Monday, September 15, 2014

Summer Wait Times Down Despite Busiest Summer in Years


Wait times at the security checkpoint are way down compared to last summer. So, what are we doing differently? Well, we’re providing the most efficient security in the most effective way possible. .

(Click for larger picture and more info)
All of our
layers of security are still firmly in place. You would think all of the layers would slow things down, but we’ve become more efficient by changing the way we do business, and risk-based security programs like TSA Pre✓™ have a lot to do with that. TSA Pre✓™ is based on the understanding that the vast majority of people traveling pose little to no threat to aviation and therefore TSA can expedite their security screening process at the checkpoint.


Our goal is to get travelers through the line in 20 minutes or less. In most cases, it’s far less than that!

Take a look at some wait time statistics from June through August:
  • TSA officers screened about 173 million people. 
  • 99.6 percent of all passengers waited in line less than 20 minutes. 
  • 99.98 percent of passengers in TSA Pre✓™ moved through the checkpoint in less than 10 minutes.
So, while things are moving faster, our vigilance remains the same.

Have you applied for TSA Pre✓™ yet?  

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33 comments:

Susan Richart said...

If the "vast majority" of travelers don't pose a threat, then why is TSA looking to have 85% of passengers getting expedited screening by the end of 2015?

Shouldn't TSA be granting expedited screening right now to 99% of passengers on a daily basis without their having to pay your extortion?

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

RB said...

Are wait times down (so TSA claims) because TSA is herding travelers to Pre Check lanes without regard to Risk Based Screening?

Sherine E Gabriel said...

Really?How I about wait so much?

Katherine Dain said...

My husband and I got our TSA Pre check and we love it. It's been very nice and fast.

Anonymous said...


What in God's name is the point in searching who has already left a plane after flying without incident and without just cause?

https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20140913/06350828511/tsa-not-sure-if-it-groped-man-before-flight-demands-to-grope-him-after-flight-is-over.shtml

Anonymous said...

Do the wait times include screening after the plane lands like this guy:

http://www.infowars.com/video-tsa-demands-to-conduct-full-body-pat-down-on-man-after-his-plane-already-landed/

I'm still trying to figure out what the point of screening a passenger who has arrived at his final destination. Would he have been forced to surrender any liquids over 3 oz? It he was a serious threat, shouldn't the plane have been diverted out of an abundance of caution?

Anonymous said...

I managed to qualify for Pre Check a couple of months ago. I never paid for it. An IPad randomly told me which line to go to. It was assigning lots of people who didn't appear to be frequent flyers to that line too.

It seems that if an IPad was a good enough determination that most people in line weren't a threat, that everyone should be subjected to the Pre Check level of screening by default. Suspicious people and an occasional random passenger should get more screening, but 99%+ should get the Pre Check screening.

Anonymous said...

some additional suggestions for TSA to continue to reduce wait times:

1) eliminate TSA and return to pre-911 screening. the TSA makes things no more secure, and arguably less secure, since the last red team results made available to the public indicate that TSA is allowing 70% of prohibited items through, as opposed to 60% or lower in testing of the old systems. in addition, the 911 attacks focused on 2 gaps in security: unsecured cockpit doors, and the training of flight crews and passengers to be compliant. both of those are now corrected - no one is going to take over an airliner with a penknife.

2) full and total transparency of all DHS and TSA regulations, rules, procedures, and watch/no-fly lists, as well as public comment periods for new rules, and an independent appeal process for those placed on no fly or terrorist watch lists (as ordered by the federal courts).

3) eliminate the Pre-Bribe, er, Pre-Check program. it is a waste of taxpayer dollars as well as flat out insulting to be required to pay to have a background check done in order to be screened in a semi-sane way, when I hold a security clearance and a concealed wepaons permit, both of which require a more thorough background check than TSA is likely to do.

4) eliminate ID requirements. it is unConstitutional (freedom to travel domestically is not guaranteed only if the govt can ID you), and it contributes nothing to security. what does it matter if you know my name, if I am carrying a bomb? why is my name any damn business of yours if I am not carrying a bomb or
intending some kind of threat?

Anonymous said...

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense.

Walter said...

If wait times are so short in the first place, and people are being given "precheck" for free anyway, why would anyone give up their privacy and hard earned money for your failed exhortion plan, blotter team?

Explain how taking naked pics of the flying public is faster and less invasive than WTMD and HHMD?

Explain why everyone getting on a plane is threatened with sexual assault, even if they pay you off through the precheck scheme.

For gods sakes, tell the truth for once.

Adrian said...

Please provide some evidence that PreCheck can effectively determine whether an applicant poses less of a risk than a non-applicant. Every study I've read about has failed to find any correlation between passenger profiles and their risk.

RB said...

Anonymous said...
I managed to qualify for Pre Check a couple of months ago. I never paid for it. An IPad randomly told me which line to go to. It was assigning lots of people who didn't appear to be frequent flyers to that line too.

It seems that if an IPad was a good enough determination that most people in line weren't a threat, that everyone should be subjected to the Pre Check level of screening by default. Suspicious people and an occasional random passenger should get more screening, but 99%+ should get the Pre Check screening.

September 16, 2014 at 8:55 AM
...................
Having a Randomized pick which screening lane you go to is what TSA calls Risk Based Screening.

Apparently no intelligence is required to determine risk at TSA.

Anonymous said...

Why is Precheck not the default level of screening for ALL passengers, instead of a perk doled out to the wealthy, elite, and lucky?

Would Precheck exist if your misbegotten joke of an agency hadn't made the idiotic decision to use slow, invasive, and dangerously untested naked body scanners and then implement them in the worst possible manner in 2010?

Anonymous said...

Can we get some comment on the asinine attempt to screen Kahler Nygard at his destination?

Preferably with a statement from the TSO on the state of his self-esteem since realizing that there is little he can do to assert control over someone who doesn't need to get on an airplane, please.

RB said...

Anonymous said...

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military..........
_____________________________________

TSA would have given Pre-Check to mass murderer Nadal Hasan, a former Army Officer, just because he was active military.

That's how TSA's Pre Check works.

Anonymous said...

One Hundred Seventy Three Million people waiting on TSA for about 15 minutes per screening.

Who wants to convert that to non-productive man days lost for no good reasons?

Anonymous said...

"Would Precheck exist if your misbegotten joke of an agency hadn't made the idiotic decision to use slow, invasive, and dangerously untested naked body scanners and then implement them in the worst possible manner in 2010?"

Agreed! How can TSA celebrate the time savings offered by PreCheck and risk-based screening when what slows screening down in the first place are TSA's ineffective body scanners, full patdowns, and excessive item prohibitions???

RB said...

Reviewing the graphic "Layers of U.S. Aviation Security" will result in some serious questions of just who is formulating security planning at TSA.

Let us take a look and ask a few questions;

Customs and Border Protections, is listed towards the left side of the graphic and we all know that CBP has completely failed in their responsibility and duties of securing our borders. No one knows who is in this country and even then CBP is issuing paper documents to UNKNOWNS to travel without ID. CBP is to busy baking cakes to do any real work on the border.

Behavior Detection Officers, again through GAO reports we all know that BDO's are no more of a security asset than a random person off the streets. A complete waste of effort and tax dollars.

Travel Document Checkers, there has never been a case made that looking at ID's and Boarding Passes add anything to aviation security or evidence that doing so makes anyone safer. Those assets would be better used to screen airport workers who actually present a real threat that TSA refuses to take action to address.

Much like TSA claims of being a Security agency is just a wisp of smoke the 20 layers of security that TSA likes to brag about is another example of TSA incompetence.

For the Eight Billion Dollars a year that TSA costs taxpayers we can do better, much better!

SSSS for Some Reason said...

"...Well, we’re providing the most efficient security in the most effective way possible. ."

That is an untrue statement.

SSSS for Some Reason said...

Anonymous said...
One Hundred Seventy Three Million people waiting on TSA for about 15 minutes per screening.

Who wants to convert that to non-productive man days lost for no good reasons?

~~~~~~~~~~

Lets give the TSA credit for half because the screening isn't optional.

And it makes the math easy.

So 73 mil times 7 minutes, carry the two, convert to hours then days....

972 Years of People Time.

And that only takes into account the average passengers, not any other part of the process including the time required for false-positives from the inefficient scanners or time wasted trying to screen people at their destination after the flight is over.

RB said...

SSSS for Some Reason said...
Anonymous said...
One Hundred Seventy Three Million people waiting on TSA for about 15 minutes per screening.

Who wants to convert that to non-productive man days lost for no good reasons?

~~~~~~~~~~

Lets give the TSA credit for half because the screening isn't optional.

And it makes the math easy.

So 73 mil times 7 minutes, carry the two, convert to hours then days....

972 Years of People Time.

And that only takes into account the average passengers, not any other part of the process including the time required for false-positives from the inefficient scanners or time wasted trying to screen people at their destination after the flight is over.

September 17, 2014 at 11:04 AM
.....................
And as stated in the article that was only for June through August.

So that is 972 man years per quarter or 3,888 man years wasted by TSA each year.

Using 7 minutes per screening is being very generous towards TSA.
I think the number is much higher.

And TSA is still patting itself on the back!

Susan Richart said...

"Reviewing the graphic "Layers of U.S. Aviation Security" will result in some serious questions of just who is formulating security planning at TSA."

You'll notice, RB, that perhaps the best and most reliable level of security, Passengers, is last on the TSA's list. And how long did it take the TSA to even acknowledge that Passengers are an extremely important aspect of security?

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Anonymous said...

SSSS for Some Reason said...
Anonymous said...
One Hundred Seventy Three Million people waiting on TSA for about 15 minutes per screening.

Who wants to convert that to non-productive man days lost for no good reasons?

~~~~~~~~~~

Lets give the TSA credit for half because the screening isn't optional.

And it makes the math easy.

So 73 mil times 7 minutes, carry the two, convert to hours then days....

972 Years of People Time.

And that only takes into account the average passengers, not any other part of the process including the time required for false-positives from the inefficient scanners or time wasted trying to screen people at their destination after the flight is over.

September 17, 2014 at 11:04 AM
..................................Just noticed the error in your calculation.

You only allowed for 73 million travelers but TSA stated it was 173 million from June through August. Looks like you need to add a 100 million people to your numbers.

FredKlein said...

Of course it's faster- you people aren't even bothering to do your jobs right:

"An agent at TSA Pre-check in Atlanta last month ... failed to notice that a woman from Long Island had the wrong boarding pass. Not only did she get through him, but she made it past the gate agent ... before boarding a Delta flight to New York from Atlanta's Hartsfield-Jackson Airport.

How'd it happen? Like many passengers who don't have an Epson Bubble Jet at home, Donna Gold, from Syosset, New York, printed her boarding pass at the airport -- except this one had another passenger's name, Mark Dornan, on it. Her luggage was also tagged incorrectly.

Gold proceeded to show her false boarding pass, along with her I.D. to the aforementioned TSA agent. As she told CBS 2, “He asked me to remove my sunglasses — checking my driver’s license, supposedly, against this boarding pass — and he ushered me right through”.
"

- http://www.thrillist.com/travel/nation/new-york-woman-boards-delta-flight-with-wrong-boarding-pass

So, your agents cannot even match the name on the passengers ID with the name on the boarding pass. No wonder Pre-check lines are faster- they just wave anyone through.

SSSS for Some Reason said...

Anonymous said.... "You only allowed for 73 million travelers but TSA stated it was 173 million from June through August. Looks like you need to add a 100 million people to your numbers."

................

Quite right, my bad.

ONE HUNDRED and Seventy-Three million times 7 minutes per passenger, carry the two, convert to days.....

Works out to 2,034 years of People Time spent in the screening process.

Again, this doesn't count the time spent in line, or in 'enhanced screening areas' or in the time spent trying to screen passengers at their destination or in time spent testing bottles of water purchased in the 'sterile area.'

RB said...

SSSS for Some Reason said...
Anonymous said.... "You only allowed

Quite right, my bad.

ONE HUNDRED and Seventy-Three million times 7 minutes per passenger, carry the two, convert to days.....

Works out to 2,034 years of People Time spent in the screening process.

Again, this doesn't count the time spent in line, or in 'enhanced screening areas' or in the time spent trying to screen passengers at their destination or in time spent testing bottles of water purchased in the 'sterile area.'

September 18, 2014 at 9:21 AM
..............
And do keep in mind that this 2,034 man years only represents one quarter of a year.

6,102 Man Years wasted by TSA on screening people.

With all of that wasted time one would think TSA could find a few hours to screen airport workers, the people who present the greater risk to the transportation system.

Susan Richart said...

I found this interesting comment at FlyerTalk:

http://www.flyertalk.com/forum/23549317-post30.html

which I presume means that the TSA has granted PreCheck to some nefarious characters and is now worried about those characters and suicide vests. Therefore, an increase in the use of nude body scanners at PreCheck checkpoints.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Anonymous said...

"Well, we’re providing the most efficient security in the most effective way possible."

What happens if we try for the most effective security in the most efficient way possible? Might that be the better goal?

I continue to request that TSA share reviewable cost-benefit assessments for its checkpoint procedures, including PreCheck and the body scanners.

Tung said...

My family got TSA Pre check and it is been very nice and fast. I love it

mini market said...

it's very amazing and fast

GSOLTSO said...

Katherine Dain sez - "My husband and I got our TSA Pre check and we love it. It's been very nice and fast."

We are happy that you are happy!

Adrian sez - "Every study I've read about has failed to find any correlation between passenger profiles and their risk."

I would be interested as to which studies you are mentioning, could you please include a link so I can read up on them?

Susan sez - "You'll notice, RB, that perhaps the best and most reliable level of security, Passengers, is last on the TSA's list. And how long did it take the TSA to even acknowledge that Passengers are an extremely important aspect of security?"

The passengers have been the (figuratively and literally) last line of defense in a threat situation for an aircraft since before I came to TSA, which is 10 years ago. I can't give you a specific date that TSA began to recognize passengers as the last line of defense, but it was at least as far back as February of 2005.

West
TSA Blog Team

Anonymous said...

Why is Precheck not the default level of screening for ALL passengers, instead of a perk doled out to the wealthy, elite, and lucky?

Would Precheck exist if your misbegotten joke of an agency hadn't made the idiotic decision to use slow, invasive, and dangerously untested naked body scanners and then implement them in the worst possible manner in 2010?

Susan Richart said...

West wrote: "The passengers have been the (figuratively and literally) last line of defense in a threat situation for an aircraft since before I came to TSA, which is 10 years ago. I can't give you a specific date that TSA began to recognize passengers as the last line of defense, but it was at least as far back as February of 2005."

That could be true but it wasn't until 2009 when Nappy was forced to admit that it was passengers who tackled the underwear bomber that, yes, indeed passengers are the last and best line of defense and that the other layers of security failed. (And as John Mueller pointed out they are FREE to the taxpayer.) Prior to that date, listing passengers in the layers of security was purely lip service.

screen shot