Friday, September 19, 2014

TSA Week in Review - 33 Firearms Discovered This Week in Carry-On Bags (22 Were Loaded)


Three firearms discovered at a Chicago O'Hare TSA Checkpoint
33 Firearms Discovered This Week – Of the 33 firearms, 26 were loaded and seven had rounds chambered.

Artfully Concealed Prohibited Items – It’s important to examine your bags prior to traveling to ensure you are not carrying prohibited items. If a prohibited item is discovered in your bag or on your body, you could be cited and possibly arrested by local law enforcement. Here are a few examples from this week where prohibited items were found by our officers in strange places. 
A hairbrush dagger was discovered at Fairbanks


Discovered at CHS
Inert Ordnance and Grenades etc. – We continue to find inert grenades and other weaponry on a weekly basis. Please keep in mind that if an item looks like a real bomb, grenade, mine, etc., it is prohibited. When these items are found at a checkpoint or in checked baggage, they can cause significant delays because the explosives detection professionals must resolve the alarm to determine the level of threat. Even if they are novelty items, you cannot bring them on a plane.  Read here on why inert items cause problems.
  • Two inert grenades were discovered this week in carry-on bags at Charleston (CHS), and Atlanta (ATL).
Stun Guns – Seven stun guns were discovered this week at checkpoints across the nation: Two were discovered at Las Vegas (LAS), two at San Jose (SJC), and the remainder were discovered at Atlanta (ATL), Lubbock (LBB), and Memphis (MEM).

Miscellaneous Prohibited Items In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons and many other prohibited items too numerous to note.
Knives Discovered in Carry-on Bags at EWR







Bullet Knife Discovered at SFO
Ammunition discovered in carry-on bags at IAH

Ammunition – When packed properly, ammunition can be transported in your checked baggage, but it is never permissible to pack ammo in your carry-on bag.

Firearms Discovered at (L-R) MSY & GPT
Clockwise From Top Left, Firearms Discovered at: HOU, PIT, GPT & RSW
33 Firearms Discovered This Week – Of the 33 firearms, 26 were loaded and seven had rounds chambered.
*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates.

You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms. Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $7,500. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions, that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

If you haven’t seen it yet, make sure you check out our TSA Blog Year in Review for 2013. You can also check out 2011 & 2012 as well.

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If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact us by clicking here.

56 comments:

BWFALLI said...

Again my question--What does TSA do with the found materials? Are they being auctioned off or sold anywhere? Anyone know anything about this?

Curious, George

Anonymous said...

No wonder why we are delayed through security. These idiots bringing on suspicious stuff.
They should be prosecuted for security alarm.

Anonymous said...

What airport has the highest number of found guns?

Jonathan said...

Excellent info here, I am currently doing some research and found exactly what I was looing for.

Susan Richart said...

http://7online.com/news/passengers-with-isis-t-shirts-detained-at-jfk/314528/

The fear-mongering continues. I would bet it was TSA BDOs who called law enforcement on these people, thereby showing us once again how useless the TSA is.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

choc said...

You'll notice, RB, that perhaps the best and most reliable level of security, Passengers, is last on the TSA's list. And how long did it take the TSA to even acknowledge that Passengers are an extremely important aspect of security?

Susan Richart said...

West, the comments posted by "choc" in this thread, "mini market" in the thread below this one and "daily deals" in last week's recitation about dangerous items found need to be removed.

You'll note the one by "choc" is just a copy and paste of one of my comments. If you click on "choc" it links to another website.

Although I've not clicked on "mini market" and "daily deals" I would imagine doing so leads somewhere else.

SSSS for Some Reason said...

"...Miscellaneous Prohibited Items – In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly, .... and many other prohibited items too numerous to note."

Why?

You have a blog. There is an unlimited amount of posts you can make. So why couldn't you list them all?

It's not like you don't have the time from dealing with any actual terrorists or anything.

Anonymous said...

"...Anonymous said...
No wonder why we are delayed through security. These idiots bringing on suspicious stuff.
They should be prosecuted for security alarm."

What would the charge be? And wouldn't having to call the police every time cause even more of a delay?

RB said...

BWFALLI said...Again my question--What does TSA do with the found materials? Are they being auctioned off or sold anywhere? Anyone know anything about this?Curious, GeorgeSeptember 19, 2014 at 8:48 PM
*******
Here is one answer to your question.

http://blog.tsa.gov/2009/09/what-happens-to-your-prohibited-items.html

The bigger issue is the legality of TSA's program of confiscating non-WEI materials.

The law authorizes TSA to search for and prohibit WEI to enter the sterile area of airports, that is the extent of the law.

When TSA prohibits non-WEI items they are in violation of the law, when TSA confiscates non-WEI items they have committed and act of theft.

RB said...

 Jonathan said...Excellent info here, I am currently doing some research and found exactly what I was looing for.September 20, 2014 at 2:37 AM
====================
How many air rifles do you sell, Jonathan?

RB said...

http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/top-level-turnover-makes-it-harder-for-dhs-to-stay-on-top-of-evolving-threats/2014/09/21/ca7919a6-39d7-11e4-9c9f-ebb47272e40e_story.html


"As evidence of the toll this is taking, Kasprisin cited the results of agency tests in which undercover operatives try to sneak weapons or explosives through airport security. He said security employees are increasingly missing the contraband, with the frequency of failures reaching a “frightening” level."

Discussions suggesting that TSA screeners miss 70% of threat items may actually under estimate the dsymal performance of TSA screeners.

Not to mention the problems of trying to properly train an unstable workforce.

It's time to return screening functions to the airports and the airlines.

Susan Richart said...

"As evidence of the toll this is taking, Kasprisin cited the results of agency tests in which undercover operatives try to sneak weapons or explosives through airport security. He said security employees are increasingly missing the contraband, with the frequency of failures reaching a “frightening” level."

http://tinyurl.com/mfcgeml

Snort!

If this is censored while you leave up the 4 posts that contravene your posting rules, the OIG will be advised.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Anonymous said...

Another week, another complete lack of anything found with your slow, invasive, and ineffective naked body scanners. Care to tell us how many people had to be physically searched after false alarms from your naked body scanners? Or why Curtis Burns, West Cooper, and the rest of your "blog team" refuse to acknowledge or answer this question?

Anonymous said...

Susan and Choc, do either of you want to do anything but complain about TSA? Get your own soap box. Neither of you are talking abou tthe topic at hand (guns found). If you want to complain or comment about this article, go for it, otherwise you're just seem to be complaining to complain. It really takes away your credibility as so many complainers do. None of you really have a clue what TSA does or why they do it. You just complain about it. Perhaps if you thought for a second and considered the threat, almpost everything they do makes perfect sense..to a logical thinker anyway. but haters will hate...
Thanks TSA for what you do and do so well...

Anonymous said...

Susan--several of the alleged ISIS fighters currently in the Middle East region came from the MSP area. Some of us think the TSA used good judgment by further questioning the passengers. I can see how that would raise eyebrows as they came through security. Can't you? Better safe than sorry.

Bill said...

Perhaps more people would have survived 9/11 if someone would had a weapon in the cabin rather at home or in checked luggage.

RB said...

Anonymous said...
Susan--several of the alleged ISIS fighters currently in the Middle East region came from the MSP area. Some of us think the TSA used good judgment by further questioning the passengers. I can see how that would raise eyebrows as they came through security. Can't you? Better safe than sorry.

September 22, 2014 at 10:21 AM
_________________________________

How does an illegal interrogation by TSA improve security?

A T-shirt is not WEI. If the individual is search for WEI then TSA has done their job and the person is not a threat.

If your and others have paid attention to the news you would know that TSA's performance is dismal. I would suggest that going back to basics and doing only what is allowed by law would improve that performance. TSA has time and time again instituted programs and policies that do nothing to improve security. A couple of cases to point to are the TSA BDO's proven by GAO to be no better than a person off the street just guessing, and let us not forget the Mexicutioners that TSA is famous for. Then we can look at all of the equipment that TSA purchased with taxpayer dollars that just didn't work. Remember the Explosive Trace Portals? How much of our money did TSA blow on those devices? And what happened to all of the thousands of hand held metal detectors?

TSA has no mandate to question people about their clothing, NONE. Doing so exceeds the law and makes TSA employees engaged in such activities criminals!

Bottom line is that TSA and its 60,000 employees are ineffective and extremely wasteful of taxpayer dollars.

Anonymous said...

It's so easy to sit on the sidelines and criticize someone else's performance, isn't it? I recommend you put in a job application with them and teach them how to best prevent aircraft for being used as either weapons or targets of a political statement. What was that line from the movie "A Few Good Men?" Illegal interrogation--can I assume you have a law degree?

GSOLTSO said...

Susan sez - "The fear-mongering continues. I would bet it was TSA BDOs who called law enforcement on these people, thereby showing us once again how useless the TSA is."

You would lose that bet based upon the statements in this article.
From the TSA sposkeperson on scene "Upon landing at JFK, the flight crew requested that the airplane be screened for explosives. An explosive detection canine cleared the aircraft for continued operation."

Susan also sez - "Although I've not clicked on "mini market" and "daily deals" I would imagine doing so leads somewhere else."

Agreed, many of the posters here have links embedded in their names - many of them I would probably not click on to follow.

SSSS sez - "Why?

You have a blog. There is an unlimited amount of posts you can make. So why couldn't you list them all?

It's not like you don't have the time from dealing with any actual terrorists or anything."

We have limited membership on the blog - I am a regular frontliner from GSO that works here on the blog in limited fashion. Every other member listed or participating in the blog has other duties and job descriptions that they are responsible for - hence the delay in comment moderation from time to time. I wish each of us had more time to gin up tons of posts and links, but each of us has other responsibilities we have to perform.

RB sez - "How many air rifles do you sell, Jonathan?"

Probably as many as he possibly can.

Bill sez - "Perhaps more people would have survived 9/11 if someone would had a weapon in the cabin rather at home or in checked luggage."

Perhaps, perhaps not. However, currently, the regulations prevent carrying "weapons" in their carry-on or person.

West
TSA Blog Team

RB said...

Why is the TSA Blog Team allowing poster with clearly commercial ties to their user name.

"We will not post comments that are spam, are clearly off topic or that promote services or products."

Seems the TSA Blog is more interested in censorship of speech it doesn't like than following its own rules.

Susan Richart said...

West wrote:

"You would lose that bet based upon the statements in this article."

Click on the link and one arrives at at 404 error code.

Care to try again, West?

Susan Richart said...

West also wrote:

"Agreed, many of the posters here have links embedded in their names - many of them I would probably not click on to follow."

However, when you have been advised that these posters have copied and pasted others' comments in order to try to entice readers to click on their names, then that is SPAM and in violation of the TOS, just as is the use of vulgar and abusive language. The post made September 12 about which several readers complained still stands, as do the comments of those mentioned above.

Anonymous said...

...None of you really have a clue what TSA does or why they do it. You just complain about it. Perhaps if you thought for a second and considered the threat, almpost everything they do makes perfect sense..to a logical thinker anyway. but haters will hate..."

...and people without a supportable argument will attempt to deflect through use of ad hominem attacks and gaslighting and may also devolve to the recitation of pop culture cliches. Please do provide proof that TSA procedures/processes are logical and effective. TSA has not provided such proof to the public, so I do not think you have it, but please try.

Anonymous said...

"I recommend you put in a job application with them and teach them how to best prevent aircraft for being used as either weapons or targets of a political statement."

There is no need to apply. Why would a terrorist try to re-create 9/11 when cockpit doors are secure and when passengers and crew have learned that remaining passive offers no protection? A 9/11-style attack is no longer viable.

Anonymous said...

"Better safe than sorry."

Where do you draw the line? Better to have body cavity searches than be sorry? Better to ban certain classes of passengers en masse (e.g, those who have ever traveled to the Middle East or adjacent nations) than be sorry? Better to expose millions of travelers to medically unnecessary x-rays linked to cancer than be sorry?

RB said...

For those of you who put your trust in TSA employees to keep you safe I would suggest rethinking that trust.

The sentencing of a former TSA employee!

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-tsa-screener-who-oversaw-drug-smuggling-operation-at-lax-sentenced-20140922-story.html

Naral Richardson, 32, of South Los Angeles, pleaded guilty in March to a drug-trafficking conspiracy count, admitting that he used his contacts at LAX to facilitate and profit from five “pass-throughs” of drugs at the airport. He facilitated the movement of about 45 kilograms of cocaine, 4 kilograms of methamphetamine and 22 kilograms of marijuana through security screening checkpoints over a six-month period in 2011, according to prosecutors.

Richardson “routinely allowed high-volume drug traffickers to pass drugs through his security screening lane for as much as $1,000 per pass-through,” prosecutors wrote in a sentencing memo.

GSOLTSO said...

Susan sez - "Click on the link and one arrives at at 404 error code.

Care to try again, West?"

Yup, no clue where the error is in that previous link, but try this one out.

West
TSA Blog Team

Susan Richart said...

"Yup, no clue where the error is in that previous link, but try this one out."

"Untrusted connection."

Want to try yet again, West?

Anonymous said...

"... Anonymous said...
It's so easy to sit on the sidelines and criticize someone else's performance, isn't it?"

It IS pretty easy to criticize the TSA when they do such a dismal job at something that should be really simple.

How many people here have offered solutions how many times since this blog started? The TSA can write the standards and turn the actual security duties back over to the airlines and airports. That will provide much better security that is much more effective and magnitudes more efficient.

GSOLTSO said...

Susan sez - "Want to try yet again, West?"

Not sure what is going on with that page either, try this one. It is a completely different page with the same info and the name of the spokesperson.

West
TSA Blog Team

RB said...

We have limited membership on the blog - I am a regular frontliner from GSO that works here on the blog in limited fashion. Every other member listed or participating in the blog has other duties and job descriptions that they are responsible for - hence the delay in comment moderation from time to time. I wish each of us had more time to gin up tons of posts and links, but each of us has other responsibilities we have to perform.

RB sez - "How many air rifles do you sell, Jonathan?"

Probably as many as he possibly can.



West
TSA Blog Team

September 23, 2014 at 10:55 AM

........................
I can see the list of TSA Bloggers.

What I wonder about is why we never see any effort by others on the team to respond to the many questions that are asked?

There's Bob, Lynn, and yourself and all we see is an occasional response from you but not anyone else.

Secondly, is it appropriate for a poster to have their User Name link to another Website than is commercial in nature as was the poster that linked back to Air Rifles?

I am very confused about the TSA Blog's comment restrictions seeing as how the TSA Blog has routinely violated my First Amendment Civil Rights through censorship of my comments that meet all of the stated TSA Blog guidelines?

RB said...

GSOLTSO said...
Susan sez - "Want to try yet again, West?"

Not sure what is going on with that page either, try this one. It is a completely different page with the same info and the name of the spokesperson.

West
TSA Blog Team

September 24, 2014 at 10:07 AM
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
West, can you tell us how a printed logo could represent a threat to commercial aviation?

RB said...

"Naral Richardson, 32, of South Los Angeles, pleaded guilty in March to a drug-trafficking conspiracy count, admitting that he used his contacts at LAX to facilitate and profit from five “pass-throughs” of drugs at the airport. He facilitated the movement of about 45 kilograms of cocaine, 4 kilograms of methamphetamine and 22 kilograms of marijuana through security screening checkpoints over a six-month period in 2011, according to prosecutors."

What if it had been something other than drugs? Something like explosives?

I have to ask again, why are TSA employee and other Airport employees not screened 100% of the time when they enter the secure area?

From a Risk Based analysis which group of people have the greater opportunity to introduce contraband to an airplane, Passengers or Airport Workers?

I think the answer is clearly Airport Workers since TSA has failed in its responsibilities to screen these people.

Anonymous said...

Is there anywhere (I have yet to find it, if it exists) that the TSA publishes a comprehensive, defined list of what constitutes a "gun part" part?
I have read reference to 'receivers' and frames, leaving a lot of ambiguity.
Is a $1,700.00 scope considered a gun part? How about the sling for a rifle? Maybe an iron sight that bolts on; is that considered a gun part?
I ask this as I witnessed somebody detained today for having a new, un-opened, rifle magazine in his carry on. He was professionally dressed, polite and shocked when he was detained. TSA confiscated the item, subjected him to further search etc. I later saw him and he told me they filed a report on him and he would be hearing from them in some formal manner.
He said had he thought it an issue, would have shipped from his office, saved the hassle, a report, missing a flight, etc.
Particularly disconcerting - the local law enforcement did not consider it a gun part but TSA did. Your site states local law enforcement has the ultimate authority.
How is a magazine a gun part? How is it a threat without ammunition? If this is a part, then a scope would be a part, just as the other items mentioned?
Seems arbitrary.
Appreciate any direction you can provide.

Anonymous said...

interesting read on the people scanners.
http://www.courthousenews.com/2014/09/24/71774.htm

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
defined list of what constitutes a "gun part" part?...
Seems arbitrary.

~~~~~

First, they can't tell you because that is SSI. If they provided a list then the terrorists would know what to do to get past security and make it to their destination.

Second, yes it is arbitrary. Which is normal. Remember, these are the same people that will allow over twenty ounces of liquids through security if contained in small three ounce containers that are in a magic quart-sized zippy bag, but won't let a single 16 ounce bottle of water through security because it might be dangerous.

RB said...

So many questions and no TSA Backbone to answer.

Does anyone wonder how TSA earned the reputation is so deserves?

RB said...

First, they can't tell you because that is SSI. If they provided a list then the terrorists would know what to do to get past security and make it to their destination.

Second, yes it is arbitrary. Which is normal. Remember, these are the same people that will allow over twenty ounces of liquids through security if contained in small three ounce containers that are in a magic quart-sized zippy bag, but won't let a single 16 ounce bottle of water through security because it might be dangerous.

September 25, 2014 at 9:17 AM
.....................
How can providing a concise list of items that are never allowed by TSA weaken security? Even suggesting such is ludicrous.

The concept of SSI and its use should be outlawed. If the information is sensitive then classify it according to standing law.

One country, one classification system.

If someone wants to get something past TSA security all they need do is bribe an airport employee or TSA employee who enter secure areas without screening.

And we are all waiting for an explanation of how several 100 ml bottles of some unknown liquid is safe when the same amount move to one container is suddenly not safe.

TSA can't answer that question unless they want to look more foolish than they already do which would be a hard feat to achieve.

TSA is staffed by 60,000 or so incompetents.

Anonymous said...

Propaganda is just as deadly as a weapon.

Wayne Elsey said...

This is insane! imagine if there was fundraising for the TSA!

Anonymous said...

West,

"Wayne Elsey said...
This is insane! imagine if there was fundraising for the TSA!

September 26, 2014 at 2:55 PM"

The above comment violates the TSA Blog policy because the comment is obviously clickbait and the link attached to "Wayne's" name is some weird commercial URL.

Wintermute said...

Wayne Elsey said...
"This is insane! imagine if there was fundraising for the TSA!

"September 26, 2014 at 2:55 PM"

Ummm... Spam... Against posted blog guidelines, yet comment approved, while countless comments that fall within said Unconstitutional guidelines are never approved. Why is that?

Susan Richart said...

Thank you, Anonymous and Wintermute. Perhaps West or Bob will listen to you and remove these spam posts.

Anonymous said...

"When TSA prohibits non-WEI items they are in violation of the law, when TSA confiscates non-WEI items they have committed and act of theft."

TSA does not confiscate anything. Iteams are either voluntarily abandonded or in the case of illegal items, they are taken by law enforcment. TSA takes nothing

Anonymous said...

"Why would a terrorist try to re-create 9/11 when cockpit doors are secure and when passengers and crew have learned that remaining passive offers no protection? A 9/11-style attack is no longer viable."

And sadley, some people are nieve enough to think this is the only threat we as Americans face. Thus the nay-sayers we see here.

Anonymous said...

This blog never ceases to amaze me. I read it every week and am always amazed at how ignorant our publi is. I am not harvard trained and I can answer almost every question I see posted. Why does TSA do this, why does TSA do that, the answers are so simple. Why does TSA not release information? Because they dont want information in the hands of potentail terrorist who could use it to exploit loop holes in the system. If peo0ple just read their own posts, sadley you would see just how ingnorant you sound. Im glad you guys are not in charge of securing the transportation system. Im sure terror groupds disagree with me.

RB said...

Anonymous said...
"When TSA prohibits non-WEI items they are in violation of the law, when TSA confiscates non-WEI items they have committed and act of theft."

TSA does not confiscate anything. Iteams are either voluntarily abandonded or in the case of illegal items, they are taken by law enforcment. TSA takes nothing

September 29, 2014 at 10:02 AM
................
Then TSA will have no issue with me taking a Venti Starbucks coffee through the checkpoint.

It is not WEI so of no concern to TSA.

Susan Richart said...

From the post that "anonymous" made at 10:02 a.m., we can assume that he/she is a screener because of the claim that the TSA does not confiscate items, sticking to the party line that items are voluntarily abandoned. (There's another way we can determine that the poster is a TSA employee. Anyone want to guess what it is?)

From his/her post at 10:06 a.m., I would ask that we be enlightened as to what those those other threats are to which you allude.

Finally, from his/her 10:12 a.m. comment, I would reply that any terrorist worth his salt knows what those loop holes are.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Wintermute said...

Anonymous said...

"Why does TSA not release information? Because they dont want information in the hands of potentail terrorist who could use it to exploit loop holes in the system."

This is what those of us who know a little about security call "security through obscurity." Those of us who know a little about security also know that "security through obscurity" does not work. Never has. Never will.

GSOLTSO said...

RB sez - "What I wonder about is why we never see any effort by others on the team to respond to the many questions that are asked?

There's Bob, Lynn, and yourself and all we see is an occasional response from you but not anyone else.

Secondly, is it appropriate for a poster to have their User Name link to another Website than is commercial in nature as was the poster that linked back to Air Rifles?"

The other names on the team do much more of the back end, such as generating the posts, the research and compilation that goes into them and the interfacing with other HQ elements to make certain all of our posts are compliant with SSI, Manangement Directives, SOP and any other legal challenges that may pop up with them. I am the one lucky enough to do most of the commenting right now (which in turn makes you the lucky ones too right?... right?).

As for links in the names, they are allowed as long as the comments are on topic and relevant to the conversation (and as long as the name is not vulgar or offensive).

RB also sez - "West, can you tell us how a printed logo could represent a threat to commercial aviation?"

I am unaware of how a printed logo could be a specific threat to aviation (unless it is some form of explosive held in place on the shirt in some fashion, which is highly improbable) - however, if you are referring to the tourists with the ISIS shirts, that situation was initiated by the airline upon arrival. Once requests are made by the airlines, TSA has certain protocols they have to follow.

Anon sez - "Is there anywhere (I have yet to find it, if it exists) that the TSA publishes a comprehensive, defined list of what constitutes a "gun part" part?
I have read reference to 'receivers' and frames, leaving a lot of ambiguity.
Is a $1,700.00 scope considered a gun part? How about the sling for a rifle? Maybe an iron sight that bolts on; is that considered a gun part?"

The most comprehensive list I have found is located at this link. It indicates "All firearms, ammunition and firearm parts, including firearm frames, receivers, clips and magazines are prohibited in carry-on baggage.". *A good policy to follow (that will almost always prevent any kind of issues) is anything that is part of the weapon that is not specifically named as allowed, should be in checked baggage. The above link further explains that a scope is specifically named as allowed in carry-on baggage as well as checked baggage. I also recommend that you research the laws where you are traveling to, as they may be different than the laws where you are departing (for example, Amarillo, TX and New York, NY have vastly different gun regulations that apply with regard to firearms).

West
TSA Blog Team

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
--Is there anywhere (I have yet to find it, if it exists) that the TSA publishes a comprehensive, defined list of what constitutes a "gun part" part?--

Its not just TSA there Anon, try and find that list you ask for anywhere. Anywhere at all. Cant be done, there is none. There are lists of basic parts, but there is no comprehensive listing of all gun parts anywhere. Asking for something that does not exist is not rational.

Wintermute said...

TSAnonymous said...

"Its not just TSA there Anon, try and find that list you ask for anywhere. Anywhere at all. Cant be done, there is none. There are lists of basic parts, but there is no comprehensive listing of all gun parts anywhere. Asking for something that does not exist is not rational."

But it is rational to expect the flying public to know the rules when you not only refuse to publish them, but you've gone out of your way to make sure they're SSI?

Luke Oleary said...

How stupid can you be to bring a 12 gauge on a plane

Faith said...

This is why we always have to deal with the TSA because of dumb actions like this.

Jonson richard said...

It always amazes me what people think they can get away with. I'm grateful that these things are being found and confiscated.