Friday, August 22, 2014

TSA Week in Review – 39 Loaded Firearms and Other Items of Note Discovered This Week


Loaded firearm discovered in carry-on bag at HOU.

46 Firearms Discovered This Week – Of the 46 firearms, 39 were loaded and nine had rounds chambered.

Artfully Concealed Prohibited Items – It’s important to examine your bags prior to traveling to ensure you are not carrying prohibited items. If a prohibited item is discovered in your bag or on your body, you could be cited and possibly arrested by local law enforcement. Here are a few examples from this week where prohibited items were found by our officers in strange places. 
  • A belt buckle knife was discovered at Saipan (GSN).
  • A comb knife was discovered in a carry-on bag at Albuquerque (ABQ).
  • One round of .25 caliber ammunition was detected concealed inside a walking cane at Norfolk (ORF).
  • A concealed razor blade was detected in a cell phone case at Dallas Fort Worth (DFW).

Belt buckle knife discovered at GSN. 
Inert Ordnance and Grenades etc. – We continue to find inert grenades and other weaponry on a weekly basis. Please keep in mind that if an item looks like a real bomb, grenade, mine, etc., it is prohibited. When these items are found at a checkpoint or in checked baggage, they can cause significant delays because the explosives detection professionals must resolve the alarm to determine the level of threat. Even if they are novelty items, you cannot bring them on a plane.  Read here on why inert items cause problems. 
  • Two inert/replica grenades were detected in carry-on bags this week at Phoenix (PHX) and San Francisco (SFO).
Replica grenade/hot sauce discovered at PHX
Miscellaneous Prohibited Items In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons and many other prohibited items too numerous to note.

Sword EWR, Throwing Stars (SJC), Throwing Knives (LGA)
Propane (SAN), Model Rocket Engine (ILG) - (Both discovered in carry-on bags)
Stun Guns –15 stun guns were discovered this week in carry-on bags around the nation: Two were discovered at Phoenix (PHX), and the remainder were discovered at Albuquerque (ABQ), Atlanta (ATL), Branson (BBG), Casper (CPR), Denver (DEN), Houston Intercontinental (IAH), Las Vegas (LAS), Memphis (MEM), Mesa Gateway (IWA), Orange County (SNA), Portland (PWM), Sacramento (SMF), San Diego (SAN), and San Francisco (SFO).
Airsoft Gun – An airsoft gun was discovered this week in a carry-on bag at the Seattle (SEA) airport. Airsoft guns are prohibited in carry-on bags, but allowed in checked baggage. Airsoft grenades are not permitted in checked or carry-on bags. Read this post for more information: TSA Travel Tips Tuesday: Traveling with Airsoft Guns

Undeclared Firearms and Ammunition – Six undeclared 9mm firearms and a .40 caliber firearm were discovered improperly packed in a checked bag at San Diego (SAN). There were also 15 empty magazines, 200 rounds of 9mm ammo, 100 rounds of .40 caliber ammo, and a mix of 30 loose rounds discovered in the bag. Firearms and ammunition can be transported in checked baggage as long as they are declared and properly packed. You can read more about the firearm packing guidelines at TSA.gov.

Undeclared Firearms In Checked Bag (SAN)
Loaded firearms discovered in carry-on bags: Top - Bottom / Left - Right: SAT, OKC, HOU, ATL, FLL, IND
*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates.

You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms. Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $7,500. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions, that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

If you haven’t seen it yet, make sure you check out our TSA Blog Year in Review for 2013. You can also check out 2011 & 2012 as well.

Follow @TSABlogTeam on Twitter and Instagram!


Reach out to the TSA Contact Center if you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer.

53 comments:

Anonymous said...

Wonder how many they missed. Scary!

Anonymous said...

Thanks guys, keep up the good work. I don't care what they say about TSA,you deserve the kind of respect and recognition accorded law enforcement officers in this country.

Susan Richart said...

I guess that once again we have to wait for the poor schmuck who draws weekend night duty to post comments to this thread and to update older threads.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

RB said...

Would the blog team please point out any items that would not have been found by baggage xray and metal detectors?

Just curious, what was the dollar value of the hand held metal detectors that TSA consigned to the trash heap?

Why can illegal aliens fly without ID but a citizen must prove identity to TSA?

Why aren't retired military not given PreCheck like other members of the countries military forces?

Why are so many TSA employees criminals?

Susan Richart said...

Somebody wrote: "you deserve the kind of respect and recognition accorded law enforcement officers in this country."

First of all, you apparently have fallen for the TSA's trick of dressing their screeners up to look like copys. TSA is NOT law enforcement.

Second, respect for real LE is dropping like a rock in this country, thanks to DHS and all the weapons of war they are giving to police departments.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

GSOLTSO said...

Anon sez - "Thanks guys, keep up the good work."

You are welcome, thanks for the kind words!

Susan sez - "I guess that once again we have to wait for the poor schmuck who draws weekend night duty to post comments to this thread and to update older threads."

One "Schmuck" online here, howdy!

West
TSA Blog Team

RB said...

West, I see that you replied to a poster at Flyer Talk and claim again that TSA allows medical nitroglycerin pills.

I have clearly pointed out that the TSA CAN I TAKE tool does not indicate that this item is good to go, that the results returned is different for other medicines, but you ignore information that doesn't fit with the outcome you want.

We know that medical nitro has not been allowed by some TSA screeners and that there is no recourse available to the traveler to contest the decision of TSA screeners illegally playing doctor except not flying.

You are putting out bad information on this matter and TSA should address this matter with clear direction to both the public and TSA employees.

Why won't TSA clear this issue up?

Anonymous said...

"Watch and learn more about TSA’s explosives training program."

Oooh, thank you, TSA! I've watched and learned. I feel so much safer now.

Anonymous said...

Always such Hostility, Susan and RB. Ya know, they may not catch everything, we hope they do, but they are doing a job, just like you and I (assuming you are employed). Imagine one oversight on your job having the potential to cost human lives. Imagine you are making this assessment in less than 10 seconds. They don't get "do overs" and second chances.
I don't fly "frequently" but I fly "enough". five or six times a year, perhaps. I don't give TSA agents a hard time, for long lines, sometimes being a bit grumpy, I try and be as pleasant and polite as possible. RB- If you are retired military, thanks for your service. Go pay the 80 bucks like everyone else. If you got to retire, you probably have a pension, which is more than the rest of us have, or will have.
As for my opinion... Assess the heaviest fines for anyone attempting to carry a gun, or other "concealed weapon" on board. frankly, I'd like to see their names and photos posted, public humility is grand punishment. No normal person would have a handgun in their carry on bag and "forget" it was there. And so many loaded with rounds chambered! & every single week. Thanks TSA Front line. keep it up. Keep us safe.

SSSS for Some Reason said...

Aaaaannnnddddddd.....

No terrorists found.

And by the way, other than some smoke and noise why would the model rocket engine be prohibited?

GSOLTSO said...

RB sez - "West, I see that you replied to a poster at Flyer Talk and claim again that TSA allows medical nitroglycerin pills."

I replied with the same information that I have replied with here, please see the "Can I take app" here. If you type in "nitro pills", it gives the following result:

"Search Results For:

nitro pills

Check or Carry-on
TSA allows larger amounts of medically necessary liquids, gels, and aerosols in reasonable quantities for your trip, but you must declare them to security officers at the checkpoint for inspection.
We recommend, but do not require, that your medications be labeled to facilitate the security process.

You may carry non-medically necessary liquids, gels and aerosols in your carry-on bags only if they adhere to the 3-1-1 rule: containers must be 3.4 ounces or less; stored in a 1 quart/liter zip-top bag; 1 zip-top bag per person. Larger amounts of non-medicinal liquids, gels, and aerosols must be placed in checked baggage.

Even if an item is generally permitted, it may be subject to additional screening or not allowed through the checkpoint if it triggers an alarm during the screening process, appears to have been tampered with, or poses other security concerns. The final decision rests with TSA on whether to allow any items on the plane."

Now the image does not transfer here, but it has a green bar across the top, that indicates that the item is allowed in carry-on or checked luggage. This is the same information I have posted here, there and many other forums online.

Anon sez - "Oooh, thank you, TSA! I've watched and learned. I feel so much safer now."

Glad we were able to help out!

SSSS sez - "And by the way, other than some smoke and noise why would the model rocket engine be prohibited?"

The contents of model rocket engines are highly flammable and have been prohibited since I can remember.

West
TSA Blog Team

Eastern Sunset said...

West, you once again did not address the issue of nitro pills.

Since your precious app and website does not specify nitro pills are allowed, and since the TSA lets their screeners (the lowest level employee) decide if they want to confiscate ANY life saving medicine, many people cannot safely travel in this country.

Why does the TSA refuse to put nitro pills specifically on the allowed list? It could keep a couple of uninformed screeners from thinking medicine is explosives.

And why did the TSA continue to let screeners to confiscate allowed and legal items? This had cost travelers millions of dollars over the years.

Susan Richart said...

An anonymous person wrote: "Always such Hostility, Susan and RB."

You're right that I'm hostile. The TSA is probably one of the most dishonest government agencies this country has ever had to suffer through. The agency or perhaps I should say its administrator, John Pistole, defies orders of the court and ignores Acts of Congress.

There was an NPRM concerning the use of whole body scanners by the TSA. Over 5,000 comments were submitted to the Federal Register on the subject.

The TSA still has not responded to this NPRM, even though it has been over a year since comments were closed.

In effect, TSA is thumbing its nose at the public and at the Federal Rule Making procedure.

Yes, I'm hostile.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Jim B. said...

To the folks that complain about TSA constantly, get a life. Generally what I have found is that individuals that know absolutely nothing about the agency make a lot of useless noise. Just be thankful that you arrive safely every single time you travel by air.

RB said...

GSOLTSO said...
RB sez - "West, I see that you replied to a poster at Flyer Talk and claim again that TSA allows medical nitroglycerin pills."

I replied with the same information that I have replied with here, please see the "Can I take app" here. If you type in "nitro pills", it gives the following result:

"Search Results For:

nitro pills

Check or Carry-on
TSA allows larger amounts of medically necessary liquids, gels, and aerosols in reasonable quantities for your trip, but you must declare them to security officers at the checkpoint for inspection.
We recommend, but do not require, that your medications be labeled to facilitate the security process.

You may carry non-medically necessary liquids, gels and aerosols in your carry-on bags only if they adhere to the 3-1-1 rule: containers must be 3.4 ounces or less; stored in a 1 quart/liter zip-top bag; 1 zip-top bag per person. Larger amounts of non-medicinal liquids, gels, and aerosols must be placed in checked baggage.

Even if an item is generally permitted, it may be subject to additional screening or not allowed through the checkpoint if it triggers an alarm during the screening process, appears to have been tampered with, or poses other security concerns. The final decision rests with TSA on whether to allow any items on the plane."

Now the image does not transfer here, but it has a green bar across the top, that indicates that the item is allowed in carry-on or checked luggage. This is the same information I have posted here, there and many other forums online.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
And you continue to ignore the simple fact that nowhere in the information you provide does TSA ever say that "Nitrogylcerin Medicine" is allowed.

If have posted examples that demonstrate that difference and will do so again.
.......................
My TSA
HomeHome
Search Results For:
insulin

Check or Carry-on
Please notify the Transportation Security Officer that you have diabetes and are carrying your supplies with you. Insulin pumps and supplies must be accompanied by insulin, and insulin in any form or dispenser must be clearly identified.
TSA allows larger amounts of medically necessary liquids, gels, and aerosols in reasonable quantities for your trip, but you must declare them to security officers at the checkpoint for inspection.

The following diabetes-related supplies and equipment are allowed through the checkpoint once they have been screened:

Insulin and insulin loaded dispensing products: vials or box of individual vials, jet injectors, biojectors, epipens, infusers, and preloaded syringes.

Ice or ice packs to keep insulin cool.

Unlimited number of unused syringes when accompanied by insulin or other injectable medication.

Lancets, blood glucose meters, blood glucose meter test strips, alcohol swabs, and meter-testing solutions.

Insulin pump and insulin pump supplies: cleaning agents, batteries, plastic tubing, infusion kit, catheter, and needle.

Glucagon emergency kit.

Urine ketone test strips.

Unlimited number of used syringes when transported in Sharps disposal container or other similar hard-surface container.

Sharps disposal containers or similar hard-surface disposal container for storing used syringes and test strips.

Even if an item is generally permitted, it may be subject to additional screening or not allowed through the checkpoint if it triggers an alarm during the screening process, appears to have been tampered with, or poses other security concerns. The final decision rests with TSA on whether to allow any items on the plane.
.......................
If you can't see the difference between what you are providing and the query I have provided then there is no hope for this discussion moving forward.

So I ask, where does it say that medical nitroglycerin is permitted?

Where is the key that says the green bar means anything?

TSA seems unwilling to address a serious issue and provide a clear and concise response.

Why is that West?

RB said...

TSA screeners are not law enforcement.

They do try to appear as LEO's by wearing a uniform made up to look like cops and in my opinion that should be a violation of the law and subject any TSA employee dressed in that manner to arrests for impersonation of a Law Enforcement Officer.

RB said...

nonymous said...
Always such Hostility, Susan and RB. Ya know, they may not catch everything, we hope they do, but they are doing a job, just like you and I (assuming you are employed). Imagine one oversight on your job having the potential to cost human lives. Imagine you are making this assessment in less than 10 seconds. They don't get "do overs" and second chances.
I don't fly "frequently" but I fly "enough". five or six times a year, perhaps. I don't give TSA agents a hard time, for long lines, sometimes being a bit grumpy, I try and be as pleasant and polite as possible. RB- If you are retired military, thanks for your service. Go pay the 80 bucks like everyone else. If you got to retire, you probably have a pension, which is more than the rest of us have, or will have.
As for my opinion... Assess the heaviest fines for anyone attempting to carry a gun, or other "concealed weapon" on board. frankly, I'd like to see their names and photos posted, public humility is grand punishment. No normal person would have a handgun in their carry on bag and "forget" it was there. And so many loaded with rounds chambered! & every single week. Thanks TSA Front line. keep it up. Keep us safe.

August 24, 2014 at 6:29 PM

.................
Since you care calling me out directly ANON I have a question for you.

The last Red Team results available to the public showed that TSA missed 70% of target items and more recent information suggests they aren't doing any better today.

Should taxpayers be forced to pay for something that is only 30% accurate?

If your bank was only able to balance your bank account to a 30% accuracy standard would you be satisfied?

If the airline you fly,perhaps 5 or 6 times per year, only managed to land at the correct airport 30% of the time would you continue to fly that airline?

Do you really settle for sub par performance and call it good enough?

TSA does!

RB said...

Just noticed that on the TSA home page a large green bar at the top with an image of a pistol just below.

Based on information West has put out about Nitro pills I take it that pistols are also permitted.

SSSS for Some Reason said...

Anon said... "No normal person would have a handgun in their carry on bag and "forget" it was there."

So everyone who isn't you isn't normal?

Follow along as I tell you a little story....

I packed my little carry-on suitcase for a road trip. This suitcase has seen a lot of miles and is starting to show it, the lining isn't attached all the way around the inside, the lift-up handle doesn't lift up all the way anymore, basically this little guy has one, maybe two more trips before it just completely gives up.

Like I said, I packed it for a road trip. One of the things I packed was a pocket knife that was going to stay at the other end of the trip. Its a little thing, two inch blade on a three inch handle but for some reason is considered more dangerous because it is a lock-back, but whatever... I am driving.

During the trip the knife managed to find its way under the lining so when I got to the other end of the trip I 'lost' the knife. I use the quotes because I remembered packing it, but didn't find it when unpacking, assumed I dropped it somewhere along the way when I was digging in the bag to find something else.

Jump forward six months and I am packing the same tired bag for its last journey, this time by plane.

The not-so nice TSA Agent flagged my bag for extra screening, the other still not-so-nice TSA Agent took my bag over there to show me on the scanner what caused the flag.... looked like a jackson pollak to me with the colors everywhere, but it was a big deal to them. The Agent then opened the bag, reached inside, fished around for a moment and pulled out the pocket knife.

I forgot I had ever packed that knife in that bag because I assumed six moths earlier that I had lost it. And since it only cost a couple of bucks in the first place it wasn't one of those things you wonder about for more than a few minutes after its loss.

The not-so-nice Agent gave me two choices, surrender the item, or return to some place outside of security where I could mail it to myself. I had already stood in line for an hour and a half to get to this point in line and the security line was getting longer, not shorter so I surrendered the pocket knife.

I never saw that knife in any of these blotter posts so I am assuming it wound up in the surplus auction bin, or one of the not-so-nice but not-quite-rude Agents now has a nice little pocket knife.

I am not claiming I am normal, I am merely pointing out that your arrogant point of view that people should be publicly humiliated because they forgot something is exactly that... arrogant. When it is perfectly legal to carry a firearm, or knife, or cane, or any other thing everywhere else in ones life it is pretty easy to 'forget' that the TSA has a special zone where things that are legal everywhere else aren't legal here.

Anonymous said...

SSSS sez - "And by the way, other than some smoke and noise why would the model rocket engine be prohibited?"

The contents of model rocket engines are highly flammable and have been prohibited since I can remember.

West
TSA Blog Team

I guess I have more time to remember than you do because I remember being a kid and carrying a little special suitcase with my model rockets, including the engines, on the airplane with me to go see the grandparents. I even remember the Stewardess making a big deal out of putting my little case in the overhead bin very carefully so she didn't damage the rockets inside the case.

Having said that..... yes, I know the stuff in those things is highly flammable. D'uh, they are rocket engines. But ONE engine? Like I said, other than some smoke and some noise what is the risk to aviation?

GSOLTSO said...

RB sez - "Just noticed that on the TSA home page a large green bar at the top with an image of a pistol just below.

Based on information West has put out about Nitro pills I take it that pistols are also permitted."

Which TSA homepage? The main TSA.gov homepage is all blue in varying shades and with some other accent colors and photos. If you are talking about the blog here, that is the title bar, not the go/no-go bar on the "Can I take" app (There is a noticeable difference).

Pistols are allowed, as long as they are packed correctly, declared and sent in checked baggage, not carry-on baggage.

West
TSA Blog Team

RB said...

GSOLTSO said...
RB sez - "Just noticed that on the TSA home page a large green bar at the top with an image of a pistol just below.

Based on information West has put out about Nitro pills I take it that pistols are also permitted."

Which TSA homepage? The main TSA.gov homepage is all blue in varying shades and with some other accent colors and photos. If you are talking about the blog here, that is the title bar, not the go/no-go bar on the "Can I take" app (There is a noticeable difference).

Pistols are allowed, as long as they are packed correctly, declared and sent in checked baggage, not carry-on baggage.

West
TSA Blog Team

August 25, 2014 at 12:44 PM
..............
Since you chose to not post, or even discuss the info I submitted which shows allowed medicines on the TSA "Can I Take" tool returns a positive, clear, and in writing statement saying that item is allowed I see no recourse but trying to get the media involved in this discussion.

TSA is putting travelers at risk of death by confiscating medical nitroglycerin.

That is not the case with medical nitroglycerin. Period...All Stop.

You refuse to acknowledge that the tool does not state what you claim even up to the point of not allowing a comment that proves TSA is avoiding this matter.

Please show me the key that says a green bar means that I can take an item.

Anonymous said...

"Imagine one oversight on your job having the potential to cost human lives."

So you are equating a TSA screener to, say, an air traffic controller. I'm sorry, but the disaster potential of an oversight in those jobs is not at all equivalent. TSA misses 70% according to the last published test date. Can you imagine an air traffic controller with such a record?

Heck, I could fail to use a turn signal on my car and cause loss of life. Driving is far more dangerous than flying. Imagine one oversight while driving a car having the potential to cost human lives.

Here's an experiment for you:

Go look up the relative risks of Americans dying in a terror incident vs. dying in an auto crash and tell me that spending $8 billion/year on the TSA is the approach that saves the most lives.

"Go pay the 80 bucks like everyone else."

First, it's not "everybody else." Such an exaggeration is a poor basis for an argument.

Second, where exactly is the analysis that shows that the PreCheck program reduces the risk of a terror event? If TSA doesn't have it, or TSA hasn't shared it so that it can be reviewed by independent parties, what exactly are you paying for? The assurances of a stranger with unknown qualifications to make such a call? You might as well pay me $80 because, hey, I assure you I am a competent security professional and I would never waste your money.

"As for my opinion... Assess the heaviest fines for anyone attempting to carry a gun, or other "concealed weapon" on board."

Do you include snow globes and large bottles of water in the list of "concealed weapons"? TSA has decided that those are Dangerous Items, even though they do not trumpet the confiscation of such items on this blog.

[screenshot]

Susan Richart said...

"Jim B. said...

To the folks that complain about TSA constantly, get a life. Generally what I have found is that individuals that know absolutely nothing about the agency make a lot of useless noise. Just be thankful that you arrive safely every single time you travel by air."

You might find this interesting:

http://www.flyertalk.com/forum/23078568-post66.html

The TSA has a lousy reputation inside the Beltway and has just about become the laughing stock of the federal government.

screen shot

Eastern Sunset said...

West, obviously you are not the person to ask about updating TSA policy to force TSA employees to not confiscate life saving medicine, such as nitro pills. Can you get someone with actual authority to respond to our questions?

Can we contact a real human by name, not a generic email box that is ignored and allows TSA employees to hide from the flying public?

It's simple. Nitro pills are not a threat. Nitro pills are needed for the health or life of some people who fly. Some screeners are afraid of the word "nitro." All screeners, often backed up by their supervisors, can confiscate any piece of private property they want.

Training screeners not to fear nitro pills and forbidding them from confiscating life-saving medicine will allow flyers with heart conditions their Constitutional and legal rights to travel in this country and pursue life, liberty, and happiness.

Anonymous said...

I have no complaints about what they find versus what they don't, it is what it is. I do have a problem with my Pre-check becoming Random all of a sudden and being shook down for 85 dollars. I go through security about 80 times a year and think I should get a break.

Wintermute said...

Jim B. said...

"To the folks that complain about TSA constantly, get a life. "

I have one, thanks (BTW, why was this comment approved? That portion violates posted guidelines.)

"Generally what I have found is that individuals that know absolutely nothing about the agency make a lot of useless noise."

Don't listen to us. We know nothing (eye roll)... But listen to Bruce Schneier. I'm somewhat of a security expert, but I know next to nothing next to him.

"Just be thankful that you arrive safely every single time you travel by air."

Nevermind the sexual assault that you had to endure to do so.

West said...

"I replied with the same information that I have replied with here, please see the "Can I take app" here. If you type in "nitro pills", it gives the following result:"

West, I normally find you to be fairly reasonable in your replies (when we get one), but on this one you're entirely missing what RB is saying. He's saying the response by your precious app doesn't match the question. On other items, the response clearly lists the item questioned within it. For this particular item, the app does not.

Susan Richart said...

West either just cannot admit that he was wrong or he just doesn't understand what RB is saying.

To go over it once again:

When one types "nitroglycerin pills" or "heart medication" in the "can I take" app, one gets this result:

http://apps.tsa.dhs.gov/mytsa/cib_results.aspx?search=nitroglycerin%20pills

or this one

http://apps.tsa.dhs.gov/mytsa/cib_results.aspx?src=tsawebsite

When one types in the word "insulin", this is the result:

http://apps.tsa.dhs.gov/mytsa/cib_results.aspx?src=tsawebsite

Typing in the words: "glyceryl trinitrate" brings this result:

http://apps.tsa.dhs.gov/mytsa/cib_results.aspx?src=tsawebsite

"Glyceryl trinitrate" which is the chemical name for nitroglycerin.

Neither URL 1 or 2 addresses the queried words, while URL 3, relating to insulin, does.

URL 3 says it can't find that term.

So, folks who need nitro pills, just ask your MD and pharmacist to package them as "glyceryl tinitrate" and you shouldn't have any problem with the TSA 'cause it can't recognize the name.

The fatal flaw, of course, is the final line in the first 3 URLs which states:

"The final decision rests with TSA on whether to allow any items on the plane."

The TSA should not be allowed to deny any passenger his or her medication unless for some truly bizarre reason the screening of that medication rings an alarm. Even then it shouldn't be denied unless a more thorough search gives a further reason.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

GSOLTSO said...

Wintermute sez - "West, I normally find you to be fairly reasonable in your replies (when we get one), but on this one you're entirely missing what RB is saying."

Susan sez - "West either just cannot admit that he was wrong or he just doesn't understand what RB is saying."

It is not that I misunderstand what RB is saying, it is that I responded to a directed comment with the information I have available. While this information is not exactly what some of our commenters it is the only information that I have to post. If more information becomes available, I promise you that I will update and post it here for you.

West
TSA Blog Team

Susan Richart said...

That should be "URL 4 can't find the term"

Jim B said...

Bruce Schneir is a self described "security expert", as well as self promoter! Next time you quote an individual, try to put some research into your sources. If you are using this individual as a credible source, any statements that you inject becomes invalid. Better luck next time. Furthermore, if you do not like the current security measures, fly private aviation or take Greyhound. Remember, flying is a priviledge and not a right. Many Americans want to arrive safely and it is worth the minor inconvenience. You are in the minority.

Anonymous said...

*sigh* The false assertion that flying is a "priviledge" [sic] by Jim B. So very, very sad he is willing to hand over rights to any government actor who says he'll keep Jim B. "safe."

You aren't any safer by being groped by the TSA. The chances are already practically zero that you'll be killed by a terrorist act on a plane. Add on top of that the TSA admitting in court documents that no terrorist group is trying to attack planes taking off from the US.

So making the false statement that flying is not a right upheld by the courts does nothing to bolster your incorrect claims that the TSA does anything to keep anyone at an airport safe.

Please explain how someone can take a Greyhound bus to Hawaii or the capital of Alaska or Europe or Asia or Africa.

Please explain how companies and individuals who know the TSA is simply a waste of tax dollars are not allowed to use commercial aviation for interstate or international business and must use much more expensive general aviation.

Please explain how Bruce Schneier does not have the necessary knowledge, experience or credibility - beyond your own bias - to be considered a security expert.

Please explain how promoting oneself makes one instantly not credible.

Susan Richart said...

Our friend Jim B wrote: "If you are using this individual as a credible source, any statements that you inject becomes invalid."

That's true for you because you choose not to accept what Mr. Schneier says.

Any security expert who does not have a tie to the TSA (and even some who do) believe what the TSA is doing is NOT providing security but is purely for show, to make the gullible believe they are safe.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Susan Richart said...

"It is not that I misunderstand what RB is saying, it is that I responded to a directed comment with the information I have available. While this information is not exactly what some of our commenters it is the only information that I have to post. If more information becomes available, I promise you that I will update and post it here for you."

The above from West.

Perhaps then, West, you should recuse yourself from attempting to answer questions regarding medications. Or even go out on a limb, come right out and state:

"The TSA will not respond to questions about nitroglycerin pills/heart medication in the clear manner that customers need to know for their health."

You might even go further out on that limb and say: "I apologize for that unwillingness on the part of this agency."

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Wintermute said...

Anonymous Jim B said...

Bruce Schneir is a self described "security expert", as well as self promoter!

Ask any security expert if Mr. Schneir is a security expert or not. As for self-promotion, it is irrelevant.

Remember, flying is a priviledge and not a right.

I suggest you research case law on the matter, as this statement is factually incorrect. Flying is a right according to SCOTUS.

Anonymous said...

"Remember, flying is a priviledge and not a right."

You should put some research into your sources. Check out the U.S. Code:

49 U.S. Code § 40103 - Sovereignty and use of airspace
...
(a) Sovereignty and Public Right of Transit.—
...
(2) A citizen of the United States has a public right of transit through the navigable airspace.


You are no Bruce Schneier.

Curious Aussie said...

And here I was thinking that Nitroglycerine was a "grandfathered" medical product, mainly classed as medicine due to the fact that it has been in use for so long that no one wanted to do the clinical trials. There are other products, newer medicines even, that do the same job (Vasodilation) in a more targeted manner. Whilst GTN is still an important treatment option, it is a preventative drug, more than a treatment for an angina attack. Is there any reason for more than three doses on a flight?

Susan Richart said...

"Is there any reason for more than three doses on a flight?"

Of course there is reason! The medicine is not just for the flight, it's for use at any time it is needed. If one is going on a 10 day vacation, one needs to have medication for the entire duration of the trip, not just the flight.

And don't suggest that the medication be packed in checked luggage because if nitro pills are too "dangerous" to be in your carry-one they are certainly too "dangerous" to be in checked baggage.

srceen shot/DHS OIG statement

RB said...

Susan Richart said...
"It is not that I misunderstand what RB is saying, it is that I responded to a directed comment with the information I have available. While this information is not exactly what some of our commenters it is the only information that I have to post. If more information becomes available, I promise you that I will update and post it here for you."

The above from West.

Perhaps then, West, you should recuse yourself from attempting to answer questions regarding medications. Or even go out on a limb, come right out and state:

"The TSA will not respond to questions about nitroglycerin pills/heart medication in the clear manner that customers need to know for their health."

You might even go further out on that limb and say: "I apologize for that unwillingness on the part of this agency."

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

August 26, 2014 at 6:20 PM

................
TSA won't take a position one way or the other. That way they can claim anything they want.

West has gone so far as to not post my comments on this topic in the last couple of days. I believe everything I have submitted has fully complied with the TSA posting guidelines, guidelines that I maintain are a Civil Rights violation in and of themselves.

One has to wonder why TSA, its Blog Team, and individual TSA workers can't simple say and PROVE that Nitroglycerin Medicine is an allowed item?

Wouldn't it be simpler and more efficient for everyone involved to know exactly what the TSA Rules were?

TSA proves day in and day out that they are not on the side of Freedom but on the side of Oppression.

Anonymous said...

Jim B. said...
To the folks that complain about TSA constantly, get a life. Generally what I have found is that individuals that know absolutely nothing about the agency make a lot of useless noise. Just be thankful that you arrive safely every single time you travel by air.

August 25, 2014 at 8:41 AM
--------------------------------
I am thankful, Jim. but I do not thank TSA, as their security theatre has nothing to do with making us safe (or even safer). it likely makes us less safe, as the billion$$ of dollars wasted on their stage show could be used to take action that matters.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
Wonder how many they missed. Scary!

August 22, 2014 at 8:01 PM
---------------------------------
about 70%, based on the most recetly publicly released results. they stopped releasing their test results years ago because they were embarrassed they did so poorly.

Anonymous said...

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense.

RB said...

Curious Aussie said...
And here I was thinking that Nitroglycerine was a "grandfathered" medical product, mainly classed as medicine due to the fact that it has been in use for so long that no one wanted to do the clinical trials. There are other products, newer medicines even, that do the same job (Vasodilation) in a more targeted manner. Whilst GTN is still an important treatment option, it is a preventative drug, more than a treatment for an angina attack. Is there any reason for more than three doses on a flight?

August 27, 2014 at 2:43 AM

.......................
Any reason for more than 3 doses?

When I travel it isn't just to hit an airport and get my ticket punched before returning home. I might stay in the area for two weeks or so.

I travel with enough medicine to meet my needs on that trip whether it is for one day, two days, or more.

Getting prescription medicines while on the road is possible but not without excessive cost and inconvenience. Besides, there is no security concern that would cause TSA to prohibit a persons legally prescribe medicines or over the counter medicines.

Yet TSA does just that.

Medicine is not a security risk!

If TSA wishes to make a case that medical nitroglycerin is a risk then perhaps they should consider what a person could do with a syringe full of insulin. Insulin can be deadly but TSA clearly allows people to travel with insulin.

TSA will not admit that the guidance it gives for Medical Nitroglycerin is either incomplete or just flat out wrong. Nor will the TSA employees involved in this discussion step up and offer suggestions to help get these shortcomings corrected or do anything themselves directly to correct this error.

And TSA wonders why the agency has such a negative reputation.




RB said...

Susan Richart said...
"Is there any reason for more than three doses on a flight?"

Of course there is reason! The medicine is not just for the flight, it's for use at any time it is needed. If one is going on a 10 day vacation, one needs to have medication for the entire duration of the trip, not just the flight.

And don't suggest that the medication be packed in checked luggage because if nitro pills are too "dangerous" to be in your carry-one they are certainly too "dangerous" to be in checked baggage.

srceen shot/DHS OIG statement

August 27, 2014 at 9:22 AM
...................
Putting any thing of value in a checked bag is just asking to have your things stolen. TSA has made it impossible to have truly secure checked bags, and the thieves who have access to your bags while out of your site will steal anything.

The security problems are not from outsiders but from the people we trust with our possessions.

Anonymous said...

Is there a reason that my post providing a reference US Code to show that flying is indeed a "right" has been censored?

Anonymous said...

"...Next time you quote an individual, try to put some research into your sources. ...Remember, flying is a priviledge and not a right...."

You should research what US Code says about the status of flying as a right. That is, US Code establishes that citizens have the right to travel by air.

"Many Americans want to arrive safely...."

I am going to go out on a limb and say that all Americans want to arrive safely at their destinations. Where is the proof that TSA makes air travel measurably safer? I keep asking TSA for cost-benefit assessments or other kinds of analysis, but it is never provided.

[screenshot in case the blog team thinks that my attempt to correct misinformation that others were allowed to post is somehow unacceptable]

Anonymous said...

Weird, Ross Feinstein, the TSA Press Secretary, stated clearly and specifically on flyertalk.com/forum that nitro pills are allowed.

Why don't you know this, West? You post regularly on flyertalk.com/forum. Why hasn't the TSA website and app been updated?

Anonymous said...

Every now and then I read some comments, and I am struck by how much some people just use this as a forum to whinge. I'm not sure if it's really worth it for TSA to bother with a comments section as it seems to detract from the purpose of sharing actual information.

Anonymous said...

West, where is my comment? It met blotter guidelines. It's been over three days, and you definitely have approved later comments.

Why are you censoring the American public?

GSOLTSO said...

Anon sez - "Why don't you know this, West? You post regularly on flyertalk.com/forum. Why hasn't the TSA website and app been updated?"

I actually do know that Ross posted some info on FT - (I also know that FT is a private site, and when I post information baout TSA regulations, I try to use TSA operated sites. As for why the site has not been updated/changed, I am not involved in that process, so I can not comment on it.

West
TSA Blog Team

Anonymous said...

Can't or won't comment on the lack of website/app updates about nitro pills, West? If won't, why not?

If can't, get someone who can to post here. Does all if of the TSA hate the public so much? Don't you TSA employees talk to each other? Can't you or your bosses get a blotter teamer, the web guys, and legal in a room or conference call for 30 minutes?

Who is the person at TSA that can make this happen? Ross? His boss? How far up the chain do we have to go to get a simple update made?

What kind of place is this? Don't bother answering this last question. We all know the answer.

RB said...

GSOLTSO said...Anon sez - "Why don't you know this, West? You post regularly on flyertalk.com/forum. Why hasn't the TSA website and app been updated?"


I actually do know that Ross posted some info on FT - (I also know that FT is a private site, and when I post information baout TSA regulations, I try to use TSA operated sites. As for why the site has not been updated/changed, I am not involved in that process, so I can not comment on it.WestTSA Blog TeamAugust 31, 2014 at 6:56 AM
...................
Who is involved in updating or changing these resources? I would be happy to address the questions with them directly.

RB said...

Anonymous said...West, where is my comment? It met blotter guidelines. It's been over three days, and you definitely have approved later comments.Why are you censoring the American public?August 29, 2014 at 7:55 AM
................................

TSA has made it clear that they are not bound by the United States Constitution, Bill of Rights, or any other document supposedly protecting citizens rights.

Your civil rights mean nothing to TSA and its employees.