Monday, November 24, 2014

TSA 2014 Holiday Travel Tips




Holiday Travel Banner
It’s that time of year again where we wonder where our summer went, and start gearing up for the holidays.

According to Airlines for America (A4A),  airports and airlines anticipate 24.6 million air travelers nationwide during the upcoming 12-day Thanksgiving travel period, a 1.5 percent increase over 2013. On an average day, TSA screens nearly 1.8 million travelers at 450 U.S. airports, including 3 million carry-on bags and 1.2 million checked bags.


With Thanksgiving comes the busiest travel season of the year, and with many infrequent or first-time travelers, we always like to offer a cornucopia of various travel tips and links to everything you might want to know prior to traveling.


Expedited Screening: TSA continues to expand TSA Pre✓®, which expedites checkpoint screening for known travelers and active duty service members, with similar benefits for passengers 12 and under and 75 and older. TSA Pre® is currently available at 123 airports. Remember, entering incorrect information can lead to not being selected for TSA Pre✓®. Visit dhs.gov/tt to learn more about trusted traveler programs that offer expedited screening.


Military Travel: TSA offers screening benefits for members of the U.S. Armed forces. As mentioned above, active duty service members and members of four United States Service Academies are eligible for expedited screening through TSA Pre®. Supply your DoD ID number as your Known Traveler Number on each reservation.


The MyTSA App: Want TSA information anywhere, anytime?  Use the MyTSA app. Use the  “Can I Bring My…” tool to enter the item you want to pack. It will tell you whether you can pack it in your carry-on or checked bag. This isn’t a Magic 8 Ball, so please don’t expect it to prophetically answer yes and no questions. A wait time feature is also available. It relies on crowd sourcing, which means the more people who use it, the better. 


Passenger Support: Call TSA Cares toll free at 1-855-787-2227 if you or a family member has a disability or medical condition with questions about screening policies, procedures and what to expect at the security checkpoint 72 hours prior to traveling. 


Wrapped gifts are allowed, but not encouraged: Wrapped gifts are allowed, but we recommend waiting until you land to wrap them. If there’s something in the gift that needs to be inspected, we may have to open it. Our officers try their best not to mangle the gift wrap, but it’s not a guarantee and it also slows down the line for everybody else when we have to do this. 


Liquids, Gels & Aerosols: If you’re checking a bag, make your life simple by packing liquids in your checked baggage. That way, you don’t have to worry about the liquids rules. You’re allowed to take as many 3.4 ounce or less sized containers that will fit in one sealed clear quart-sized zip-top bag – and one bag per person. Make sure you take the zip-top bag out of your carry-on prior to sending it through the X-ray.


Here is some information on liquid, aerosol and gel items:

  • Deodorant: Stick deodorant is not limited to 3.4 oz or less, but gel or spray deodorant i
  • Makeup: Any liquid makeup cosmetics such as eyeliner, nail polish, liquid foundation, etc., should be placed in the baggie. That goes for perfume as well. Powder makeup is fine.
  • Beverages: Wine, liquor, beer and all of your favorite beverages are permitted in your checked baggage. You can also bring beverages packaged in 3.4 oz or less bottles in your carry-on bags in the 3-1-1 baggie.
  • Foods: Cakes, pies, bread, donuts, turkeys, etc., are all permitted. Read the list of foods that should be placed in your checked bags or shipped if they don’t comply with the carry-on rules. 

Dry Ice: Find out how to travel with dry ice to keep your favorite Thanksgiving vittles preserved while traveling.


Shaving Razors: Certain razors are permitted. Know which ones you can fly with in this blog post


Forgotten or Lost IDs: If you have lost or forgotten your ID, you will still be permitted to fly as long as you help us verify you are who you say you are by answering a few questions.   


Medication: One of the more popular questions we get from travelers is: “Can I travel with my medication?” The answer is yes, with some qualifiers.


Traveling With Children: Did you know that children 12 and under can keep their shoes on? Read about the screening process how to best pack for your child.


Traveling With a Pet: Contact your airline first to ask about requirements, fees, or restrictions they might have. Read about going through screening with your pet.


Jewelry: Read about the best practices when going through security with your jewelry. There are a few different choices that you can make based on what kind of jewelry it is.  


Double Check: If you’re grabbing a bag, suitcase, briefcase, jacket and other items you haven’t used in a while, be sure to give them the onceover so you don’t accidentally take something prohibited through the checkpoint. Many people who have brought guns, ammunition, knives, and other prohibited item say that they did so unknowingly.


Lose Something? Contact the airport lost and found. Tape your business card or contact info to your valuable electronics. Not only does this help us contact you if you lose your items, but it prevents travelers from grabbing the wrong item by mistake. 


Of course, you can always contact TSA with questions and feedback.


Phone: 1-866-289-9673

Email: TSA-ContactCenter@tsa.dhs.gov
Hours: Weekdays 8 a.m. – 11 p.m. ET

Weekends/Holidays: 9 a.m. – 8 p.m. ET



Happy Holidays!


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If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact us by clicking here.

48 comments:

Anonymous said...

Why is "Pre-Check" not the default level of screening for ALL passengers, rather than a perk doled out to the wealthy, elite, and lucky?

If your naked body scanners are, as you've been claiming for so many years, a vital part of airport security, why do you keep exempting entire classes of passengers from having to go through them?

SSSS for Some Reason said...

"... On an average day, TSA screens nearly 1.8 million travelers at 450 U.S. airports, "

That is, on an average week, over 12 million passengers screened.

That many people a week and your inefficient and overly invasive nudie scanners can't find anything and you catch, on average, about 40 firearms?

Hardly seems like we need an eight billion dollar a year agency to protect us from so little.

RB said...

How many cupcakes will TSA steal this year?

TWIC Holder said...

Would be great if TSA could off an option for TWIC card holders to get a KTN while they are at the UEC.

Anonymous said...

"On an average day, TSA screens nearly 1.8 million travelers at 450 U.S. airports, "

That is, on an average week, over 12 million passengers screened.

That many people a week and your inefficient and overly invasive nudie scanners can't find anything and you catch, on average, about 40 firearms?

Hardly seems like we need an eight billion dollar a year agency to protect us from so little."

It only takes one.
I would bet TSA finds more guns than the police catch armed robbers in a week per capita. Should we stop look for robbers as well? Your statement is just rediculous.

Anonymous said...

Are you A Cupcake?

Agrippa said...

Ok, TSA screens at 450 airports while Pre Check is only available at 123 airports.

What is that, only about 27% of all airports serviced by TSA have Pre Check.

That's the same as having a cell phone that only works in 14 states. Who would buy a cell phone that only works in a few certain states while being required to under go a close scrutinity of their personal lives and even then that cell phone can be disabled at any moment by government?

Pre Check is nothing more than a way to silence desent and to many self centered people have taken the bait.

Anonymous said...

Mr/Ms Anonymous: I am not wealthy, nor am I elite, but I consider myself lucky. Delta processed my husband and me because after saving our pennies for years and years and years, we are lucky enough to fly back and forth to Italy on a regular basis now, as retirees. I have been scanned so many times, it's dizzying, but I've never been offended by even one TSA person. Maybe it's just the whiners who get easily offended...

Anonymous said...

There are more than a few firearms confiscated monthly by TSA. If one goes off in an aircraft and punctures the skin of the plane, I can assure you, that you will wish it had been discovered. I have not always had a perfect baggage arrival due to mishandling by TSA contractors, but the reality is that I want to know I am going to arrive alive, with as close to 100% success as I can get. Thanks for the blog Bob B...good advice to double check that "little used" luggage before checking in.

Freedom Is Patriotic said...

Wow, the deafness and blindness of so many recently TSA recruited "public citizens!"

As well as a visit from the Bold TSAnonymous intern. You almost spelled everything correctly. Let's work on punctuation next.

Let's remember that if you haven't encountered a power-mad screener and if you're ok with TSA *government employees* (only a few airports have contractors and or tac dollars pay for them all) damaging your private property, many Americans are not. We are using our Constitutional rights to call out government misconduct and demand better work and policies from our government.

Think about that. Some of you are trying to discourage Americans from interacting with a govt allegedly by the people.

Arippa said...

Anonymous said...There are more than a few firearms confiscated monthly by TSA. If one goes off in an aircraft and punctures the skin of the plane, I can assure you, that you will wish it had been discovered. I have not always had a perfect baggage arrival due to mishandling by TSA contractors, but the reality is that I want to know I am going to arrive alive, with as close to 100% success as I can get. Thanks for the blog Bob B...good advice to double check that "little used" luggage before checking in.November 21, 2014 at 7:10 PM
.................................
A bullet puncturing the skin of the airplane won't do squat. No explosive decompression, not rapid decompession, not even normal decompression.

If what you think would happen then why are some pilots and all Federal Air Marshals allowed to have guns on airplanes?

You need to cut back on the fiction found in movies and on TV.

Anonymous said...

Freedom Is Patriotic said...
Wow, the deafness and blindness of so many recently TSA recruited "public citizens!"

As well as a visit from the Bold TSAnonymous intern. You almost spelled everything correctly. Let's work on punctuation next.

Let's remember that if you haven't encountered a power-mad screener and if you're ok with TSA *government employees* (only a few airports have contractors and or tac dollars pay for them all) damaging your private property, many Americans are not. We are using our Constitutional rights to call out government misconduct and demand better work and policies from our government.

Think about that. Some of you are trying to discourage Americans from interacting with a govt allegedly by the people.

Sorry, I didn't realize spelling counted or was an important issue on such an informal forum as this. Please accept my appologies. Wait, one "p" or two?
By the way, as long as we are checking and counting spelling, what are "tac" dollars? Are you Mr.Pot or Mr. Kettle?

Anonymous said...

"It only takes one."

Yes. It takes only one person to sneak a gun past TSA* and get pummeled by on-board passengers, taken down by an air marshal, or knocked off their feet by pilot maneuvers when that one person tries to break into the cockpit and hijack the plane.

*Red Team reports say TSA actually misses 70%, but let's ignore that for a moment.

"I would bet TSA finds more guns than the police catch armed robbers in a week per capita.

Link to evidence, please.

"Maybe it's just the whiners who get easily offended..."

Were you not offended?

"There are more than a few firearms confiscated monthly by TSA. If one goes off in an aircraft and punctures the skin of the plane..."

Expand your research beyond action movies.

TeslaTours said...

These are the great and useful list of tips. One must have to consider it while traveling. Many Thanks for sharing it with us.

Anonymous said...

To all the crybabies and idiots who comment on this site. Have a wonderful and safe holiday season. It is clear from your comments that none of you have been in an airport in years.

Sandra said...

" Anonymous Anonymous said...

To all the crybabies and idiots who comment on this site. Have a wonderful and safe holiday season. It is clear from your comments that none of you have been in an airport in years."

Would you care to make a wager on that ridiculous statement?

screen shot

Colm Barry said...

I am actually surprised to see you expect more holiday (air) travelers than a year before. With Ebola fears I would have expected much the opposite, as with SARS we had a noticeable dent in passenger numbers, and SARS was by far not as feared as Ebola.

Anonymous said...

Sandra - Yes.

Anonymous said...

I love all the paranoid "Screenshot taken" stuff. Too funny!

Anonymous said...

Thank you for keeping us safe over the Holidays TSA. The vast majority of passengers appreciate your efforts.

Freedom is Patriotic said...

Funny.The Bold Blotter TSA intern who posts anonymously suddenly can spell and use punctuation. Methinks this govt employee has been trying to trick the American taxpayer by pretending to be a low-paid, poorly educated newbie rather than Blotter Bob.

Bob, obviously your bosses aren't allowing you to respond to comments as yourself, so you pretend to be someone else to get around their rule. This is unethical and pathetic.

So sad our tax dollars are wasted on your lies to the American public.

Susan Richart said...

Anonymous/TSA employee poster, why not consolidate all your comments into one post rather than 3 consecutive comments in less than 2-3 minutes?

BTW, are you using a DHS computer to post your comments? I guess it would be too much for the bloggers to check IP addresses of incoming comments, wouldn't it, and to report those who are using DHS computers?

Screen shot/DHS OIG statement

RB said...

Anonymous said...
I love all the paranoid "Screenshot taken" stuff. Too funny!

November 27, 2014 at 6:25 AM
..................
It's odd that you find censorship of citizens communications to government on a taxpayer funded website operated by government employees to be funny.

It is in fact an illegal act and a violation of the citizens First Amendment Rights that should result in the dismissal of the employee from government service then charged, tried, and sentenced to jail.

Anonymous said...

Funny.The Bold Blotter TSA intern who posts anonymously suddenly can spell and use punctuation. Methinks this govt employee has been trying to trick the American taxpayer by pretending to be a low-paid, poorly educated newbie rather than Blotter Bob.

I can assure you, I am not blotter Bob.
I am also paid very well, very well educated and not even that new. As per usual, you are wrong again.

Anonymous said...

Mr/Ms Anonymous: I have been scanned so many times, it's dizzying, but I've never been offended by even one TSA person. Maybe it's just the whiners who get easily offended...

you can bet you are in the majority, not the minority. There will always be a select few who complain about anything and everything. These are the same people who had their lunch money stolen in school, got picked last for the kickball team and now drive a Prius. They believe in freesom of speech as long as you agree with them. And any slight inconvienence to them as an absolute waste of time and money. The mis quote and apply statistics to places they were not intended. The key to their success is taking things out of context. They like to hear themselves talk for the sake of talking.

Anonymous said...

BTW, are you using a DHS computer to post your comments? I guess it would be too much for the bloggers to check IP addresses of incoming comments, wouldn't it, and to report those who are using DHS computers?

would that be a crime to use a government computer to access a government website? Or are you just in favor of censorship of certain people?

Anonymous said...

Keep up the outstanding work TSA. Millions of passengers support and appreciate your efforts. Susan and RB are just a couple former disgruntled screeners.

Anonymous said...

RB said…
“It's odd that you find censorship of citizens communications to government on a taxpayer funded website operated by government employees to be funny.

It is in fact an illegal act and a violation of the citizens First Amendment Rights that should result in the dismissal of the employee from government service then charged, tried, and sentenced to jail.”


I’m not sure why you get so angry when people don’t agree with your opinion. The issue you are referencing is Government Speech vs Public Forum. This legal debate has been going for more than ten years. While you would have a great case that this is a Public Forum if it was held on Facebook, I think a lawyer would be hard pressed to prove that Google’s Blogger platform is anything other than Government Speech.

However, there is no case law on this issue (as far as I have known). The only cases known to me involved state and local government. Both cases also only involved moderated Facebook pages.

You should file a federal law suit RB. Only then, would you have a definitive answer if this is a Public Forum and should fall under the Public Forum Doctrine. I think due to this ambiguity in law, is why the DHS IG throws your statements into the trash. Of course, this is just my opinion and should not be considered as legal advice. <---- obvious disclaimer :)

Anonymous said...

West, why are you approving comments by anonymous TSA employees who insult the American public and commenters here in clear violation of blog rules?

Anonymous said...

Hey West, did you approve three comments in a row on a holiday weekend from the Bold Blotter Intern?

Odd how several anonymous comments by a TSA employee and his friends were approved in less than 24 hours on a holiday weekend, when comments by the real American public have to wait for days to get comments approved.

Shame on this blotter's insular, elitist attitude!

RB said...

 Anonymous said...Keep up the outstanding work TSA. Millions of passengers support and appreciate your efforts. Susan and RB are just a couple former disgruntled screeners.November 28, 2014 at 6:46 PM
==========================
I have never been an applicant or employee of TSA or any other screening form.

I write here for a few very simple reasons. Attempted theft by a TSA screener at FLL that was never addressed by TSA and covered up by the FLL FSD. Also for incidents at DFW and LAS where complaints met deaf TSA ears.

I will continue to speak out against TSA at every opportunity.

Besides, I have more respect for myself than to ever consider TSA to be an honorable way to make a buck!

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...

"would that be a crime to use a government computer to access a government website?"

Actually, while not a crime, it's likely a violation of "acceptable use" policy.

"Or are you just in favor of censorship of certain people?"

No, but we are against TSA employees posing as members of the general public when they post here.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said... Susan and RB are just a couple former disgruntled screeners.

You know this because you used to work with them?

Anonymous said...

"These are the same people who had their lunch money stolen in school, got picked last for the kickball team and now drive a Prius. They believe in freesom of speech as long as you agree with them. And any slight inconvienence to them as an absolute waste of time and money. The mis quote and apply statistics to places they were not intended. The key to their success is taking things out of context. They like to hear themselves talk for the sake of talking."

So many statements based on no facts whatsoever... Very illogical way of arguing! But now I am certain you work for TSA in some sort of administrative capacity.

Wintermute said...

Anonymous said...
"Keep up the outstanding work TSA. Millions of passengers support and appreciate your efforts. Susan and RB are just a couple former disgruntled screeners."

According to the GAO, the TSA's work is anything but "outstanding," unless there's a new definition I'm not aware of ;) A 70% failure rate, only counting false negatives (because the TSA does not track false positives), I'd call that a failure.

As for the rest of your comment, you have proof of this?

Anonymous said...

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense. now you're even allowing college kids (kaydets) to endure more reasonable screening, but those who sacrificed for 20+ have to take their bloody shoes and belts off!!

Anonymous said...

some additional suggestions for TSA to make our Christmas travel and security experience as convenient as possible:

1) eliminate TSA and return to pre-911 screening. the TSA makes things no more secure, and arguably less secure, since the last red team results made available to the public indicate that TSA is allowing 70% of prohibited items through, as opposed to 60% or lower in testing of the old systems. in addition, the 911 attacks focused on 2 gaps in security: unsecured cockpit doors, and the training of flight crews and passengers to be compliant. both of those are now corrected - no one is going to take over an airliner with a penknife.

2) full and total transparency of all DHS and TSA regulations, rules, procedures, and watch/no-fly lists, as well as public comment periods for new rules, and an independent appeal process for those placed on no fly or terrorist watch lists (as ordered by the federal courts, but still not implemented).

3) eliminate the Pre-Bribe, er, Pre-Check program. it is a waste of taxpayer dollars as well as flat out insulting to be required to pay to have a background check done in order to be screened in a semi-sane way, when I hold a security clearance and a concealed weapons permit, both of which require a more thorough background check than TSA is likely to do.

4) eliminate ID requirements. it is unConstitutional (freedom to travel domestically is not guaranteed only if the govt can ID you), and it contributes nothing to security. what does it matter if you know my name, if I am carrying a bomb? why is my name any damn business of yours if I am not carrying a bomb or
intending some kind of threat?

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
BTW, are you using a DHS computer to post your comments? I guess it would be too much for the bloggers to check IP addresses of incoming comments, wouldn't it, and to report those who are using DHS computers?

would that be a crime to use a government computer to access a government website? Or are you just in favor of censorship of certain people?

November 28, 2014 at 11:25 AM
...................
Using government computers to access non-work related websites could very well be a violation.

Are TSA employees allowed to surf the web while at work? If the answer is no then posting on the TSA blog probably is an activity that is not permitted.

Why don't you tell your supervisor what you are doing and see if it is ok.

Anonymous said...

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense. now you're even allowing college kids (kaydets) to endure more reasonable screening, but those who sacrificed for 20+ have to take their bloody shoes and belts off!!

Anonymous said...

some additional suggestions for TSA to make our holiday travel and security experience as convenient as possible:

1) eliminate TSA and return to pre-911 screening. the TSA makes things no more secure, and arguably less secure, since the last red team results made available to the public indicate that TSA is allowing 70% of prohibited items through, as opposed to 60% or lower in testing of the old systems. in addition, the 911 attacks focused on 2 gaps in security: unsecured cockpit doors, and the training of flight crews and passengers to be compliant. both of those are now corrected - no one is going to take over an airliner with a penknife.

2) full and total transparency of all DHS and TSA regulations, rules, procedures, and watch/no-fly lists, as well as public comment periods for new rules, and an independent appeal process for those placed on no fly or terrorist watch lists (as ordered by the federal courts).

3) eliminate the Pre-Bribe, er, Pre-Check program. it is a waste of taxpayer dollars as well as flat out insulting to be required to pay to have a background check done in order to be screened in a semi-sane way, when I hold a security clearance and a concealed weapons permit, both of which require a more thorough background check than TSA is likely to do.

4) eliminate ID requirements. it is unConstitutional (freedom to travel domestically is not guaranteed only if the govt can ID you), and it contributes nothing to security. what does it matter if you know my name, if I am carrying a bomb? why is my name any damn business of yours if I am not carrying a bomb or
intending some kind of threat?

RB said...

Anonymous said...RB said…I’m not sure why you get so angry when people don’t agree with your opinion. The issue you are referencing is Government Speech vs Public Forum. This legal debate has been going for more than ten years. While you would have a great case that this is a Public Forum if it was held on Facebook, I think a lawyer would be hard pressed to prove that Google’s Blogger platform is anything other than Government Speech.However, there is no case law on this issue (as far as I have known). The only cases known to me involved state and local government. Both cases also only involved moderated Facebook pages.You should file a federal law suit RB. Only then, would you have a definitive answer if this is a Public Forum and should fall under the Public Forum Doctrine. I think due to this ambiguity in law, is why the DHS IG throws your statements into the trash. Of course, this is just my opinion and should not be considered as legal advice. <---- obvious disclaimer :)November 29, 2014 at 10:50 AM
☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆

I believe the courts including the USSC have heard and decided any number or Free Speech cases, not to mention the First Amendment to the Constitution which the Courts have held to apply to all of government. The TSA blog is not a privately own website regadless that it is hosted on Blogger. It is a federal government operation, operated by government employees, and financed with tax dollars. I don't think anyone can make a valid argument defending censorship by these government employees and I believe that those employees engaged in censorship have violated not only the Oaths they took as government employees but are violating the civil rights of citizens. It is clear to me that TSA employees have no personal honor or they would refuse to do these wrongs.

I'm not angry with those who disagree with me. I do my best to state a position and to defend that position. I do get angry with those that won't stand up for their rights and allows the criminal acts of TSA employees to go unchallenged.

Abusive screeners, thugs, drug dealers, rapist, kiddy porn users, thieves, child sex abusers, and more are all well represented in the ranks of TSA.

Ask TSA about the ex-priest at Philly. Ask TSA what happened to the TSA employees that held Stacey Amato hostage. Ask TSA what happened to the TSA screeners who strip searched three elderly ladies at Kennedy. Or what happened to any TSA screener who used TSA's invasive pat down on young children. Or how about the incident at Atlanta where screener pulled a young ladies dress down exposing her breast?

All of these things just scratch the surface yet TSA does nothing to clean up its act.

You defend these TSA people, I will not!

Anonymous said...

RB - Your tired old comments put us to sleep.

Coffee Cafe said...

The Bold Blotter Intern wrote, "I can assure you, I am not blotter Bob.
I am also paid very well, very well educated and not even that new. As per usual, you are wrong again.

November 28, 2014 at 11:14 AM"


Are you not Blotter Bob because you are "paid very well" or because you're "very well educated"?

If you're very well educated, why are you working for the TSA?

You say you're "very well paid", but the TSA "Pay Bands" page http://www.tsa.gov/careers/pay-bands does not back up your assertion.

If you are at one of the top pay bands and are not a new employee, why would you post anonymously on this blog and conceal your alleged education and pay by using poor spelling and grammar?

Why would any government employee who is "very well paid" and "very well educated" anonymously attack the taxpaying American public on a government website?

Coffee Cafe said...

Hey, Bold Blotter Intern, it's been six days. Why haven't you written and approved your rude reply yet?

Wintermute said...

TSAnonymous said...

"RB - Your tired old comments put us to sleep."

I don't always agree with everything RB says, but at least he don't commit logical fallacies ;)

Coffee Cafe said...

I guess the Bold Blotter Intern ran away. Twelve days since I asked very simple questions.

Anonymous said...

To the other anonymous, in order to access govt computer systems, everyone must now have at least a Secret clearance. Illegal immigrants would not pass that check. I am retired military and have current TS/SCI clearance as a contractor. But I still had to go in for a TSA interview, give my prints, show my passport, watch a video, and undergo a background investigation to get approved for Global Entry, not Pre Check. PC approval goes along with successful GE application. I don't agree with people being able to just pay for PC unless they provide all the same information I did for GE. But having that extra personal information reduces risk and supports expedited processing over casual or infrequent flyers. The real problem with TSA is them allowing totally unscreened travelers to enter PC check lines without any of the up front work to determine their identity. They get to go thru the detuned metal detectors with their shoes and coats on without proving their identity and reliability like I had to. We are not the wealthy, elite. We are people who had $100 bucks for the GE application and reap the benefits of spending it that way. Just because I retired with 34 years does not mean I haven't changed somehow. And TSA does not have access to my current investigation info.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
To the other anonymous, in order to access govt computer systems, everyone must now have at least a Secret clearance.
-----------------------------
100% incorrect. numerous active duty never receive a clearance or Secret access, but use govt computers every work day. I am less familiar with GS processes, but I work in a building that is 99% unclas, and I doubt very much that those sporting the "Unclassified only" badges have Secret clearances.
----------------------------------
I am retired military and have current TS/SCI clearance as a contractor. But I still had to go in for a TSA interview, give my prints, show my passport, watch a video, and undergo a background investigation to get approved for Global Entry, not Pre Check. PC approval goes along with successful GE application. I don't agree with people being able to just pay for PC unless they provide all the same information I did for GE.
---------------------------------
but the point is exactly that the US Govt has already DONE that due diligence on you (and me). you shouldn't have to pay anything, or jump through any hoops.
--------------------------------
But having that extra personal information reduces risk and supports expedited processing over casual or infrequent flyers.
The real problem with TSA is them allowing totally unscreened travelers to enter PC check lines without any of the up front work to determine their identity. They get to go thru the detuned metal detectors with their shoes and coats on without proving their identity and reliability like I had to.
---------------------------------
that is another key point. none of the prescreening does anything to reduce risk if people are randomly shifted around, and if the same level of screening is not applied to airport and airline employees (and we know it isn't).
TSA is following completely arbitrary procedures that do not make us safer, and do benefit some over others for no apparent reason. that is what I am trying to highlight here!!!