapon so it doesn't matter?" Total silence?

December 5, 2014 at 6:24 AM
---------------------
I see nothing that states "This is an actual photo of the weapon we are talking about in this post."
The pics are illustrations of weapons. In many cases they are stock photos. Really? This is what you have to nitpick over?
Not everything is a conspiracy.

Anonymous said...

http://www.flyertalk.com/story/tsa-admits-to-being-underprepared-causing-holiday-travel-delays-in-chicago.html#comments

TSA Blames Poor Preparation for Holiday Travel Delays in Chicago, Disputes Reported Wait Times

"USA Today reports the TSA admitted it made scheduling errors in preparing for what is historically one of the busiest travel days of the year."

Just curious but how many TSM or higher personnel does TSA have on staff at Chicago Midway?

If these "TSA managers" can't plan for the busiest travel day of the year then why pay them? It's not like Thanksgivings Day is a secret or anything.

Calling Out Liars said...

West, why are you approving comments that you know contain lies, such as the lame TSAnonymous who thinks he's "funny" accusing RB and Susan of being "former screeners" and "disgruntled?"

You know who they are - you see them posting elsewhere and I'm sure you or one of your blotter team buddies have Googled them. Why are you allowing lies and baseless attacks by TSAnonymous posters being allowed through your moderation?

TSORon said...

A Riddler asked…
[[How many millions of non-threatening items such as water, shampoo, food, etc. we're seized from the 12,000,000+ people who flew last week?]]

Answer: None. TSA does not “seize” anything from passengers. Passengers are given options when a prohibited item is discovered, unless the item requires law enforcement intervention, options they can choose from. How they choose is their business, why is as well. Many choose to abandon the items at the TSA checkpoint, others make different choices. Each case and individual is different, so there is no telling what might happen. One think we know for sure, if it is truly a prohibited item it won’t be going through the checkpoint. What happens to it is up to the passenger.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous Anonymous said...
Two former screeners - RB & Susan –post

~~~

So you admit that you used to work with RB & Susan. Do your TSA bosses know you are posting on company time?

Joe Joe said...

TSAnonymous falsely claimed, "Two former screeners - RB & Susan –post misleading information to outright lies, nice fantasy. But Millions of appreciative American flyers like myself...
December 4, 2014 at 9:35 PM"


Why are you lying, TSAnonymous? Are you the same TSA employee recently posting as the Bold Blotter Intern? Now you're making false claims about RB and Susan in a lame attempt to discredit them. Are you approving your own comments or is West, Bob, or Lynn approving your comments?

Why do you pretend to be a non-TSA member of the flying public while at the same time falsely insisting you know that Susan and RB are former TSA screeners?

And why are you calling your fellow TSA employees "screeners" and not "officers?"

Wintermute said...

Anonymous...

"Two former screeners - RB & Susan..."

Two things. 1st, keep it up TSAnonymous. You only weaken your own arguments by spouting known lies. second, blog team, why was this comment approved, in violation of your posted guidelines?

Susan Richart said...

"Anonymous said...

Two former screeners - RB & Susan –post misleading information to outright lies, nice fantasy."

What might that misleading information or those outright lies be, Anonymous?

I wonder why the blog posts your comments about RB and me being "former screeners." According to the TOS, false allegations/accusations won't be posted. You are the one writing "outright lies."

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Raymond Gruel said...

I figured both Susan Richart and RB had to be former TSA employees with an ax to grind. They both hold such animus to the agency, even when the aviation system is the safest ever. It has become a ridiculous obsession with these folks. Just do not fly,the rest of us demand safety at 35,000 feet.

Anonymous said...

"Millions of appreciative American flyers like myself represent reality..."

Claiming to speak for millions undermines your credibility. Speaking for yourself is good enough. Relying on facts is a good strategy, too. You should try it.

To those who label TSA critics as paranoid, what label do you give to a government that treats every flyer as a terrorist? From Merriam-Webster:

paranoia - a tendency on the part of an individual or group toward excessive or irrational suspiciousness and distrustfulness of others

Sounds like DHS and TSA to me.

RB said...

Raymond Gruel said...
I figured both Susan Richart and RB had to be former TSA employees with an ax to grind. They both hold such animus to the agency, even when the aviation system is the safest ever. It has become a ridiculous obsession with these folks. Just do not fly,the rest of us demand safety at 35,000 feet.

December 8, 2014 at 11:42 AM
.....................
TSA does not make you safe at 35,000 feet.

TSA screeners miss 70% of target items when tested, by their own records.

TSA refuses to fully screen airport workers and they can easily introduce contraband and load it aboard your airplane.

TSA refuses to acknowledge that the Behavior Detection Program is not better than guessing as stated by the GAO.

TSA refuses to properly deploy its workforce and wastes time on things like gate checks, roving patrols in terminals (a law enforcement activity) and other useless activities.

My questin is why is TSA rated by its own employees near the bottom of all government agencies in employee satisfaction?

Why does TSA continue to restrict harmless LGA's as being to dangerous to fly but turns around and tosses those dangerous items into common trash bins right at the checkpoint?

Why does TSA continue to play games with travelers such as "State you Name" when doing so has no security benefit?

Why are so many TSA employees just generals aholes when dealing with the public?

You bet I have an axe to grind.

But, I am not now nor have I ever been an employee of TSA. I would shovel dung before I would work for TSA.

I am disgruntled because as a traveler who had a TSA employee who tried to steal from my family and TSA did nothing to address that event and even took action to cover up the event.

Or the TSA employee who nearly struck me after I refused to play the silly State Your Name interrogation game. Did TSA management do anything in that case? I can tell you that nothing was done.

Or the TSA screener who was loudly berrating people over how their bags were packed. Did TSA management care to do anything? NO.

TSA has no working process to respond and act on travelers complaints.

Go to the TSA website and look for a Report A Problem link. There is a TSA Contact Center but it doesn't say if it is to address problems or what and even then that contact goes to some company that has a contract with TSA, not directly to TSA. TSA is so incompetent that they can't even manage the communications from citizens.

TSA has no redeeming qualities and I will continue my efforts to bring change to TSA until I no longer breath.

TSA had their chance to win me over but the complete refusal to address my issues has created an enemy for life. That was a mistake on the part of TSA.

Susan Richart said...

Here we go yet again, Ronnie. Can you not read or are you not able to learn from what you do read:

"“All we’re permitted to do is confiscate the weapon and call law enforcement agents, who then will take custody of it and determine whether or not you’re arrested,” said Mr. Castelveter, who is part of the security agency’s effort to notify local news media to aggressively publicize reports of guns and other prohibited weapons being found at checkpoints."

The words "confiscate" and "seize", FYI, are synonymous.

You know full well that the TSA most often just takes items from passengers and tosses them in the trash, no questions asked.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Wintermute said...

Raymond Gruel said...

..."the rest of us demand safety at 35,000 feet."

Except, the TSA is not making us any safer, If anything, that false sense of security they are providing is making you LESS safe.

Anonymous said...

"“All we’re permitted to do is confiscate the weapon and call law enforcement agents, who then will take custody of it and determine whether or not you’re arrested,” said Mr. Castelveter, who is part of the security agency’s effort to notify local news media to aggressively publicize reports of guns and other prohibited weapons being found at checkpoints."

The words "confiscate" and "seize", FYI, are synonymous.

You know full well that the TSA most often just takes items from passengers and tosses them in the trash, no questions asked.
At no time ever, is TSA allowed to confiscate or sieze any item from a passenger. Doesnt matter if it is a gun or 3.5 ouces of water. TSA cannot, does not and may not ever seize or confiscate anything. All items that TSA takes posession of are abandoned by the passenger to TSA at their own free will or taken possesion of by law enforcment. It really is just that simple.

Anonymous said...

Items taken under duress by a government employee is a confiscation, Bold Blotter Intern. Ask your bosses and co-workers. They clearly state in TSA press releases and quotes that the flying public's private property is confiscated.

No one voluntarily leaves anything at a screening area.

Susan Richart said...

Sorry, Anonymous, you can write all you want about what the TSA is supposed to do, but I choose to believe David Castelveter, who also works for the TSA, but in a much higher position than you do, when he says that all the TSA can do is confiscate.

https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidcastelveter

The TSA refers to the objects it confiscates as "Voluntary Abandoned Property."

"If you’re not given these options, you should ask to speak with a supervisor or manager."

See, even the TSA itself acknowledges that people are many, many times not given options.

Take a look at the yearly recap provided to the media by the TSA on items taken at checkpoints. 99% of those articles use the word "confiscate" in them. Is that a coincidence? I doubt it.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement


Anonymous said...

"...or confiscate anything."

Tell that to the TSA Agent who confiscated my pocket knife last time I traveled. The agent told me "You can't fly with this, I have to confiscate it."

Maybe the agents should get a bit of training on how they get passengers to surrender things without them being confiscated.

Wintermute said...

TSAnonymous said...

"At no time ever, is TSA allowed to confiscate or sieze any item from a passenger. Doesnt matter if it is a gun or 3.5 ouces of water. TSA cannot, does not and may not ever seize or confiscate anything. All items that TSA takes posession of are abandoned by the passenger to TSA at their own free will or taken possesion of by law enforcment. It really is just that simple."

One cannot "abandon" something under duress (do you want to fly today?). Therefore, the proper term is, indeed, "confiscate" regardless of the word games you wish to play.

TSAalltheway said...

Sorry Wintermute but you are wrong. It is your option to fly, or drive or sail if you want to. you know the rules for driving i.e. Dont speed, stop at stop signs ect. If the public does not read up on the rules for flying and they leave items that can not go on the plane in their bags then they MAY(they have the option) leave the item behind in which case TSA will dispose of it for them. Those of you posting on this blog I would bet have some of the worst additudes when you fly so no wonder why you hate it so much.

RB said...

TSAalltheway said...Sorry Wintermute but you are wrong. It is your option to fly, or drive or sail if you want to. you know the rules for driving i.e. Dont speed, stop at stop signs ect. If the public does not read up on the rules for flying and they leave items that can not go on the plane in their bags then they MAY(they have the option) leave the item behind in which case TSA will dispose of it for them. Those of you posting on this blog I would bet have some of the worst additudes when you fly so no wonder why you hate it so much.December 16, 2014 at 10:48 AM
...................

Where exactly are all of the rules required of travelers to transit a TSA Checkpoint published.

banTheScanAmerica said...

@ TSAalltheway,

Actually, I used to love to go to airports. I used to love to fly. Then the TSA started assaulting and stealing and confiscating and humiliating and violating and touching and seizing and...

Still, I try to be civil with screeners or just ignore them entirely. And once I'm through your onerous and ridiculous rule-laden section of the airport, I continue on my way, being the polite, friendly, and helpful person I am every day.

Susan Richart said...

TSAalltheway wrote: "If the public does not read up on the rules for flying..."

You do know that the TSA does not publish all "the rules for flying" and that you apparently have the ability to determine at the checkpoint whether a passenger can take something with them or not.

How can we know the rules if the rules can be made up on the spur of the moment?

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Wintermute said...

Anonymous TSAalltheway said...
"Sorry Wintermute but you are wrong."
...
"If the public does not read up on the rules for flying and they leave items that can not go on the plane in their bags then they MAY(they have the option) leave the item behind in which case TSA will dispose of it for them."

Then show us ALL the TSA's Standard Operating Procedures. You can't, can you? And common sense doesn't work, either, because a plastic sword from Disney Land is obviously not a threat, yet not allowed to fly. Anyone calling one a "realistic" replica is, quite frankly, a moron. Yet TSA agents confiscate them and other similar "replicas" quite often.


"Those of you posting on this blog I would bet have some of the worst additudes when you fly so no wonder why you hate it so much."

Our attitudes when we fly is irrelevant. Last I checked, a bad attitude was not on the prohibited items list.

SSSS for Some Reason said...

RB said...Those of you posting on this blog I would bet have some of the worst additudes when you fly...

That is a bet I am pretty sure you would loose.

Jerry McClane said...

World is getting worse, and yet you can get guns in Oregon easily. It's so easy to transfer guns to someone else, and there isn't even a need for background check, huh.