Friday, August 29, 2014

TSA Week in Review - 33 Loaded Firearms, Stun Grenade, and More


Loaded firearm discovered in carry-on bag at AUS.
42 Firearms Discovered This Week – Of the 42 firearms, 33 were loaded and nine had rounds chambered. 

Artfully Concealed Prohibited Items – It’s important to examine your bags prior to traveling to ensure you are not carrying prohibited items. If a prohibited item is discovered in your bag or on your body, you could be cited and possibly arrested by local law enforcement. Here are a few examples from this week where prohibited items were found by our officers in strange places. 
  • A double edged belt buckle knife was discovered at Kansas City (MCI).
  • A kitchen knife was discovered in the lining of a carry-on bag at Houston Intercontinental (IAH).
  • A belt buckle knife was discovered at Los Angeles (LAX).
  •  A cane sword and nunchucks (with an attached blade) were discovered in a carry-on bag at LasVegas (LAS).
(L-R) Cane Sword and Nunchucks (LAS), Belt Buckle Knives (LAX - MCI)
Inert Ordnance and Grenades etc. – We continue to find inert grenades and other weaponry on a weekly basis. Please keep in mind that if an item looks like a real bomb, grenade, mine, etc., it is prohibited. When these items are found at a checkpoint or in checked baggage, they can cause significant delays because the explosives detection professionals must resolve the alarm to determine the level of threat. Even if they are novelty items, you cannot bring them on a plane.  Read here on why inert items cause problems.
  • An Airsoft grenade was discovered in a carry-on bag at Phoenix (PHX).
  • An inert replica grenade was discovered in carry-on bag at Pittsburgh (PIT).
  • A black novelty bomb was detected in a carry-on bag at Milwaukee (MKE).
  • A live stun grenade was discovered in checked baggage at Evansville (EVV).
(L-R) Live Stun Grenade (EVV), F Bomb (MKE), Replica Grenade (PIT)
Miscellaneous Prohibited Items In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons and many other prohibited items too numerous to note.

Trench Knife (MSP), Batarangs (ORD), 3 Throwing Knives (RIC), Throwing Knife (SLC), Cat Eyes (PBI), Knuckle Duster Knife (LAS), Dagger (DTW)
Stun Guns –Seven stun guns were discovered this week in carry-on bags around the nation: Two were discovered at Phoenix (PHX), and the remainder were discovered at Dallas Love (DAL), Denver (DEN), Sacramento (SMF), San Diego (SAN), and St. Louis (STL).
(L-R) Airsoft guns discovered at LAS & SMF

Airsoft Guns – Three airsoft guns were discovered this week in carry-on bags. Two were discovered at Las Vegas (LAS), and one was discovered at Sacramento (SMF). Airsoft guns are prohibited in carry-on bags, but allowed in checked baggage. Airsoft grenades are not permitted in checked or carry-on bags. Read this post for more information: TSA Travel Tips Tuesday: Traveling with Airsoft Guns

Ammunition – When packed properly, ammunition can be transported in your checked baggage, but it is never permissible to pack ammo in your carry-on bag.

(L-R) Ammunition discovered in carry-on bags at IAH & MDW
Clockwise from top left: Firearms discovered at HOU, LAN, BTR, AUS, PWM, PHX, ATL

42 Firearms Discovered This Week – Of the 42 firearms, 33 were loaded and nine had rounds chambered. *In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates.

You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms. Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $7,500. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions, that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

If you haven’t seen it yet, make sure you check out our TSA Blog Year in Review for 2013. You can also check out 2011 & 2012 as well.

Follow @TSABlogTeam on Twitter and Instagram!


If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact us by clicking here.

56 comments:

Bill Craig said...

Unbelievable! That's not to say I don't believe this, just that I am astounded.

If only 1 of those guns, loaded, round in chambers got missed, and that person has ill intent .......

Once the weapons are confiscated from a person, he gets put on a "watch list", is this correct, Bob?

Thanks for keeping us - the travelers - safe, Bob!

RB said...

How secure is that BDO job West?

Anonymous said...

It never seems to amaze how many stupid there are.

Clint said...

West, are you the only one allowed to approve comments for this blotter? If there's a blotter "team," why does it take three days or more for comments to appear, even allowing for weekends and holidays?

Who specifically on the blotter "team" is responsible for approving comments? Who specifically is responsible for deleting and censoring comments?

When comments are unnecessarily deleted and the American public's comments are censored on this government website, who specifically manages the blotter team and who specifically is that manager's boss?

Who specifically is the head of the blotter team's department? In fact, what department or group or overall section of the TSA is the blotter team in?

For you, West, is it a dotted line management because you also work in an airport?

Ultimately, who specifically is responsible for this disaster of a blotter? The American people need to be talking directly to him or her, because our messages are not getting passed up to him or her by the blotter team. Or, the unfortunate opposite - he or she knows exactly how bad this blotter is and it fulfills some lame personal or TSA agenda.


*screenshot taken and timer set*

Anonymous said...

Hey, West, been down-graded yet? :-)

RB said...

Why no mention of TSA's BDO program elimination at 35 airports?

That certainly seems worthy of communicating to the public of all things TSA related.

GSOLTSO said...

Rb sez - "How secure is that BDO job West?"

Your concern is overwhelming RB, I am very secure in my position - thank you for asking!

Anon sez - " Hey, West, been down-graded yet? :-)"

Anon, your concern is also overwhelming, I am fine - thanks for asking.

West
TSA Blog Team

Susan Richart said...

@Bill Craig

Perhaps you are new to this blog and have not read through years of comments concerning the "miss" rate of the TSA, which was reported to be at 70% in 2010.

The fact that the TSA has not allowed the release of stats concerning the fail rate of Red Team tests for many years now, says it all: the rate has not improved.

Since the release of that information, we know that someone took a block of C4 through a checkpoint, the TSA in Newark missed "explosives" on a Red Team member, a passenger got through JFK with a stun gun in his carry-on. The list goes on and on. We are hearing about just the tip of the iceberg.

http://tinyurl.com/9ez86qk

Please don't be suckered in by the TSA's propaganda.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Clint said...

No answer to any of my previous comment's questions, West. Are you going to answer?

RB said...

GSOLTSO said...Rb sez - "How secure is that BDO job West?"

Your concern is overwhelming RB, I am very secure in my position - thank you for asking!

Anon sez - " Hey, West, been down-graded yet? :-)"

Anon, your concern is also overwhelming, I am fine - thanks for asking.

West TSA Blog Team August 31, 2014 at 7:02 AM
...............................
Thanks West, you know that the public is interested in the well being of all our federal employees. But what does it say of TSA's confidence in the BDO program while cutting the program at 35 airports?

West, how long before the public gets a definitive answer on the question if medical nitro is allowed or not? I think you have to agree that the TSA "Can I Take" tool does not answer the question.

RB said...

 Clint said...No answer to any of my previous comment's questions, West. Are you going to answer?August 31, 2014 at 7:59 AM

............
Consider yourself special if they do answer.

GSOLTSO said...

Rb sez - "West, how long before the public gets a definitive answer on the question if medical nitro is allowed or not? I think you have to agree that the TSA "Can I Take" tool does not answer the question."

I will post this again, and explain it is the only answer or information I can give you about Nitro is - the TSA "Can I Take" app, indicates that nitro pills and patches are allowed in both carry-on, and checked baggage. You can find the "Can I Take" app on this page.

West
TSA Blog Team

RB said...

GSOLTSO said...Rb sez - "West, how long before the public gets a definitive answer on the question if medical nitro is allowed or not? I think you have to agree that the TSA "Can I Take" tool does not answer the question."


I will post this again, and explain it is the only answer or information I can give you about Nitro is - the TSA "Can I Take" app, indicates that nitro pills and patches are allowed in both carry-on, and checked baggage. You can find the "Can I Take" app on this page.WestTSA Blog TeamAugust 31, 2014 at 11:09 AM
*********************************
And as I have demonsrtated the medical nitro question is not answered by the "Can I Take Tool"!

When submitting a query for medical nitro the response deals with LGA's. I don't understand why you refuse to acknowledge that fact, nor why you will not answer who maintains, creates, and approves the information on the "Can I Take"tool.

I am willing to do what it takes to get a useful, responsive answer to this question and so far TSA is stonewalling every step of the way. One could get the impression that TSA is hiding something.

Lisa Simeone said...

GSOLTSO said...
Rb sez - "West, how long before the public gets a definitive answer on the question if medical nitro is allowed or not? I think you have to agree that the TSA "Can I Take" tool does not answer the question."

I will post this again, and explain it is the only answer or information I can give you about Nitro is - the TSA "Can I Take" app, indicates that nitro pills and patches are allowed in both carry-on, and checked baggage. You can find the "Can I Take" app on this page.
West
TSA Blog Team
August 31, 2014 at 11:09 AM


Still doesnt't answer the question and you know it. Nitroglycerin is not listed anywhere on that page or via the "Can I Take" app. We've been over this a hundred times. But if this comment sees the light of day it'll be a miracle, since 90% of my attempted comments here never appear.

You guys are cowards. I'm not, since I use my real name every time I comment anywhere in the blabbosphere. And just so the other other Lisa Simeones in the country don't get in trouble, I'm the one in Baltimore.

Clint said...

West, why can't or won't you get someone on this blotter who CAN give us a definitive answer about nitro pills? If you are not allowed to give a real answer, who at TSA can do it?

SSSS for Some Reason said...

Bill Craig said..."If only 1 of those guns, loaded, round in chambers got missed, and that person has ill intent ......."

IF.

Considering how many items do get missed by the TSA the fact that an airplane hasn't had issues with one of those guns, loaded, round in chambers shows how few persons have ill intent regarding civil aviation.

Yes, guns are a prohibited item. Yes, they have been prohibited for years. No, having a gun does not make you a bad guy. No, having a gun in your carry on bag does not make you a terrorist.

You, just like the TSA, have an overly simplistic view of the traveling public.

Anonymous said...

Question

If I want to carry on my headband that has cat ears (not sharp - rounded tips) will that possibly be confiscated?

Wintermute said...

Blogger GSOLTSO said...
Rb sez - "West, how long before the public gets a definitive answer on the question if medical nitro is allowed or not? I think you have to agree that the TSA "Can I Take" tool does not answer the question."

I will post this again, and explain it is the only answer or information I can give you about Nitro is - the TSA "Can I Take" app, indicates that nitro pills and patches are allowed in both carry-on, and checked baggage. You can find the "Can I Take" app on this page.


West, that does not answer the question. We realize it may be the only answer you have, but if you cannot answer any better, please pass the concern up the chain to see if someone above cares enough about the flying public to actually fix the situation.

Susan Richart said...

West, the response one gets when querying "nitro pills" in the Can I Bring....." app says:

"TSA allows larger amounts of medically necessary liquids, gels, and aerosols in reasonable quantities for your trip, but you must declare them to security officers at the checkpoint for inspection."

Nitro pills are NOT LGAs.

The response goes on to indicate that LGAs may be taken on board in your carry-on bag.

Again, nitro pills are NOT LGAs.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Susan Richart said...

P.S., West, it the "Can I Bring...." app, not "Can I Take...."

Anonymous said...

I note that the Blog "Team" is now down to 3 players. Why is that? Have the other bloggers just given it up as being hopeless and a waste of time and effort?

RB said...

Bill Craig said...Unbelievable! That's not to say I don't believe this, just that I am astounded.If only 1 of those guns, loaded, round in chambers got missed, and that person has ill intent .......Once the weapons are confiscated from a person, he gets put on a "watch list", is this correct, Bob?Thanks for keeping us - the travelers - safe, Bob!August 29, 2014 at 8:50 PM
______________________________
Is TSA really keeping us safe? I think that is a legitimate question. So lets us review what we know.

We know that TSA brags about every little thing they do as long as it's favorable to the TSA message.

We know now that the Backscatter WBI have serious shortcomings, none of which were disclosed by TSA. In fact TSA lied about the capabilities of these machines.

We know that the last published Red Team test results showed a 70% failure rate.

We know that during Congressional hearings that TSA screening failures rates were stated to be off the charts.

We know that an armed TSA Red Team member evaded detection at DFW on every attempt. DFW uses MMW WBI, same as what is being used across the country today. (search: Armed TSA Agent Slips Past DFW Body Scanner)

We know that TSA hides results of current Red Team testing. For an agency that brags about everything else this is a strong indicator of continued poor results in this area.

I suggest that the only reason nothing bad has happened in flight is because no one is trying.

RB said...

Anonymous said...I note that the Blog "Team" is now down to 3 players. Why is that? Have the other bloggers just given it up as being hopeless and a waste of time and effort?September 1, 2014 at 10:13 AM
_________________________________
Only one of which responds to a few questions.

The other two must think they are too important to address mere commoners.

Anonymous said...

Clint,nitroglycerin pills can go as long as you have the script with you or something stating that they are prescribed. Easy enough.

Study after study has shown the BDO program to be ineffective.

Mostly everyone here complains about the TSA but yet to offer any real world solutions.

Russ Farble said...

I thought Bob was forbidden to comment by his bosses. People with his personality type wouldn't restrain themselves from commenting without fear of getting fired. Even then, people with Bob's personality type would comment anonymously.

Susan Richart said...

"Anonymous said...

Clint,nitroglycerin pills can go as long as you have the script with you or something stating that they are prescribed. Easy enough."

Nowhere does the TSA state that nitroglycerin pills can be taken on board with either a script or in the original dispensing bottle.

Try reading this link:

http://www.flyertalk.com/forum/22977669-post78.html


The problem here was that the screener read the word "nitroglycerin" on the prescription bottle and determined that the passenger could not take the pills. The screener's supervisors backed him up.

Then read this:

http://www.flyertalk.com/forum/23440827-post43.html

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Anonymous said...

Bill Craig said...
Unbelievable! That's not to say I don't believe this, just that I am astounded.

If only 1 of those guns, loaded, round in chambers got missed, and that person has ill intent .......

Once the weapons are confiscated from a person, he gets put on a "watch list", is this correct, Bob?

Thanks for keeping us - the travelers - safe, Bob!

August 29, 2014 at 8:50 PM
---------------------------------
what is unbelievable is that you still think that TSA's security theatre makes you safe. it does not. it is likewise unbelievable that you think it is OK to place a law-abiding citizen who is simply exercising a protected civil right (ok, 2 of them - travel and RKBA) to be placed on a watch list for doing so. pathetic. "if only 1 of those got missed" - latest red team results show that 7 are missed for every 3 found - and no sign of "ill intent" yet ...

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
Clint,nitroglycerin pills can go as long as you have the script with you or something stating that they are prescribed. Easy enough.

Study after study has shown the BDO program to be ineffective.

Mostly everyone here complains about the TSA but yet to offer any real world solutions.

September 1, 2014 at 5:56 PM
---------------------------------
TSAnon,
you clearly have not been paying attention, or are intentionally trying to muddy the waters on behalf of your TSA buddies. post after post has advocated a return to the pre-911 security standards, the abolition of the costly and wasteful TSA, and the elimination of expensive and ineffective forms of screening like the MMW and backscatter Xray machines. 911 didn't happen because the security was inadequate - it happened because the attackers expoited weaknesses in the mindset of the flight crews and public which have been extensively discussed in these posts. those flaws are corrected. TSA and its current secretive, suspect, expensive, and wasteful procedures are not making us safer, but are making us as a Nation poorer. enough already.

RB said...

 Anonymous said...

Clint,nitroglycerin pills can go as long as you have the script with you or something stating that they are prescribed. Easy enough.

Study after study has shown the BDO program to be ineffective. 

Mostly everyone here complains about the TSA but yet to offer any real world solutions.

September 1, 2014 at 5:56 PM
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
Why would anyone at TSA need to see a prescription? That is outside of the TSA mandate.

Surely you understand that nitroglycerin medicines are not explosive and cannot be converted to an explosive material.

This should be a non-issue except TSA seems incapable or unwilling to properly training and managing its workforce.

As long as TSA employees react to scary words and TSA refuses to educate its employees travelers will continue to face stupid actions by some TSA employees.

Anonymous said...

Susan, I take my pills everytime I fly. I have my script ready. Never had a problem. So I have no need to look at a blog. BTW has anyone thought of calling TSA cares for medical questions?

Anonymous said...

Here's a question, and no, since I'm not a cardiologist, I don't know the answer: if you have a heart condition that requires nitro tablets, should you really be flying on aircraft? Since you lose half the atmospheric pressure in the first eight thousand feet, and cabin altitudes can get that high, seems like an awful lot of stress on a weakened heart due to decrease in atmosphere oxygen content. That said, I thought he was clear enough about the tablets though.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
Clint,nitroglycerin pills can go as long as you have the script with you or something stating that they are prescribed. Easy enough.

Study after study has shown the BDO program to be ineffective.

Mostly everyone here complains about the TSA but yet to offer any real world solutions.


September 1, 2014 at 5:56 PM


Is it your suggestion to keep an expensive TSA program that does not work just because there is nothing suggested to replace it?

Plenty of suggestions have been put forth to improve airport security screening.

Return security responsibility to the owners of the property, just like every other business in the country. In this case the owners of the airplanes and airports.

Return screening methods to pre 9/11 methods. The only thing that went wrong on 9/11 was the government mandated screening standards. The government did not prohibit knives and other sharps.

Return Aviation Security matters to the FAA.

Reduce the newly reassigned FAA TSA agency to an oversight agency only.

Use invasive screening tools, such as WBI, as secondary screening means only.

Require that any screening method mandated by government is fully tested for effectiveness and reliability before a single tax dollar is spent by government.

Mandate that no hands on searches of travelers can occur without articulated probably cause.

Reassign the Air Marshals to the Justice department. Justice is the LEO portion of federal government and there is no reason to duplicate that effort (and cost) at TSA.

This just scratches the surface. TSA was the wrong solution to a country of free people and should be terminated today.

RB said...

Anonymous said...
Here's a question, and no, since I'm not a cardiologist, I don't know the answer: if you have a heart condition that requires nitro tablets, should you really be flying on aircraft? Since you lose half the atmospheric pressure in the first eight thousand feet, and cabin altitudes can get that high, seems like an awful lot of stress on a weakened heart due to decrease in atmosphere oxygen content. That said, I thought he was clear enough about the tablets though.

September 2, 2014 at 10:05 AM
..................
That's a fair question but let us believe that a traveler has cleared travel by air with their doctor before setting out.

What business of TSA's is it to question that persons medical needs or medicines?

Nitroglycerin pills, patches, ointment are not explosive, cannot be made into an explosive, and is really no concern of a TSA Limited Administrative Search for WEI.

TSA is exceeding their authority if a search extends into doing anything other than ensuring an items is not WEI.

Anonymous said...

"You guys are cowards. I'm not, since I use my real name every time I comment anywhere in the blabbosphere."

A. There is no substantive connection between one's cowardice and the use of one's real name in a blog reply. Your statement is ridiculous and self-serving. Using your real name here gives you no credibility whatsoever.

B. How does anybody here know Lisa Simeone is your real name anyway? My real name is Leon Erwin. I guess I am brave now.

Anonymous said...

Why do you use naked body scanners when the metal detector can find all of this stuff?

Lisa Simeone said...

Anonymous writes:
"Mostly everyone here complains about the TSA but yet to offer any real world solutions.
September 1, 2014 at 5:56 PM"


Bull. We've offered them dozens of times. But it doesn't help when comments get censored.

Anonymous said...

Another week, another total lack of anything found with your slow, invasive, and untested naked body scanners. Meanwhile, how many false positives did the naked body scanners produce, and how many people had to be groped by your screeners because you're using faulty technology that can't tell a pleat in a pair of pants from an explosive?

And why are Curtis Burns and West Cooper afraid to acknowledge, let alone answer, these questions?

Lisa Simeone said...

Anonymous said...
"You guys are cowards. I'm not, since I use my real name every time I comment anywhere in the blabbosphere."
A. There is no substantive connection between one's cowardice and the use of one's real name in a blog reply. Your statement is ridiculous and self-serving. Using your real name here gives you no credibility whatsoever.
B. How does anybody here know Lisa Simeone is your real name anyway? My real name is Leon Erwin. I guess I am brave now.
September 2, 2014 at 1:45 PM


1. Re cowards, I was addressing the TSA Blog writers and the TSA in general.

2. Re my identity, Google is your friend.

RB said...

I really don't understand why the "F" Bomb was confiscated.

http://www.uncommongoods.com/product/f-bomb-paperweight

After inspection it would be evident to any person of average intelligence that it was not a weapon of any kind.

How can anyone take TSA seriously if you people keep doing stupid stuff like this?

Anonymous said...

Why do you not answer ALL questions asked with a full answer and not a lot of nothing?

Peggy said...

What about when the baby is born and parents are told they have to be subjected to a physically invasive patdown to be "allowed" by the TSA to carry food or drink for their child?

July 23, 2014 at 2:59 PM

----

Why haven't you responded? Parents want to know.

August 7, 2014 at 6:45 pm
----

11 days later. Still waiting.
August 18, 2014 at 6:59 AM
----

10 days even later. Still waiting.
August 28, 2014 at 10:30 PM
----

I posted the question above and followed up three times on the Pregnant Women blotter post and was totally ignored. Please answer my question. I have been waiting six weeks.

Susan Richart said...

"I really don't understand why the "F" Bomb was confiscated."

RB, don't you know it could frighten passengers on the plane, you know, those who believe the TSA is keeping them safe.

Bob, West, anybody, were your "explosives detection professionals" called in to determine that the "F" bomb was not a threat?

When was the last time those "professionals" were called at any airport?

Suppose I'll get an answer?

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Anonymous said...

"Why do you not answer ALL questions asked with a full answer and not a lot of nothing?"

That's a very good question! Curtis Burns, West Cooper, could you address it, please?

Susan Richart said...

For Bill Craig, more info on missed weapons:

http://nypost.com/2013/03/14/newark-airport-security-failure-explained-away-by-tsa-blog/

"The TSA whined yesterday that it’s just too darn hard for agents to find bombs — unless the terrorists use explosives straight out of a Loony Tunes cartoon.

That was the agency’s sorry excuse to explain how Newark Airport screeners were completely outmatched by an undercover fed who stuffed an IED in his pants and slipped through two layers of security."

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Susan Richart said...

"Peggy said...

What about when the baby is born and parents are told they have to be subjected to a physically invasive patdown to be "allowed" by the TSA to carry food or drink for their child?....

I posted the question above and followed up three times on the Pregnant Women blotter post and was totally ignored. Please answer my question. I have been waiting six weeks."

Could it be, Peggy, that the TSA has no response to justify stupidity?

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Anonymous said...

My stars, looks like RB is correct in his assumption that the biggest threat to aircraft comes from inside the airport:

http://tinyurl.com/pyrt8lr

"An airport is probably the last place anyone would want a suspected terrorist to work, but before he died overseas, that's exactly what Abdirahmaan Muhumed did in the Twin Cities. In fact, he may have cleaned your plane at the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport. Muhumed was the second known Minnesotan killed while fighting for ISIS in Syria, and a Fox 9 exclusive uncovering his employment history is raising a few eyebrows."

screen shot

RB said...

Why TSA's BDO program has failed.

http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2013/11/despite-lack-of-science-tsa-spent-millions-on-behavioral-detection-officers/

"Unfortunately, according to the US government's internal watchdog agency, little real science stands behind the program. In a new report (PDF) released today, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) concluded that "the human ability to accurately identify deceptive behavior based on behavioral indicators is the same as or slightly better than chance." And it dryly noted that programs like SPOT should be "demonstrated to work reliably in their intended environment prior to program deployment.""

http://www.gao.gov/assets/660/658923.pdf

"TSA Should Limit Future Funding for
Behavior Detection Activities"

My question is why hasn't TSA terminated the BDO program across the board? Why does TSA continue to squander tax dollars on things that are known to be ineffective or just doesn't work?

Why is no one at TSA held accountable for spending money on efforts that do nothing to improve passenger safety when flying commercial aircraft?

It's time to assign a Special Prosecutor to investigate TSA's mismanagement of tax dollars!

Chris Bray said...

RB

About this: "After inspection it would be evident to any person of average intelligence that it was not a weapon of any kind."

The answer is in the phrase "person of average intelligence." This is a blog by and about TSA employees.

Rod Farva said...

I congratulate my brother and sister Officers at MKE on a good catch! Many naysayers might want to complain about the TSA protecting them from terrorism by confiscating a novelty paperweight, but the truth is that you can never be too careful. We are on the front lines in a war, and I am proud of the work we do.

Lisa Simeone said...

Rod Farva said...
I congratulate my brother and sister Officers at MKE on a good catch! Many naysayers might want to complain about the TSA protecting them from terrorism by confiscating a novelty paperweight, but the truth is that you can never be too careful. We are on the front lines in a war, and I am proud of the work we do.
September 4, 2014 at 10:24 PM


Surely this is sarcasm?

RB said...

Rod Farva said...I congratulate my brother and sister Officers at MKE on a good catch! Many naysayers might want to complain about the TSA protecting them from terrorism by confiscating a novelty paperweight, but the truth is that you can never be too careful. We are on the front lines in a war, and I am proud of the work we do.

September 4, 2014 at 10:24 PM
......................
I enjoy satire.

The "We are on the front lines in a war" line is just halarious.

Thanks for the laugh.

Anonymous said...

"1. Re cowards, I was addressing the TSA Blog writers and the TSA in general."

That does not make it an argument with merit. Given that many people comment on the blog anonymously, it's an argument that really only serves to undermine your credibility with blog readers when you post with your "real" name.

Why would I want to google your "real" name anyway? How does that verify your identity and give you credibility?

--Leon

Anonymous said...

Oh Rod, LOL, you almost caught us! I hope West and the blotter team catch on someday!

Anonymous said...

Try boarding a plan wearing an insulin pump. This medical device does not require a pat down but I am subjected to this much too often - even after meeting all the TSA regulations. Total BS!

Anonymous said...

"We are on the front lines in a war, and I am proud of the work we do."

The only war I see is the war on travelers, waged by the TSA. I am more afraid of harassment and molestation by mean TSA agents then I ever have been of "terrorists". I have only flown once to the USA since 2010, and only for the death of a family member.

The TSA are the real terrorists. They are the ones that scare me.

Anonymous said...

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense.