Friday, September 26, 2014

TSA Week in Review - 48 Firearms Discovered This Week in Carry-On Bags (40 Were Loaded)

Loaded firearm discovered at SAT
48 Firearms Discovered This Week – Of the 48 firearms, 40 were loaded and 11 had rounds chambered. (Edited 1-1-2015)

Artfully Concealed Prohibited Items – It’s important to examine your bags prior to traveling to ensure you are not carrying prohibited items. If a prohibited item is discovered in your bag or on your body, you could be cited and possibly arrested by local law enforcement. Here are a few examples from this week where prohibited items were found by our officers in strange places. 
  • When TSA officers at John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK) opened a checked bag for a routine inspection, they discovered many household items, like baby wipes, coffee, lemonade mix, and a box of cat litter. After a closer look, they found two disassembled .40 caliber handguns, 350 rounds of ammunition, and 58 bricks of marijuana (33 pounds) concealed in the products. The traveler was arrested on state charges by the Port Authority Police.
  • A cane sword was discovered at New York Kennedy (JFK).
Firearms, Ammunition, and 33 Pounds of Marijuana (JFK)
Miscellaneous Prohibited Items In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons and many other prohibited items too numerous to note.

Stun Guns – 13 stun guns were discovered this week in carry-on bags. Two were discovered at Denver (DEN), and the remainder were found at Buffalo (BUF), Dallas Love (DAL), Gainesville (GNV), Knoxville (TYS), Las Vegas (LAS), Lewiston (LWS), Lubbock (LBB), Minneapolis (MSP), Oklahoma City (OKC), Raleigh-Durham (RDU), and Syracuse (SYR).

(Edited 1-1-2015) *In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates.

You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms. Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $7,500. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions, that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

If you haven’t seen it yet, make sure you check out our TSA Blog Year in Review for 2013. You can also check out 2011 & 2012 as well.

Follow @TSABlogTeam on Twitter and Instagram!


If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact us by clicking here.

70 comments:

SSSS for Some Reason said...

Why are weapons in checked bags on your list of prohibited items?

The pot.... well that is illegal in most of the country, definitely illegal in New York, so that makes sense to call the Police.

But the gun and ammunition? A disassembled gun no less? It is only in the movies that someone can get from the cabin down to the luggage compartment to get their gun out of their checked bags.

CliffG said...

"two disassembled .40 caliber handguns, 350 rounds of ammunition, and 58 bricks of marijuana (33 pounds) concealed in the products." I guess he just forgot to inspect his suitcase.

DK Ang said...

I am happy to add that TSA has also made the skies safe from my dental floss.

Earl Munroe said...

Keep on doing a good job

RB said...

What training and qualifications do TSA screeners posses that enable them to identify drugs such as marijuanna?

RB said...

"The Government Accountability Office (GAO) has put out a new report intended toanalyze the performance of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) in the operation of the watchlists that determine how much abuse passengers have to suffer before being allowed on a plane (assuming they're allowed)."

http://reason.com/blog/2014/09/23/aclu-tsa-now-using-hypothetical-threats

----------------------------

I'm really curious exactly where TSA derives any authority to place anyone on any kind of a risk list.

When did TSA comply with standing law and the ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES ACT before secretly implementing programs that adversely impact citizens?

Why is TSA plotting against the freedom of citizens?

I don't know what side you think TSA is on but I know it's not the side of freedom!

RB said...

http://news.yahoo.com/justice-department-tells-ferguson-police-stop-wearing-bracelets-004135604.html

"The DOJ said it had been assured by officials with the county and state police, which have been brought in to help in Ferguson, that their officers would not wear them. Ferguson police could not be reached for comment on Friday evening.In a separate letter sent to Jackson earlier this week, the Justice Department said its investigators had observed Ferguson police officers not wearing, or obscuring, their name tags on their uniforms, a violation of the police department's rules."The failure to wear name plates conveys a message to community members that, through anonymity, officers may seek to act with impunity," the letter said."

So the United States Justice Department believes thst obscuring or not properly wearing name plates conveys a message to the public that employees may seek to act with impunity.

Would the blog team care to answer why TSA employees do this exact thing?

Indian's Paint Brush said...

Once again, nothing that would not have been found using baggage xray and walk through metal detectors. The continued use of the naked pic scanners is a violation of the public's privacy and our bodies. The scanners' fail rate of over 50% means more passengers are groped, often on their breasts, buttocks, and genitals, which is sexual assault by a government actor.

Just like a three-striper screener said to me, screeners aren't allowed to use common sense. This is due to the invasive and ridiculous TSA rules.

@SkyWayManAz said...

RB said...
"Would the blog team care to answer why TSA employees do this exact thing?"

Wasn't there a previous post a year or two back that basically told us TSA doesn't have to tell us their name? Any time any of us deal with a law enforcement officer we have the right to request their name and badge number. TSA seemed to be saying in that previous post they do not need to comply with that standard. That is precisely why I recently defended the right of the passenger in Denver exiting his flight to leave the airport without submitting to further screening. TSA doesn't have to prove to us who they are. That wasn't at a checkpoint where we'd at least hope the employees there really are who they claim to be.

Sandra said...

SkyWayMan@AZ wrote "Wasn't there a previous post a year or two back that basically told us TSA doesn't have to tell us their name? Any time any of us deal with a law enforcement officer we have the right to request their name and badge number"

Perhaps it is time that DHS equip all of its screeners with wearable cameras that record each and every single encounter with the traveling public.

RB said...

 @SkyWayManAz said...RB said..."Would the blog team care to answer why TSA employees do this exact thing?"

Wasn't there a previous post a year or two back that basically told us TSA doesn't have to tell us their name? Any time any of us deal with a law enforcement officer we have the right to request their name and badge number. TSA seemed to be saying in that previous post they do not need to comply with that standard. That is precisely why I recently defended the right of the passenger in Denver exiting his flight to leave the airport without submitting to further screening. TSA doesn't have to prove to us who they are. That wasn't at a checkpoint where we'd at least hope the employees there really are who they claim to be.
September 28, 2014 at 9:28 AM
******************************
I do believe there was.

Why would a TSA employee do things to hide their identity?

Would it be because they know what they are doing is wrong?

Or could it perhaps be TSA employees engaged in illegal acts?

As Justice indicated the likely reason is TSA employees are trying to act with impunity.


Anonymous said...

Thank you TSA for finding weapons. We live in a scary time and who knows what these people would have done on the plane if these weapons passed through. I only wish there was an exorbitant fine for attempting to pass with weapons that would discourage people instead of a slap on the wrist.

RB said...

Summary: The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) intends to issue a final rule to address whether screening and inspection of an individual, conducted to control access to the sterile area of an airport or to an aircraft, may include the use of advanced imaging technology (AIT). The NPRM was published on March 26, 2012, to comply with the decision rendered by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit in Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) v. U.S. Department of Homeland Security on July 15, 2011. 653 F.3d 1 (D.C. Cir. 2011). The Court directed TSA to conduct notice and comment rulemaking on the use of AIT in the primary screening of passengers.

So after a long court battle that TSA lost and more foot dragging by TSA a NPRM was published in March of 2012.

Over 5,544 comments were submitted with the vast majority being in opposition of TSA's use of ELECTRONIC STRIP SEARCH MACHINES.

It is now the end of September, 2014 and TSA has yet to release the final rule.

Why is it that TSA had to be sued in federal court and forced to obey the laws of the United States?

Does TSA believe the agency to be exempt from the law?

When will the final results of the Strip Search Machine NPRM be released?

Anonymous said...

I have no idea why I find this stuff so fascinating, but I do. Perhaps it's because I travel regularly, and I find it hard tor believe what people actually either "forget" they have about their person (how does one own a cane sword and NOT know it? And for that matter, how can there be so MANY cane swords that need to be transported by air?) I guess I have also not figured out how so many guns cal all be loaded (some with rounds chambered) and their owner not know it, as they prep for travel? Even the most hardened liberal cannot believe that that many gun owners are that oblivious to the basics of gun useage. This blog is not a convincer, however. It just seems to attract cheerleaders and takers of pot shots (both puns intended, thank you), not to mention the morbidly interested such as yours truly. But keep the photos and seized lists coming. It makes for a fun read, or would, if I didn't think about what this mean....

Anonymous said...

Earl Munroe said...
Keep on doing a good job

September 27, 2014 at 1:23 PM
--------------------------------
when are they going to start doing a good job?? right now they are abusing civil rights, playing at unwarranted secrecy, and wasting billions of dollars.

Anonymous said...

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense.

Anonymous said...

Another week, another complete lack of anything found with your slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners. Meanwhile, how many people had to undergo physical searches because of false alarms from the naked body scanners? And why are Curtis Burns and West Cooper afraid to acknowledge, let alone answer, that question?

Perhaps they could answer this one, instead: How many weeks has it been since you announced ANY item found with naked body scanners? And would that item have also been found with a walk-through metal detector?

RB said...

Anonymous said...
Thank you TSA for finding weapons. We live in a scary time and who knows what these people would have done on the plane if these weapons passed through. I only wish there was an exorbitant fine for attempting to pass with weapons that would discourage people instead of a slap on the wrist.

September 28, 2014 at 10:19 PM
............................
Does it concern you that TSA screeners miss 70% or so of target items?

I the 70% figure is even remotely accurate and nothing bad is happening then why the concern?

Shouldn't you be more concerned that even with an $8 Billion Dollar annual budget that TSA screeners can't even do the most basic part of their jobs correctly and seem to be focused on things which are not part of the law authorizing TSA?

The public needs to face facts, TSA is overall a complete failure.

Anonymous said...

RB you really do need to find a day job, and possibly a much better use of your time.

RB said...

Anonymous Anonymous said...
RB you really do need to find a day job, and possibly a much better use of your time.

September 29, 2014 at 9:37 AM

...........................
I have a day job. I also find the time to monitor TSA for its continued violations of the public's trust.

Why the concern about how I spend my time Anon? Truth hitting to close to home?

Anonymous said...

"The continued use of the naked pic scanners is a violation of the public's privacy and our bodies."

Again, the complete ignorance of those who post here and think they have all the answers. TSA has not used "naked scanners" in 2 years. They have been removed from ALL AMERICAN AIRPORTS.
Perhaps when you catch up on technology being used, your complaints will be a little more valid.

1st Sgt USMC (ret) said...

If you who are negative about the TSA AGENTS, take a train or Greyhound and see how far you get vs. Flying in the same amount of time .The day you are going to fly, before leaving for the airport, look in the mirror, count to ten, smile and say to yourself, "I love America and I love TSA AGENTS, who have kept me alive on every flight I have been on!" Now keep that same attitude when you get to the airport. If you have a negative attitude the TSA AGENTS are trained to pick you out, and that is your fault not their's.

RB said...

1st Sgt USMC (ret) said...
If you who are negative about the TSA AGENTS, take a train or Greyhound and see how far you get vs. Flying in the same amount of time .The day you are going to fly, before leaving for the airport, look in the mirror, count to ten, smile and say to yourself, "I love America and I love TSA AGENTS, who have kept me alive on every flight I have been on!" Now keep that same attitude when you get to the airport. If you have a negative attitude the TSA AGENTS are trained to pick you out, and that is your fault not their's.

September 29, 2014 at 12:13 PM
......................
So how long have you worked at TSA?

Traveling, but foot, car, bus, train or air is a right that has been acknowledged by the courts.

There is no evidence that TSA has kept anyone safe and there is no requirement to respect or even like TSA clerks.

TSA clerks can no better identify a person a person with a negative attitude than anyone else just guessing. Even if the BDO claims had any basis in science, which it does not, wouldn't the person have to be trying to conceal something?

TSA will gain respect when they start earning respect.

That hasn't happened yet.

Susan Richart said...

"Again, the complete ignorance of those who post here and think they have all the answers. TSA has not used "naked scanners" in 2 years. They have been removed from ALL AMERICAN AIRPORTS.

Perhaps when you catch up on technology being used, your complaints will be a little more valid."

Not ignorance, fact. The scanners in use today are the same ones that were in use 2 years ago with the addition of software that "translates" the naked picture to either a male or female icon with the area of the "anomoly" circled. About 50% of the time, if not more, that "anomoly" is false.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Susan Richart said...

"1st Sgt USMC (ret) said...

If you who are negative about the TSA AGENTS, take a train or Greyhound and see how far you get vs. Flying in the same amount of time .The day you are going to fly, before leaving for the airport, look in the mirror, count to ten, smile and say to yourself, "I love America and I love TSA AGENTS, who have kept me alive on every flight I have been on!" Now keep that same attitude when you get to the airport. If you have a negative attitude the TSA AGENTS are trained to pick you out, and that is your fault not their's."

And how much Kool-Aid did you drink before writing this?

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Susan Richart said...

"Anonymous said...

RB you really do need to find a day job, and possibly a much better use of your time.

September 29, 2014 at 9:37 AM"

For my money, RB's time is time well spent.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Anonymous said...

@ TSAnonymous who incorrectly stars that the TSA removed scanners that take and store naked images of the traveling public:

The TSA removed the X-RAY scanners, but did not remove the MILLIMETER WAVE scanners.

Both types of scanners take and store (at TSA request) very revealing images of people, to the point the person's genitals and contours can be seen on the stored image.

Please get your bosses to tell you the truth, TSAnonymous.

Wintermute said...

Anonymous said...
"The continued use of the naked pic scanners is a violation of the public's privacy and our bodies."

Again, the complete ignorance of those who post here and think they have all the answers. TSA has not used "naked scanners" in 2 years. They have been removed from ALL AMERICAN AIRPORTS.


When you point your finger at someone, the other four are pointing back at yourself. In other words, yes, your ignorance IS showing. As has been pointed out repeatedly, if you'd bother to look, just because there's a gumby image on the display doesn't mean it doesn't do the naked pic thing behind the scenes. Also, the original RFPs require them to be able to store and the transmit underlying image.

Perhaps when you catch up on technology being used, your complaints will be a little more valid.

Good suggestion. Might I ask that you do the same?

S. Wayne said...

Hey alleged retired marine, if a TSA SCREENER chooses to mistreat an unhappy passenger, he should be fired.

Anonymous said...

interesting read on the people scanners.
http://www.courthousenews.com/2014/09/24/71774.htm

Anonymous said...

"Not ignorance, fact. The scanners in use today are the same ones that were in use 2 years ago with the addition of software that "translates" the naked picture to either a male or female icon with the area of the "anomoly" circled. About 50% of the time, if not more, that "anomoly" is false."

False. There are NO images taken, NO images stored and no ability to take pictures.

"As has been pointed out repeatedly, if you'd bother to look, just because there's a gumby image on the display doesn't mean it doesn't do the naked pic thing behind the scenes. Also, the original RFPs require them to be able to store and the transmit underlying image."

False.

There are no pictures, no ability to take pictures..

Its millimeter waves.
Take off the tin foil hat...

RB said...

Anonymous said...
interesting read on the people scanners.
http://www.courthousenews.com/2014/09/24/71774.htm

September 30, 2014 at 6:50 AM

The Corbett ruling seems to be loaded with appealable decisions.

No where in the Fourth Amendment is there language allowing for Administrative searches.

Under current rulings an Administrative Search is a public search so when TSA insist on doing an Administrative Search in a hidden room it is no longer an Administrative Search.

Finally TSA is obligated to use the least invasive search means available and rubbing TSA hands on a persons junk is certainly no the least invasive means available.

The so-called TSA Administrative Search fails on every level.

@SkyWayManAz said...

1st Sgt USMC (ret) I agree with you that if you approach the podium with a chip on your shoulder you're going to have a bad experience no matter how polite the TSA screener is. I always try to be polite and cooperative with TSA. Unfortunately some in TSA have a very different idea of what those concepts are than most people. Honestly I wanted to be a TSA cheerleader. I really really did. I did their job as a kid one summer fresh out of high school during the 80's and knew long before 9/11 what a joke most of the screeners were. TSA embraced those qualities early on while adding a Cartmanesque attitude toward dealing with the public. I laughed myself silly watching Cindy on Orange is the New Black in her previous life working for TSA. As a private screener she would have been fired immediately for her antics. Her openly stealing from airport concessions may be a bit over the top even for TSA but would they complain if they feared retaliation from her coworkers in real life? Her performance in stealing from passengers with coworker assistance is unfortunately very real and very well documented.

Anonymous said...

"...I guess I have also not figured out how so many guns cal all be loaded (some with rounds chambered) and their owner not know it, as they prep for travel? Even the most hardened liberal cannot believe that that many gun owners are that oblivious to the basics of gun useage."

It's a matter of statistics. If you compare the number of people found to be carrying guns* to the number of flyers going through TSA checkpoints, you will see how very, very, very small the number of gun-toting flyers is. But more importantly, were any of these flyers arrested as terrorists? Lack of news reports and lack of TSA self congratulation would suggest none of them were arrested.

*The last published tests indicated that TSA misses 70% of prohibited items. You can find this statistic in numerous articles (e.g., http://abc13.com/archive/7848683/).

Anonymous said...

@1st Sgt USMC:

When you joined the Marine Corps, you took an oath to protect and defend the Constitution against all enemies, foreign or domestic.

Why do you support a domestic enemy of the Constitution?

SSSS for Some Reason said...

RB Said... "The so-called TSA Administrative Search fails on every level."

And if you remind the nice Agents of that fact then the nice Agents will ask you, in their most authoritative voice of course, if you want to fly today.

We really need the TSA to adopt the same model as the FAA. They can write the standards for security and let the airlines and airports do the actual securing following those standards.

The TSA can keep the spiffy uniforms and the guns they have purchased as well as the shiny tin badges.

It will be so much better than what we have now, so much more effective, so much more efficient. And, most importantly, it might actually have a chance of making the travelling public safer.

GSOLTSO said...

Sandra sez - "Perhaps it is time that DHS equip all of its screeners with wearable cameras that record each and every single encounter with the traveling public."

While I would volunteer to wear one at all times on duty, I do not think this is going to be something that shows up at checkpoints across the country any time soon. This can be a valuable tool in the process of addressing errors, and offering constructive commentary. They also cost moolah, and we are currently working to cut budget and realign our funding as we move forward - so this is probably not (nor will it soon be) on the agenda.

SSSS sez - "Why are weapons in checked bags on your list of prohibited items?"

Because there are currently regulations that pertain to certain items in the checked baggage areas (WEI, certain chemicals and substances, etc). These regulations have been fairly close to the same for a decade or more. These regulations have been enacted for the protection and safety of all folks on the plane and were motivated by possible safety issues identified by either the TSA, DHS, FAA, or possibly other federal safety groups.


DK Ang sez - "I am happy to add that TSA has also made the skies safe from my dental floss."

Dental floss is not a prohibited item, so it should have been allowed! I have never even heard of dental floss not being allowed to go before.

West
TSA Blog Team

Anonymous said...

"Under current rulings an Administrative Search is a public search so when TSA insist on doing an Administrative Search in a hidden room it is no longer an Administrative Search."

again, those who continually complain here have false information. TSA does not INSIST on anything.Everything is an option for the passeneger. You are told prior to screening that you are being screened and your person and property MAY get additional screening. It is your choice. TSA's only stipulation is, 100% of perple and property will be screened prior to entering the sterile area. Also, there are no hidden rooms. If you are referring to private screening, you can take a witness in with you.

@SkyWayManAz said...

Wes I'd be happy to donate some wearable cameras but assuming they weren't stolen I have a feeling your superiors would say it was a uniform violation. Are budgetary reasons also why your superiors opt out of providing you with dosimeter badges? Every other worker around radiation producing equipment is required to wear them. It is considered a uniform violation if you were to purchase one and wear it. I was required by federal law to wear one as a private screener but TSA seems less concerned with your health and safety.

SSSS for Some Reason said...

"...Everything is an option for the passeneger."

No, it isn't.

TSA exists between the ticketing counters and the jet-ways. I can't go to a different airlines or different terminal to bypass TSA. There isn't a special airline option that I could choose that doesn't have TSA.

And if the TSA has to screen 100% of the people entering the 'sterile area' of the airport, how is that in any way optional? 100% of something would make it mandatory, wouldn't it?

I also can't take greyhound because the TSA uses VIPER teams in many of the terminals. Greyhound also doesn't go to Hawaii. Or Europe. Or South America.

I also can't take the train because TSA uses VIPER teams to inspect people when they get off the trains at their destinations. And the trains also don't go to Hawaii, or Europe, or South America.

TSA is not an 'option.' The fact that they post signs doesn't mean it is my choice, the only way to get from the ticket counter to the airplane is through the TSA.

Like the nice Agents always ask me when I challenge them on anything... "Do you want to fly today?" They don't make it sound like there are other options available now do they?

Susan Richart said...

The Anonymous screener wrote:

"Also, there are no hidden rooms. If you are referring to private screening, you can take a witness in with you."

Taking a witness with you is NOT the same as asking that a resolution screening be done in full view of the public.

"Moreover, the possibility for abuse is minimized by the public nature of the search. Unlike searches conducted on dark and lonely streets at night where often the officer and the subject are the only witnesses, these searches are made under supervision and not far from the scrutiny of the traveling public."
See United States v. Skipwith, 482 F.2d 1272, 1275
(5th Cir. 1973)."

Do you know what the word "scrutiny" means?

It means close watch or critical observation.

So let's rewrite that sentence from Skipwith:

"...these searches are made under supervision and not far from the close watch or critical observation of the traveling public."

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Anonymous said...

"TSA's only stipulation is, 100% of perple and property will be screened prior to entering the sterile area."

Absolute malarkey. TSA's own employees are not screened, making them the best vector for getting weapons and explosives onto airplanes.

RB said...

Anonymous said...
"Under current rulings an Administrative Search is a public search so when TSA insist on doing an Administrative Search in a hidden room it is no longer an Administrative Search."

again, those who continually complain here have false information. TSA does not INSIST on anything.Everything is an option for the passeneger. You are told prior to screening that you are being screened and your person and property MAY get additional screening. It is your choice. TSA's only stipulation is, 100% of perple and property will be screened prior to entering the sterile area. Also, there are no hidden rooms. If you are referring to private screening, you can take a witness in with you.

October 1, 2014 at 9:55 AM

---------------------
Along with the rest of the misinformation you posted the highlighted sentence is so wrong that it is laughable .

When did TSA start screening 100% of the people and property entering the sterile area?

Does TSA screen 100% of the airport workers, airline employees, ramp workers or even TSA employees when they enter the sterile area?

If you answer yes that would be a bold faced lie!

RB said...

Dental floss is not a prohibited item, so it should have been allowed! I have never even heard of dental floss not being allowed to go before.

West
TSA Blog Team

October 1, 2014 at 5:36 AM
.............

Neither are cupcakes, purses, and other such items but that didn't stop TSA from confiscating these things.

Anonymous said...

"...TSA does not INSIST on anything.Everything is an option for the passeneger... Also, there are no hidden rooms. If you are referring to private screening, you can take a witness in with you."

Have you heard of coercion? Coerced testimony doesn't stand up in courts. Have you heard of extortion?

What is not optional at all is US citizens' RIGHT of travel through the navigable airspace. It is a RIGHT by law. TSA procedures that limit that right on no demonstrable basis are UNLAWFUL.

The private screening rooms are not hidden. What happens inside them is hidden--as well as inconsistent with the administrative search doctrine.

Anonymous said...

SSSS said: "TSA exists between the ticketing counters and the jet-ways. I can't go to a different airlines or different terminal to bypass TSA. There isn't a special airline option that I could choose that doesn't have TSA."

Netjets, it can be less money than commercial and no TSA and you can travel internationally.

GSOLTSO said...

SkyWayManAZ sez - "Wes I'd be happy to donate some wearable cameras but assuming they weren't stolen I have a feeling your superiors would say it was a uniform violation."

That is mighty nice of you to offer, but I am fairly certain that you are correct about the uniform violation ruling at this point.

RB sez - "Neither are cupcakes, purses, and other such items but that didn't stop TSA from confiscating these things."

I have nothing on the cupcake, the technical explanation was probably correct (as there was more than 3 oz of icing), but I have never held the item, and would have to physically see it on xray and in my hand in order to understand that situation better... Because icing falls under the LAG guidelines.

As for the purse, which one are you speaking about?

Lastly, TSA does not confiscate items, they are identified as prohibited items, the normal set of options to take the item back out, give to a family member/friend not flying, put back in the passengers automobile, place in checked baggage, dispose of in some other fashion outside of the screening area - or voluntarily abandon the item to TSA.

**There are some items that require the notification of local LEOs, if a prohibited item requires notification of a LEO, the disposition of the item is entirely up to the LEOs that respond, not TSA.

These options are supposed to be made available to all passengers, whether it is a hockey stick, or a container of LAG. As always, the passenger makes the final decision of what to do with the item (as long as it is not one of the prohibs that require LEO notification).

Anon sez - "Netjets, it can be less money than commercial and no TSA and you can travel internationally."

Those guys come through all the time, evidently they are doing a fair to middling business!

Ok gang, I will be gone for a short vacation, I will be back in a few days and try to catch up - later!

West
TSA Blog Team

Anonymous said...

"And do the male screeners ask the male passengers about "suspicious" bulges in the "resistance" area?"

Actually, on a random basis, they are screened, just like a passenger would be screened.TSA employees are not exempt.

Anonymous said...

"Does TSA screen 100% of the airport workers, airline employees, ramp workers or even TSA employees when they enter the sterile area?"

At some level, yes. Everyone is screened.

Anonymous said...

Yes, SSSS..it is 100% your choice. You can not go to those destinations OR you can fly privatly if you must go.

Your choice...

Anonymous said...

"What is not optional at all is US citizens' RIGHT of travel through the navigable airspace. It is a RIGHT by law. TSA procedures that limit that right on no demonstrable basis are UNLAWFUL."


Where in the bill of rights does it say that? I want to see where it says you have a natural born right to fly commercially.

1st Sgt USMC (ret) said...

RB, I do not work for the TSA and if I did I could not live with myself if I had allow a weapon get by me which was later used in doing arm on a domestic flight. I had enough responsibility to the relatives of my men keeping them alive during to 13 month tours of duty in Vietnam. Apparently you never lived in fear during combat or you wouldn't think the TSA are not serious about protecting the air travelers in the United States.

Apparently your site dog is unable to described the above pictures of the weapons confiscated in this report.

As always to you, SEMPER FIDELIS!

1st Sgt USMC (ret) said...

RB, I do not work for the TSA and if I did I could not live with myself if I had allowed a weapon get by me which was later used in doing harm on a domestic flight. I had enough responsibility to the relatives of my men keeping them alive during two 13 month tours of duty in Vietnam. Apparently you never lived in fear during combat or you wouldn't think the TSA are not serious about protecting the air travelers in the United States.

Apparently your site dog is unable to described the above pictures of the weapons confiscated in this report.

As always to you, SEMPER FIDELIS!

Anonymous said...

Shall we assume, West, that comments won't be approved and the census will be especially active while you are gone?

1st Sgt USMC, (ret) said...

Anonymous: I did take the oath of enlistment,in 1953, 1962, 1969 and 1974, using the term swearing or affirm to support and defend the United States Constitution against all enemies foreign and domestic. Domestically, 1969, Washington,DC during an anti war moratorium March led by Dr. Spock and the notorious Ted, (drown um ),Kennedy. If you are speaking of any other domestic enemies, are you speaking of the one who now lives in my White House, the one who has wiped his feet on the Constitution ? As far as foreign enemies, yes, I defended the Constitution afloat 400 miles off Club Gitmo, in 1962 during the Cuban Missile Crisis and then again 1966-1967, and 1970-1971 against the Viet Cong, (VC), and North Vietnam Army, (NVA).

Susan Richart, Cool Aid? You are really dating yourself. Today it is Crystal Lite, and Smart Water.

S Wayne, there is no alleged. However if you are a legal US citizen, and pay your annual Federal Income Tax, I want to thank you and all who pay their taxes, I gave up my military retired pay because I selected the Veterans Affairs payment which is for 100% Service Connected Disability, Due to Agent Orange. As long as you and others pay your taxes, I will continue to get my tax fee check every month along with another check tax free for Combat Related Special Compensation from the Navy Department totally approximately $6,000.Thank you very much. Oh yes, by the way I have been patted down, in fact it was this morning. Also had my bag searched twice, once for explosives, and once they found a cork screw bottle opener. They did not find explosives and returned the cork screw.

I appreciate all of your kind words. Marines are famous for their pictures, therefore,if you send me your mailing address, I will send you an autographed picture during Lam Son 719. Look that operation up on the internet. The South Vietnamese could have won the largest battle of the war. Why didn't they? Because two Dove Congressmen, got involved and we American Advisors were not allowed to cross into Loas and therefore the South had no close air support, etc.

Sure could have used you three and RB and all that wisdom.

S. Wayne said...

@ "1st Sgt USMC, (ret)" - you sure think you have a lot to prove to people you don't know or respect. Your reply was quite humorous.

Nice political rant and bashing of the current President of the United States too. You think that makes you a "man" or proves you are a Marine? No on both accounts.

You seem to be wrongly insinuating that I would be mad that my tax dollars pay for military wages and actual retired military pensions. That is simply ridiculous.

If you were actually patted down today (Why? What did you do wrong? Were you acting like a terrorist?), and the screener looked at and returned your cork screw, they appear to have actually followed procedure. A cork screw without a knife is allowed by the TSA...until a screener decides it isn't allowed. Looks like YOU are the one who should be thankful!

"Marines are famous for their pictures..." LOL! I thought they were famous for being tough soldiers, but okay, whatever you say, "retired Marine."

Finally, if you think "Crystal Lite" is a modern reference, you need to jump back at least decade. ROTF!

Susan Richart said...

To 1st Sgt USMC, (ret), it's Kool Aid, not Cool Aid.

Obviously, you do not understand the reference.

" "Drinking the Kool-Aid" is a figure of speech commonly used in the United States that refers to a person or group holding an unquestioned belief, argument, or philosophy without critical examination."

The above from Wiki.

Screen shot/DHS OIG Statement

Anonymous said...

Hey alleged Marine, why don't you just post this alleged picture you claim to have on the Internet? Or mail it to the blotter team? I'm sure they'd love to see it.

Anonymous said...

1st Sgt Ret -
I'd like to take you up on that autographed picture to put up in my office. It will be a great reminder of why we all serve however we can.

Please post your email if you can.

TSORon said...

RB said…
[[The Corbett ruling seems to be loaded with appealable decisions.]]

There was only one decision made during that case, the decision that he didn’t get his paperwork done in a timely manner. That is not appealable.

There were quite a few opinions provided by the court, opinions that you and Mr. Corbett will never agree with, but that is the way the system works. Next time, and I suspect given Mr. Corbett’s single-mindedness on the subject there will be several, maybe he should be more diligent in meeting the time frames set out by the judicial system.

GSOLTSO said...

Anon sez - "Shall we assume, West, that comments won't be approved and the census will be especially active while you are gone?"

I would never assume that, maybe the comments were not moderated quite as frequently, but I see that some comments were done while I was gone. As for the census being more or less active, I can not say.

Anon sez - "Hey alleged Marine, why don't you just post this alleged picture you claim to have on the Internet? Or mail it to the blotter team? I'm sure they'd love to see it."

I would like to point out to all of our readers that posting their email, or any personally identifiable information in an online open forum is not really the best of ideas. Soooo, I wouldn't do this if I were you unless it is an account you do not care about!

Another Anon sez - "1st Sgt Ret -
I'd like to take you up on that autographed picture to put up in my office. It will be a great reminder of why we all serve however we can.

Please post your email if you can."

Again, I would ask that all of our readers see the comment above and not post email addresses or personally identifiable information online in open forums unless they are using an account that they do not mind having SPAM, random sign-ups for things, directed emails that may or may not contain unsolicited commentary or possibly even threats. In short, do not post your personal email address or other personally identifiable information in public forums!

West
TSA Blog Team

Anonymous said...

In response to TSORon:

"Because there was a split between the judges, there is a higher chance now that the case will be accepted for review by either the full 11th Circuit or by the U.S. Supreme Court."

That's even better than an appeal!

screen shot

Anonymous said...

Regarding Jon Corbett, TSORon, consider that he could argue that the "60-day" rule does not apply to his lawsuit because the TSA failed to follow the law when it began using scanners. In fact, in spite of Court orders, it still has not followed the law and issued a final rule, so the use of whole body scanners are being used illegally.

screen shot

Wintermute said...

TSORon said...
" maybe he should be more diligent in meeting the time frames set out by the judicial system. "

Again TSORon is misrepresenting facts, weakening his arguments. Was the case filed too late? No, it was not. The government argued that is was filed with the wrong court. When they somehow got a judge to agree, the case was PROMPTLY filed with one to the government's liking. Because they couldn't pull the venue shenanigans again, they argued that it was filed too late. Technically it was, but technically it was not.

Basically, this boils down to judges doing everything they can to punt on the issues, because they'd rather abdicate their duties to the People than stand up to the TSA and DHS.

TSORon said...

Wintermute said...
[[venue shenanigans]]

So what you are saying is that it’s the governments fault that Mr. Corbett didn’t file his initial suit in the proper court? Interesting perspective.

Wintermute said...

TSORon said...
"So what you are saying is that it’s the governments fault that Mr. Corbett didn’t file his initial suit in the proper court? Interesting perspective. "

No, I'm saying that Mr Corbett believed he was filing with the correct court, and the government created the delay in filing with the one they consider "proper" by challenging it. That delay should not then be used to say "sorry, too late." If the government actually thought they would win the case, then why argue on BS technicalities?

Sandra said...

TSORon, had Mr. Corbett initially attempted to file his complaint in the the wrong court, that court would have so advised him. That it didn't and that the TSA pushed for removal of the complaint to a different court, does make venue choice the government's responsibility.

Anonymous said...

Screener ron, you sure do seem to be taking Corbett's lawsuit too personally.

RB said...

1st Sgt USMC (ret) said...
RB, I do not work for the TSA and if I did I could not live with myself if I had allowed a weapon get by me which was later used in doing harm on a domestic flight. I had enough responsibility to the relatives of my men keeping them alive during two 13 month tours of duty in Vietnam. Apparently you never lived in fear during combat or you wouldn't think the TSA are not serious about protecting the air travelers in the United States.

Apparently your site dog is unable to described the above pictures of the weapons confiscated in this report.

As always to you, SEMPER FIDELIS!

October 2, 2014 at 10:37 PM
...............
A little late to respond and realize you may not see this but I too served in the military. Long enough to draw retirement pay. I didn't have an admin position either.

RB said...

GSOLTSO said...

...
RB sez - "Neither are cupcakes, purses, and other such items but that didn't stop TSA from confiscating these things."
....
As for the purse, which one are you speaking about?
....


Teen stopped at airport for design on purse

"Vanessa Gibbs, 17, claims the Transportation Security Administration stopped her at the security gate because of the design of a gun on her handbag.

After agents figured out the gun was a fake, Gibbs said, TSA told her to check the bag or turn it over."