Friday, October 24, 2014

TSA Week in Review - 51 Firearms Discovered This Week (And One Unloaded Cannon)


loaded firearm
Loaded firearm discovered at MLB
51 Firearms Discovered This Week – Of the 51 firearms, 39 were loaded and 13 had rounds chambered. 

Cannon Barrel - You can add this one to the “items we don’t see every day” category. An unloaded cannon barrel was discovered along with a passenger’s checked items at the Kahului Airport (OGG). Our officers have discovered cannonballs in the past, but this is the first cannon I can recall.  


discovered cannon barrel
Cannon Barrel (OGG)
Inert Ordnance and Grenades etc. – We continue to find inert grenades and other weaponry on a weekly basis. Please keep in mind that if an item looks like a real bomb, grenade, mine, etc., it is prohibited. When these items are found at a checkpoint or in checked baggage, they can cause significant delays because the explosives detection professionals must resolve the alarm to determine the level of threat. Even if they are novelty items, you cannot bring them on a plane.  Read here on why inert items cause problems.
  • An inert hand grenade was discovered in a carry-on bag at Dallas Fort Worth (DFW).
Artfully Concealed Prohibited Items – It’s important to examine your bags prior to traveling to ensure you are not carrying prohibited items. If a prohibited item is discovered in your bag or on your body, you could be cited and possibly arrested by local law enforcement. Here are a few examples from this week where prohibited items were found by our officers in strange places.
  • Two concealed six-inch knives were detected in a traveler’s shoes at Tallahassee (TLH).

discovered knives in boots
Knives in boot at (TLH)
What Not to Say at an Airport – Statements like these not only delay the people who said them but can also inconvenience many other passengers if the checkpoint or terminal has to be evacuated:
  • A Miami (MIA) traveler informed the airline ticketing representative that he had C4 explosives in his checked bag. His bag was located and after all was said and done, no C4 was discovered.
discovered marijuana
Marijuana (SFO)

Stun Guns – 12 stun guns were discovered in carry-on bags this week at Atlanta (ATL), Billings (BIL), Buffalo (BUF), Burbank (BUR), Columbia (CAE), Kansas City (MCI), Los Angeles (LAX), Northwest Florida (VPS), Oakland (OAK), Orlando (MCO), Phoenix (PHX), and San Diego (SAN).
Marijuana at SFO - Several plastic-wrapped packs of marijuana totaling six pounds were discovered in a carry-on bag at San Francisco (SFO). Our officers are looking primarily for weapons, but when they come across drugs, they must be reported to local law enforcement.

Miscellaneous Prohibited Items In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons and many other prohibited items too numerous to note.



discovered knives
Top - Bottom: Knives Discovered at LAS, LAS & JFK
Ammunition – When packed properly, ammunition can be transported in your checked baggage, but it is never permissible to pack ammo in your carry-on bag.

discovered ammunition
Ammunition discovered in carry-on bag at JFK

discovered loaded firearms
(Clockwise from top left) Loaded Firearms Discovered in Carry-on Bags at: RNO, DAL, FLL & AUS

table of firearms discovered in carry-on bags
*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates.

You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms. Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $7,500. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions, that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

If you haven’t seen it yet, make sure you check out our TSA Blog Year in Review for 2013. You can also check out 2011 & 2012 as well.

Follow @TSABlogTeam on Twitter and Instagram!


If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact us by clicking here.


63 comments:

Anonymous said...

To not list the canon's caliber is a missed opportunity.

Chris Boyce said...

Since pot is non-metallic, just exactly what prompted your clerks to conduct a bag search? I know, they "saw something..."

I hope this guy has a good lawyer.

You must be proud.

Anonymous said...

You found an unloaded cannon in checked luggage, cute, but why is that not allowed? It looks more of a relic/antique rather than anything that warrants publication. I thought unloaded rifles were ok so why is transporting this antique any business of the general public? If you are trying to show you are actually protecting the public, then rooting through luggage to display curiosities does not seem appropriate. If there is a problem, please state what should have been done.

Anonymous said...

What was the disposition of the small cannon? If this item had any historical importance it could be of significant value. Surely TSA wasn't so stupid to confiscate the cannon.

SSSS for Some Reason said...

First question.... was the cannon allowed to fly? If not, why not?

Second question... Artfully concealed? Hardly. Its a knife poking out of a boot. It is only concealed by strictest definition of the word.

I know you guys think you have it tough because you have to get it right every single time and the bad guys only have to get it right once. But you aren't even getting right at all. You are too busy inspecting antique cannons in checked baggage and inspecting false positives from the nudie-scanners to accomplish anything more than the incredibly small percentage of things you post about here in your weekly blotter. All of this stuff represents about 1 percent of 1 percent from the number of travellers you screened this week. And since none of the items were actually a threat to commercial aviation you shouldn't try and sound so proud of what you've done.

Anonymous said...

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense.

Anonymous said...

some suggestions for TSA to make our travel and security experience as convenient as possible:

1) eliminate TSA and return to pre-911 screening. the TSA makes things no more secure, and arguably less secure, since the last red team results made available to the public indicate that TSA is allowing 70% of prohibited items through, as opposed to 60% or lower in testing of the old systems. in addition, the 911 attacks focused on 2 gaps in security: unsecured cockpit doors, and the training of flight crews and passengers to be compliant. both of those are now corrected - no one is going to take over an airliner with a penknife.

2) full and total transparency of all DHS and TSA regulations, rules, procedures, and watch/no-fly lists, as well as public comment periods for new rules, and an independent appeal process for those placed on no fly or terrorist watch lists (as ordered by the federal courts).

3) eliminate the Pre-Bribe, er, Pre-Check program. it is a waste of taxpayer dollars as well as flat out insulting to be required to pay to have a background check done in order to be screened in a semi-sane way, when I hold a security clearance and a concealed wepaons permit, both of which require a more thorough background check than TSA is likely to do.

4) eliminate ID requirements. it is unConstitutional (freedom to travel domestically is not guaranteed only if the govt can ID you), and it contributes nothing to security. what does it matter if you know my name, if I am carrying a bomb? why is my name any damn business of yours if I am not carrying a bomb or
intending some kind of threat?

Anonymous said...

As always, absolutely nothing you needed your slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners to detect. Meanwhile, how many people suffered physical searches thanks to false alarms on these useless machines?

Why are Curtis Burns and West Cooper unwilling to address, let alone answer, that question?

How many weeks has it been since you last trumpeted something dangerous you found with the naked body scanners?

Anonymous said...

Why does the TSA blog allow comments if the comments aren't posted in a timely manner?

Seriously, what's the point TSA?

Anonymous said...

"Several plastic-wrapped packs of marijuana totaling six pounds were discovered in a carry-on bag at San Francisco (SFO). Our officers are looking primarily for weapons, but when they come across drugs, they must be reported to local law enforcement."

So how did TSA spot the marijuana in the first place?

Sam Cheyne said...

I have been watching this report for over a year now and I am shaking my head in disbelief as to the number of guns - Loaded/Unloaded, knives and other items. Why isn't there more enforcement of these prohibited items? A sign at the front of the Security line before they enter the area is one idea, but how do you conscientiously have a known weapon and then get caught?

The number gets bigger and bigger every week. Even fake guns, and other weapons should be taken more seriously....

Sam Cheyne
Seattle, WA

Anonymous said...

Wouldn't an unloaded cannon barrel basically be a tube? Was the passenger be allowed to keep it? It was in checked luggage so no one would have access to it. It isn't a firearm like a pistol or rifle and they probably don't make locked cased for it anyway.

I know you guys need to inspect it but I'm wondering if it was permitted. If it's in checked luggage without cannon balls and gunpowder, it basically is a tube or pipe.

Anonymous said...

Has West being quarantined for Ebola in a tent with no internet access? No comments posted since about last Wednesday. Once again, great job, TSA Blog.

GSOLTSO said...

Anon sez - Has West being quarantined for Ebola in a tent with no internet access? No comments posted since about last Wednesday. Once again, great job, TSA Blog.

Not yet, but the day is still young. I am in a different status the next couple of weeks and have limited computer access this, so moderation will continue, but I am not going to be able to comment much back and forth. It is truly wonderful to be missed gang! I will back to address comments and follow up hopefully by the middle of next week.

West
TSA Blog Team

RB said...

"Our officers are looking primarily for weapons, but when they come across drugs, they must be reported to local law enforcement."

So by admission of a TSA employee TSA isn't looking strictly for WEI.

That seems to be a clear violation of a Limited Administrative Search and violative of travelers civil rights.

RB said...

GSOLTSO said...
Anon sez - Has West being quarantined for Ebola in a tent with no internet access? No comments posted since about last Wednesday. Once again, great job, TSA Blog.

Not yet, but the day is still young. I am in a different status the next couple of weeks and have limited computer access this, so moderation will continue, but I am not going to be able to comment much back and forth. It is truly wonderful to be missed gang! I will back to address comments and follow up hopefully by the middle of next week.

West
TSA Blog Team

October 28, 2014 at 4:31 PM
............
And you are now the only TSA employee moderating comments?

Anonymous said...

I never said I missed you, West.

5doogs said...

I find it totaly irresponsible & unthinkable for any one to forget they are carrying a hand gun befor entering a airport & attempting to board a airplane in this social environment! "oh, I forgot I was packing!" .... Just dose NOT cut it in today's world! If it's that casual, perhaps you have no business owning a gun in the first place... Who are these folks? Citizens must carry the responsibility if they want to carry the wepon, be it knife, gun, or anything they know will make a flight uncomfortable for the rest of the passengers & the law...

Anonymous said...

"And since none of the items were actually a threat to commercial aviation you shouldn't try and sound so proud of what you've done."

How do you know this?

Anonymous said...

"As always, absolutely nothing you needed your slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners to detect. Meanwhile, how many people suffered physical searches thanks to false alarms on these useless machines?"

I thought your cut and paste question was adressed last week.

"Why are Curtis Burns and West Cooper unwilling to address, let alone answer, that question?"

Probably tired of hearing the same boring question every week.

"How many weeks has it been since you last trumpeted something dangerous you found with the naked body scanners?"

Its not always about "finding" something as much as it is about preventing the attempt.

I look forward to reading the exact same question next week...NOT.

Anonymous said...

TSA records another week of success. Numerous possible threat items not allowed on a plane and zero terror attempts on a US based commercial flight. Imagine if TSA had the same failure rate as other government agencies like CBP and ICE.

Anonymous said...

Sam Cheyne said...The number gets bigger and bigger every week. Even fake guns, and other weapons should be taken more seriously...."

No. The number stays relatively constant at between 40 and 50 handguns per week. That is less than one percent of one percent of the number of passengers screened for the same average week.

Yes, the TSA found some prohibited items. That is the most basic of their claimed functions so why do they try and claim so much success from the most basic part of their job? There are no gold stars presented to those who do their job. The gold stars are given to those who excel, who go above and beyond their jobs. And the TSA does not go above and beyond. Ever.

SSSS for Some Reason said...

5doogs said... Citizens must carry the responsibility if they want to carry the wepon, be it knife, gun, or anything they know will make a flight uncomfortable for the rest of the passengers & the law..."

So adults doing legal things make you uncomfortable?

In the state of Arizona it is legal to carry your firearm with you just about everywhere. Except the airport. Inside the so-called sterile area specifically because you can carry your firearm in the public areas legally.

Are you honestly suggesting those people not carry a firearm around the airport because you might be uncomfortable?

RB said...

GSOLTSO said...
Anon sez - Has West being quarantined for Ebola in a tent with no internet access? No comments posted since about last Wednesday. Once again, great job, TSA Blog.

Not yet, but the day is still young. I am in a different status the next couple of weeks and have limited computer access this, so moderation will continue, but I am not going to be able to comment much back and forth. It is truly wonderful to be missed gang! I will back to address comments and follow up hopefully by the middle of next week.

West
TSA Blog Team

October 28, 2014 at 4:31 PM
................
So have you been reassigned to use pseudoscience BDO hokum at some federal building?

Nothing like unwarranted spying on the American public.

If I'm guessing correctly then more proof that TSA is overstaffed.

Anonymous said...

5doogs said...
I find it totaly irresponsible & unthinkable for any one to forget they are carrying a hand gun befor entering a airport & attempting to board a airplane in this social environment! "oh, I forgot I was packing!" .... Just dose NOT cut it in today's world! If it's that casual, perhaps you have no business owning a gun in the first place... Who are these folks? Citizens must carry the responsibility if they want to carry the wepon, be it knife, gun, or anything they know will make a flight uncomfortable for the rest of the passengers & the law...

October 29, 2014 at 6:25 AM
..............................
And the United States Constitution declares that; "the right of the People to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed".

The right to keep (own) and the right to bear (to carry) shall not be infringed.

Why is TSA violating our Constitution and the civil rights of citizens?

Perry said...

A toy, inert, or replica weapon by its very nature cannot hurt anyone, especially if it's in checked luggage.

Stop stealing from the flying public, TSA.

And apparently the blotter team only consists of West. Bob and Lynn must be on permanent vacation.

Anonymous said...

I have been watching this report for over a year now and I am shaking my head in disbelief as to the number of guns - Loaded/Unloaded, knives and other items... The number gets bigger and bigger every week.

The number does not increase every week. It actually holds fairly constant--and it continues to be minuscule compared to traveler volume--which suggests that TSA is having little deterrent effect.

GSOLTSO said...

Anon sez - "To not list the canon's caliber is a missed opportunity."

Agreed, the only caliber-type statements I have seen describing it were - "really big", "holy cow lookit the size of that barrel!", or "Man I would hate to be on the business end of that one when it goes off!".

RB sez - "And you are now the only TSA employee moderating comments?"

No.

Anon sez - "I never said I missed you, West."

Oh come now, I wouldn't have been mentioned if someone didn't miss me at least a little bit.

Perry sez - "And apparently the blotter team only consists of West. Bob and Lynn must be on permanent vacation."

Not really, we all have other responsibilities that we have to take care of. I am simply the one that does the most commentary right now, Bob does the majority of the posts and tons behind the scenes, and Lynn does tons of work behind the scenes. Soooo, they are still around, just more involved in other aspects.

Anon sez - "The number does not increase every week. It actually holds fairly constant--and it continues to be minuscule compared to traveler volume--which suggests that TSA is having little deterrent effect."

To be perfectly honest, you are correct, the numbers do not increase every week, but they have been trending higher that last couple of years consistently. I can tell you that it has had a deterrent effect on many of the folks that have had firearms with them in the checkpoint. I have not seen much in the form of recurrent discoveries among those that make the list.

West
TSA Blog Team

Anonymous said...

"I thought your cut and paste question was adressed last week."

Actually, no one's addressed that question in any way, shape, or form. Curtis Burns, West Cooper, and the other TSA bloggers are for some reason afraid to answer, or even acknowledge the existence of, these perfectly legitimate questions about TSA's use of slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners. It's almost like they're afraid to talk about it. Why do YOU think Curtis Burns and West Cooper are afraid to talk about TSA's use of slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners and the needless physical searches their use leads to?

Anonymous said...

"Yes, the TSA found some prohibited items. That is the most basic of their claimed functions so why do they try and claim so much success from the most basic part of their job?"

Wow, really? How about because they prevented 50 or so possible terrorist from taken a deady weapon onto a plane.
Lets assume they take guns a week. Thats about 2600 guns a year. What if just one of thos epeople had ill intent and TSA stopped them. Can anyone prove that it hasnt happened? Of course not. But TSA can prove that not terrorist has attempted to take down an American based flight as someone has already pointed out.
Is teh public really this nieve? Have we really forgotten or ignored the fact that there are people out there who wish to do harm to Americans?

SSSS for Some Reason said...

"... Anonymous said...
"And since none of the items were actually a threat to commercial aviation you shouldn't try and sound so proud of what you've done."

How do you know this?"

How do I know this? What a silly question. I keep up with current media, that is how I know.

No? OK.... how about this:

The only published results of the security tests performed by the TSA, well the only publicly published results, indicate roughly a 70% failure rate of screening at security checkpoints. That result was published a bunch of years ago and the lack of more recent announcements means it hasn't improved very much. Anyway.....

51 firearms found last week. That would mean, statistically speaking, a bit more than 200 firearms were *not* found. Since you can't prove a negative it could be much higher, or much lower, and neither matters because the only data point that does matter is there were no terrorist attacks of any kind on commercial aviation last week.

Still not buying it? OK, lets take a look at what was reported then.

A Cannon. In checked baggage.

It was found in checked baggage so a passenger couldn't use it against the aircraft. It didn't have any cannonballs in, near, or around it, so no explosive issues. And it didn't have a cartoon like fuse hissing slowly down portending a loud kaboom. Thus... not a threat to commercial aviation in any way.

The knives in the ankle of the boots.

While I certainly don't want to be the one stabbed, nor would I want anyone else stabbed either, a six inch blade is not a threat to commercial aviation. Vandalism would be the greatest fear, getting stabbed would really suck, but no threat to aviation from even two knives.

The Pot.

Federally controlled substance that is absolutely zero threat to plane or passengers.

Random collection of knives.

See above. Would suck to be the one stabbed, but knives are not a threat to aviation at any level. Even less so when consider it is perectly ok for someone carry aboard knitting needles that are twice as long or more than any of the knives advertised as finds.

Random bits of ammunition.

Without a firearm bullets are little more than fireworks that would go bang. You might could injure someone, maybe put an eye out or something, but not a threat to aviation.

And again I have to point out that all the things found represent less than one percent of one percent of the total number of travelers screened last week. If you want to see the stuff found and think that the skies are about to fall that is your opinion.

And if that is the opinion you choose just understand it will be based on feelings and have no connection to reality.

Anonymous said...

"And since none of the items were actually a threat to commercial aviation you shouldn't try and sound so proud of what you've done."

How do you know this?


There were no media reports about TSA stopping a would-be terrorist by discovering said terrorist's weapon or explosive at the checkpoint. You know it would be all over the news if TSA had foiled a terror plot.

Its not always about "finding" something as much as it is about preventing the attempt.

Do you have proof that TSA procedures are responsible for deterring attempts to enact terror plots? What if the deterrent is the combination of locked cockpit doors and knowing that passengers will fight back (as they did in the case of the Underwear Bomber and Shoe Bomber)?

Don't Tweet for Me said...

What "tons" is there for Bob and Lynn to do? They rarely post on Twitter, except retweeting other TSA accounts, which can and probably is automated. They very, very rarely answer questions on Twitter, so why bother reading question Tweets.

Posting pictures on Instagram takes seconds and is probably automated too.

Updating a couple of rows and taking a screenshot (so lame, just build an HTML table) of the chart above takes only a few minutes. No real blotter writing, just changing a number or two.

So, what tons of stuff, West, that it takes two full time employees besides your part-time self?

That certainly can't be the fake "security level," SSI.

Anonymous said...

People have been commenting that the TSA sees something vaguely weapon-like on the xray, checks it out, sees it clearly is not a weapon, but decides to steal, er, seize it because it would cause panic on a plane?

Here's the latest case of stupidity: http://reason.com/blog/2014/10/29/tsa-confiscares-raygun-belt-buckle-becau

A belt buckle. A BELT BUCKLE shaped like a 1950s ray gun. And the screener seized it.

Will this be in next week's"good catch" blotter? Was the screener following policy or abusing authority? If she was rogue, will he get it back? Will the TSA apologize?

Wintermute said...

Anonymous said...
"And since none of the items were actually a threat to commercial aviation you shouldn't try and sound so proud of what you've done."

How do you know this?


Because, by the TSAs own numbers, and confirmed by GAO reports, they miss ~70% of threat items. Yet planes are not falling out of the sky. Ergo, none of the items were actually a threat to commercial aviation.

Anonymous said...

You're not the least bit funny, West, just quite full of yourself.

Anonymous said...

What happened with the cannon?

Confiscated or allowed to travel?

Wintermute said...

TSAnonymous said...

"Wow, really? How about because they prevented 50 or so possible terrorist from taken a deady weapon onto a plane.
Lets assume they take guns a week."

Which, by their own numbers, means they let 150-200 possible terrorists with guns on US-originating flights. Yet not a single attempt on any of those flights. Or do you deny that they miss ~70% of threat items?

TSORon said...

RB said…
[[So by admission of a TSA employee TSA isn't looking strictly for WEI.]]

RB, you know as well as I do that the WEI you speak of can come in any shape, form, composition, or size. These things are limited only by the designers imagination and ingenuity.

Anonymous said...

Anon asked…
The right to keep (own) and the right to bear (to carry) shall not be infringed.

Why is TSA violating our Constitution and the civil rights of citizens?

Since before this country began there were limitations on where one could bring their firearms. 200+ years and this has not changed, nor I suspect will it. I suspect a broader look at the subject would be very beneficial for you.

Anonymous said...

"Why do YOU think Curtis Burns and West Cooper are afraid to talk about TSA's use of slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners and the needless physical searches their use leads to?"

Because it is a silly question and the asnwer is so obvious its a waste of their time?

Anonymous said...

"And since none of the items were actually a threat to commercial aviation you shouldn't try and sound so proud of what you've done."

How do you know this?

There were no media reports about TSA stopping a would-be terrorist by discovering said terrorist's weapon or explosive at the checkpoint. You know it would be all over the news if TSA had foiled a terror plot.

If TSA would have stopped the 9-11terrorist, the media would not have known. Yet the largest terror attack in our nations history would have been prevented. Your logic does not work here.

Anonymous said...

Do you have proof that TSA procedures are responsible for deterring attempts to enact terror plots? What if the deterrent is the combination of locked cockpit doors and knowing that passengers will fight back (as they did in the case of the Underwear Bomber and Shoe Bomber)?

Well, using thi slogic we should unlock the cabin doors. There is no reports of any terrorist attempting to gain access through them...

Anonymous said...

"Or do you deny that they miss ~70% of threat items?"

Yes, I do. The 70% is based on internal testing. Tests that are designed to fail. You dont learn about weaknesses from passed tests. Logic would dictate that you do not create a test with the idea of insuring the officers pass. The purpose of the test are to exploit weaknesses and then develope ways of strengthing those weaknesses. Does TSA fail 70% of thier internal tests? Probably. Am I concerned about it? Not at all. I would call their testing a complete waste of time and money if they passed 70% of the time.
This is logic 101. You dont strengthen your weaknesses without testing them and putting them under a stress test.

RB said...

TSORon said...
RB said…
[[So by admission of a TSA employee TSA isn't looking strictly for WEI.]]

RB, you know as well as I do that the WEI you speak of can come in any shape, form, composition, or size. These things are limited only by the designers imagination and ingenuity.

October 31, 2014 at 12:22 AM
................................
I don't recall questioning what form WEI may take.

Are you, as a TSA employee, claiming that TSA is authorized to search for things that are not suspected WEI, such as drugs, money, and such?

RB said...

Anonymous said...
Anon asked…
The right to keep (own) and the right to bear (to carry) shall not be infringed.

Why is TSA violating our Constitution and the civil rights of citizens?

Since before this country began there were limitations on where one could bring their firearms. 200+ years and this has not changed, nor I suspect will it. I suspect a broader look at the subject would be very beneficial for you.

October 31, 2014 at 12:27 AM
................
What other rights are willing to forfeit?

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
Anon asked…
The right to keep (own) and the right to bear (to carry) shall not be infringed.

Why is TSA violating our Constitution and the civil rights of citizens?

Since before this country began there were limitations on where one could bring their firearms. 200+ years and this has not changed, nor I suspect will it. I suspect a broader look at the subject would be very beneficial for you.
~~~~~~~~~~~~

And since this country was founded we have had a prohibition on the government restricting the freedoms of its citizens in regards to arms.

Read that sentence again and do so very carefully.

It is perfectly acceptable for Delta to tell us no firearms.

It is completely unacceptable for the TSA, a branch of the government, to tell us no firearms.

See the difference?

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
some suggestions for TSA to make our travel and security experience as convenient as possible:

1) eliminate TSA and return to pre-911 screening. the TSA makes things no more secure, and arguably less secure, since the last red team results made available to the public indicate that TSA is allowing 70% of prohibited items through, as opposed to 60% or lower in testing of the old systems. in addition, the 911 attacks focused on 2 gaps in security: unsecured cockpit doors, and the training of flight crews and passengers to be compliant. both of those are now corrected - no one is going to take over an airliner with a penknife.

i believe that tsa attempted to go back to a pre 9/11 screening model by allowing small knives to be allowed on planes. however many organizations rebuffed it and said that it should not go through and it was stopped.
"2) full and total transparency of all DHS and TSA regulations, rules, procedures, and watch/no-fly lists, as well as public comment periods for new rules, and an independent appeal process for those placed on no fly or terrorist watch lists (as ordered by the federal courts).

no arguement there.

"3) eliminate the Pre-Bribe, er, Pre-Check program. it is a waste of taxpayer dollars as well as flat out insulting to be required to pay to have a background check done in order to be screened in a semi-sane way, when I hold a security clearance and a concealed wepaons permit, both of which require a more thorough background check than TSA is likely to do."

to my knowledge tsa is attempting to go back to a pre 9/11 model for passengers with pre-check or "pre-bribe" as you call it. and yet you want it to go away so which is it?

"4) eliminate ID requirements. it is unConstitutional (freedom to travel domestically is not guaranteed only if the govt can ID you), and it contributes nothing to security. what does it matter if you know my name, if I am carrying a bomb? why is my name any damn business of yours if I am not carrying a bomb or
intending some kind of threat?"

tsa was just blasted for allowing illegal immigrants to boards planes with out positive id and yet you dont think that anyone should need to show an id. how can tsa win when they are being pulled from both sides?

Anonymous said...

"I suspect a broader look at the subject would be very beneficial for you."

I would suspect the same is true for most if not all of the cridics here. These are all common sense questions they ask.

Anonymous said...

wait for it...
here somes the spelling police...

Anonymous said...

TSORon, are you saying that the TSA is concerned that they are concerned that someone will make a bomb out of hash?

SSSS for Some Reason said...

The cannon.... seriously, we want to know.... did it fly or not?

Susan Richart said...

Anonymous wrote:

"Yes, I do [deny TSA misses 70& of contraband]. The 70% is based on internal testing.

To repeat what RB wrote about 6 weeks ago:

"As evidence of the toll this is taking, Kasprisin cited the results of agency tests in which undercover operatives try to sneak weapons or explosives through airport security. He said security employees are increasingly missing the contraband, with the frequency of failures reaching a “frightening” level."

That's from WaPo - go look it up.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Susan Richart said...

Our anonymous friend wrote:

"tsa was just blasted for allowing illegal immigrants to boards planes with out positive id and yet you dont think that anyone should need to show an id."

Can you please tell us, using your critical thinking skills, exactly how showing ID makes air traveler any safer.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Oscar said...

but there were all the cannon parts???, it coulded be use it?? and It must be interesting to hear the explanations of the people that travel with those weapons!!

RB said...

Anonymous said..."Or do you deny that they miss ~70% of threat items?"
^^^^^^^
Yes, I do. The 70% is based on internal testing. Tests that are designed to fail. You dont learn about weaknesses from passed tests. Logic would dictate that you do not create a test with the idea of insuring the officers pass. The purpose of the test are to exploit weaknesses and then develope ways of strengthing those weaknesses. Does TSA fail 70% of thier internal tests? Probably. Am I concerned about it? Not at all. I would call their testing a complete waste of time and money if they passed 70% of the time. This is logic 101. You dont strengthen your weaknesses without testing them and putting them under a stress test.October 31, 2014 at 9:02 AM
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
A TSA employee testing screening effectiveness was able to carry a handgun through MMW Whole Body Imagers. At least 5 attempts were completed, all successful.

That certainly doesn't sound like a test intended to fail.

Anonymous said...

"If TSA would have stopped the 9-11terrorist, the media would not have known.... Your logic does not work here."

My logic doesn't work? TSA did not exist pre-9/11, you know.

"...What if the deterrent is the combination of locked cockpit doors and knowing that passengers will fight back...?"

Well, using thi slogic we should unlock the cabin doors. There is no reports of any terrorist attempting to gain access through them...


...and the point goes right over your head. I asked for proof that TSA procedures work. I identified non-TSA changes to air travel to demonstrate that any deterrent effect claimed by TSA could very well be the result of non-TSA factors, since TSA has not bothered to provide any proof to support its procedures.

Anonymous said...

"...You dont strengthen your weaknesses without testing them and putting them under a stress test."

Maybe TSA should've tested the naked body scanners before they spent taxpayer funds on hundreds of them. Asking for public comment before the purchase might have provided useful information as well.

RB said...

Anonymous said...
"...You dont strengthen your weaknesses without testing them and putting them under a stress test."

Maybe TSA should've tested the naked body scanners before they spent taxpayer funds on hundreds of them. Asking for public comment before the purchase might have provided useful information as well.

November 4, 2014 at 2:03 PM
......................
Not only did TSA not comply with the Administrative Procedure Act before deploying Whole Body Strip Search Machines but even after a court ordered TSA to comply TSA stalled for another two years before being ordered once again to comply with the act. Now after a period of public comment TSA has failed to publish a final rule and the comment period closed going on two years ago.

Why is it that TSA seems to think the law doesn't apply to TSA operations?

Anonymous said...

"3) eliminate the Pre-Bribe, er, Pre-Check program. it is a waste of taxpayer dollars as well as flat out insulting to be required to pay to have a background check done in order to be screened in a semi-sane way, when I hold a security clearance and a concealed wepaons permit, both of which require a more thorough background check than TSA is likely to do."

to my knowledge tsa is attempting to go back to a pre 9/11 model for passengers with pre-check or "pre-bribe" as you call it. and yet you want it to go away so which is it?
---------------------------------
pre-91 security would not charge $85 for the "privelege" of screening without the extra harrassment.

pre-911 security would use WTMD and HHMD, rather than intrusive pat-downs and scanners which still do not meet the privacy requirements Congress insisted on. and which don't appear to find anything that the MD wouldn't.

pre-911 security would not claim that liquids are dangerous, but just dispose of them in open waste bins right in the middle of screening.

pre-911 security was not based on secret "risk-based" policies which do not appear to have any credible link to risk.

pre-911 security was not an impenetrable, non-transparent set of policies that the TSA will not even confirm or deny are policies.

pre-911 security does not even vaguely resemble the direction that TSA has already gone or is taking in the future. if they went back to that, we'd at least be one step closer to sanity. pre-Check is not that step.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
"3) eliminate the Pre-Bribe, er, Pre-Check program. it is a waste of taxpayer dollars as well as flat out insulting to be required to pay to have a background check done in order to be screened in a semi-sane way, when I hold a security clearance and a concealed wepaons permit, both of which require a more thorough background check than TSA is likely to do."

to my knowledge tsa is attempting to go back to a pre 9/11 model for passengers with pre-check or "pre-bribe" as you call it. and yet you want it to go away so which is it?
---------------------------------
pre-91 security would not charge $85 for the "privelege" of screening without the extra harrassment.

pre-911 security would use WTMD and HHMD, rather than intrusive pat-downs and scanners which still do not meet the privacy requirements Congress insisted on. and which don't appear to find anything that the MD wouldn't.

pre-911 security would not claim that liquids are dangerous, but just dispose of them in open waste bins right in the middle of screening.

pre-911 security was not based on secret "risk-based" policies which do not appear to have any credible link to risk.

pre-911 security was not an impenetrable, non-transparent set of policies that the TSA will not even confirm or deny are policies.

pre-911 security does not even vaguely resemble the direction that TSA has already gone or is taking in the future. if they went back to that, we'd at least be one step closer to sanity. pre-Check is not that step.

November 10, 2014 at 8:44 AM

yes pre911 security was run by private companies that were contracted by the airlines. they basically put their financial bottom line ahead of your life. they used the same equipment for years on end and did not change policies so that loopholes could be idenified and used to plan the 9/11 attacks. you can say what you want about the tsa but they upgraded the machines used in screening significantly in order to upgrade what the pre911 companies used. they have attempted to bring forward new machines to stop other issues that arise. just like the pre911 companies did not think that a box cutter could be used to take down a plane they did not think that explosives could be placed on a person and brought onto a plane. pre911 security did not stop numerous pre911 terrorist attacks. pre911 security did not check peoples checked luggage. so as you can see there has been a benefit to post 911 screening.

Anonymous said...

Yo, TSAnonymous!

Sentences.have a noun, a verb, an object, and often adjectives and adverbs.

You know what else they have? Periods!

You know what planes have? Locked cockpit doors. You know what flight crews and passengers won't do? Comply with a hijacker.

You know what TSA is? Security theater.

Also, there were no pre-911 terrorist attacks in the US involving taking over a plane, especially to fly into buildings. Read some history.

Anonymous said...

 Anonymous said...Anonymous said... "3) eliminate the Pre-Bribe, er, Pre-Check program. it is a waste of taxpayer dollars as well as flat out insulting to be required to pay to have a background check done in order to be screened in a semi-sane way, when I hold a security clearance and a concealed wepaons permit, both of which require a more thorough background check than TSA is likely to do."to my knowledge tsa is attempting to go back to a pre 9/11 model for passengers with pre-check or "pre-bribe" as you call it. and yet you want it to go away so which is it?---------------------------------pre-91 security would not charge $85 for the "privelege" of screening without the extra harrassment.pre-911 security would use WTMD and HHMD, rather than intrusive pat-downs and scanners which still do not meet the privacy requirements Congress insisted on. and which don't appear to find anything that the MD wouldn't.pre-911 security would not claim that liquids are dangerous, but just dispose of them in open waste bins right in the middle of screening.pre-911 security was not based on secret "risk-based" policies which do not appear to have any credible link to risk.pre-911 security was not an impenetrable, non-transparent set of policies that the TSA will not even confirm or deny are policies.pre-911 security does not even vaguely resemble the direction that TSA has already gone or is taking in the future. if they went back to that, we'd at least be one step closer to sanity. pre-Check is not that step.November 10, 2014 at 8:44 AMyes pre911 security was run by private companies that were contracted by the airlines. they basically put their financial bottom line ahead of your life. they used the same equipment for years on end and did not change policies so that loopholes could be idenified and used to plan the 9/11 attacks. you can say what you want about the tsa but they upgraded the machines used in screening significantly in order to upgrade what the pre911 companies used. they have attempted to bring forward new machines to stop other issues that arise. just like the pre911 companies did not think that a box cutter could be used to take down a plane they did not think that explosives could be placed on a person and brought onto a plane. pre911 security did not stop numerous pre911 terrorist attacks. pre911 security did not check peoples checked luggage. so as you can see there has been a benefit to post 911 screening.November 16, 2014 at 9:44 AM

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The FAA set screening standards prior to TSA. So 9/11 was a failure of government. Guess what TSA is? That's right, a government agency. Name one thing government does well other than wasting money.