Tuesday, August 26, 2014

TSA Travel Tips: Labor Day & Back to School Travel



Labor Day is quickly approaching! It’s likely you are either off to school, taking an end of summer trip, or just plopping down on your couch and watching the tube. Whatever it is you’re doing, if you’re traveling by commercial aircraft, here are some tips and links to other posts that will help get you on your way.

Pack Smart: Pack smart and get through the line faster!

Double Check: If you’re grabbing a bag, suitcase, briefcase, jacket and other items you haven’t used in a while, be sure to give them the onceover so you don’t accidentally take something prohibited through the checkpoint. Many people who have brought guns, ammunition, knives, and other prohibited item say that they did so unknowingly.

Batteries – You can’t go anywhere without some kind of battery these days. Read this post to learn about what types of batteries you can travel with.

Foods: Cakes, pies, bread, donuts, turkeys, etc., are all permitted. Here is a list of items that should be placed in your checked bags or shipped: cranberry sauce, creamy dips and spreads (cheeses, peanut butter, etc.), gift baskets with liquid or gel food items (salsa, jams and salad dressings), gravy, jams, jellies, maple syrup, oils and vinegars, sauces, soups, wine, liquor and beer. 


Blades: Anything with blades should be placed in your checked baggage. This includes knives of all sizes, and blender and food processor blades. Nail clippers and corkscrews are permitted, but some have knife blades attached. This makes them prohibited.

Camping, Backpacking, or Fishing: If you’re heading to the great outdoors, be sure to check out this post for tips on traveling with camping and fishing gear.


Jewelry: Should you remove jewelry or keep it on to go through security? The answer, in most cases is that you can keep it on, but there are a few different choices that you can make based on what kind of jewelry it is. Read this post for more information. 

Lose Something? Find all of our lost & found contacts for each airport here.

Makeup: Any liquid makeup cosmetics such as eyeliner, nail polish, liquid foundation, etc., should be placed in the 3-1-1 bag. That goes for perfume as well. Powder makeup is fine.

Forgotten or Lost IDs: If you have lost or forgotten your ID, you will still be permitted to fly as long as you help us verify you are who you say you are by answering a few questions. Read this post for more information.

Medication: One of the more popular questions we get from travelers is: “Can I travel with my medication.” The answer is yes, with some qualifiers. Here are a few tips that you might find helpful.

Shaving Razors: You can get more info from our blog post on this subject where the pictures will answer your questions.

Sporting Goods: Golf clubs, baseball bats (including the mini slugger bats), cricket bats, bows and arrows, hockey sticks, scuba knives, spear guns, etc., are all prohibited from being carried onto the plane. However, you can place them in your checked baggage.

The MyTSA App: Want TSA information anywhere, anytime?  Use the MyTSA app. Among the great features, there’s a “Can I Bring My…” tool. Want to know if you can pack a certain item? This is the tool for you. Type in the name of the item you’re curious about and it tells you if the item is permitted or not, along with packing tips. This isn’t a Magic 8 Ball, so please don’t expect it to prophetically answer yes and no questions. A wait time feature is also available. It relies on crowd sourcing, which means the more people who use it, the better. 

Traveling With Children: Did you know that children 12 and under can keep their shoes on? If you’re going on a family trip this summer, be sure to click here for more tips. 

TSA Recognized Locks: Want to lock your checked baggage? Be sure to read this post first.

TSA Cares: Travelers or families of passengers with disabilities and medical conditions may call the TSA Cares helpline toll free at 1-855-787-2227 with any questions about screening policies, procedures and what to expect at the security checkpoint 72 hours prior to traveling. Injured service members and veterans including individuals associated with a wounded warrior program may contact TSA Cares to help facilitate the screening process.

Lastly, if you have any questions that aren’t covered here, please reach out to the TSA Contact Center. The hours are Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. – 11 p.m., Eastern Time; weekends and federal holidays, 9 a.m. – 8 p.m., Eastern Time. The TCC can be reached at 866-289-9673. Passengers can also reach out to the TSA Contact Center with questions about TSA procedures, upcoming travel or to provide feedback or voice concerns.  

Follow @TSABlogTeam on Twitter and Instagram!


Reach out to the TSA Contact Center if you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer.

21 comments:

RB said...

"Blades: Anything with blades should be placed in your checked baggage. This includes knives of all sizes, and blender and food processor blades. Nail clippers and corkscrews are permitted, but some have knife blades attached. This makes them prohibited."
???????????????????????????

Why does TSA allow sharp pointed scissors but not a small pen knife?

???????????????????????

Why can I take in 4 or 5 100 ml bottles of a liquid and an empty 500 ml bottle so I can pour all the smaller bottles into the big one once past TSA InSecurity but I can't take the larger bottle already filled?

?????????????????????????

Why can some people go through security without having to undress and take off their shoes but others must disrobe? How does TSA ensure the shoes that remain on peoples feet are safe?

?????????????????????????????

How many people have been fired from TSA this year for reasons of misconduct of any kind?

Susan Richart said...

http://blog.tsa.gov/2013/09/tsa-travel-tips-tuesday-traveling-with.html

"You can bring your medication in pill or solid form in unlimited amounts as long as it is screened."

As long, of course, as it's not nitroglycerin pills. Then it's a crap shoot as to whether or not you'll be able to keep those pills.

By the way, the page above does not say word one about the TSA screeners being able to confiscate your medication:

"Even if an item is generally permitted, it may be subject to additional screening or not allowed through the checkpoint if it triggers an alarm during the screening process, appears to have been tampered with, or poses other security concerns. The final decision rests with TSA on whether to allow any items on the plane."

What other security concerns can medication raise that can't be resolved so as to allow a passenger to take their meds with them?

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Anonymous said...

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense.

RB said...

Blog Team, who at TSA is responsible for the "TSA CAN I TAKE" tool and the information it returns on queries?

Since the Blog Team will not take any steps to assist in correcting, or clarifying, the information returned perhaps the Blog Team will man up and give the public the information needed to address the shortcomings of the tool.

SSSS for Some Reason said...

"... This includes knives of all sizes, and blender and food processor blades. "

That makes no sense. The blades on your typical blender are shorter, and less sharp, then a typical pair of scissors that ARE allowed in the cabin.


"...You can also bring beverages packaged in 3.4 oz or less bottles in your carry-on bags in the baggie."

This one is still my favorite. I can bring close to thirty ounces of liquid through security, but only as long as it is broken down into safe quantities of 3 ounces each. You never have been able to explain what makes 7 bottles of three ounces safe but one bottle of 16 ounces dangerous.

You aren't even trying anymore, are you TSA?

RB said...

SSSS for Some Reason said...
"... This includes knives of all sizes, and blender and food processor blades. "

That makes no sense. The blades on your typical blender are shorter, and less sharp, then a typical pair of scissors that ARE allowed in the cabin.


"...You can also bring beverages packaged in 3.4 oz or less bottles in your carry-on bags in the baggie."

This one is still my favorite. I can bring close to thirty ounces of liquid through security, but only as long as it is broken down into safe quantities of 3 ounces each. You never have been able to explain what makes 7 bottles of three ounces safe but one bottle of 16 ounces dangerous.

You aren't even trying anymore, are you TSA?

August 27, 2014 at 8:10 AM
.................
Yeah, TSA doesn't want to talk about that do they?

As pointed out anyone can take as many full 100 ml bottles that can be cram into a 1 quart zip lock and an empty container large enough to pour all of those little bottles into right through a TSA checkpoint with no problem.

You would think that the so called TSA Security Experts would have figured this out by now.

shoulda coulda woulda

Anonymous said...

Can someone from the TSA explain the logic behind the liquid restrictions? As others have mentioned, one large bottle is not permitted but several small bottles are permitted. The total volume is the same. The smaller bottles could be combined later anyway. This blog has even shown that liquids can be tested. Why not randomly test liquids at the checkpoint? It you want to limit total volume, that's fine, but why limit individual container sizes?

The liquid ban doesn't make me feel safer, especially when I see a trash can full of "dangerous" liquids sitting in a trash can next to the checkpoint. If you are going to force me to surrender a bottle of water because it could be dangerous, at least treat it like it could be dangerous.

Anonymous said...

https://grabien.com/story.php?id=13318

See what people are saying about TSA in the comments.

TSA should be proud.

Anonymous said...

Ignore the FDA "advice" to separate and declare prescription medication; the TSA has no authority to confiscate medication. If they try, summon law enforcement and consider referring charges for reckless endangerment.

RB said...

"Forgotten or Lost IDs: If you have lost or forgotten your ID, you will still be permitted to fly as long as you help us verify you are who you say you are by answering a few questions. Read this post for more information."
_________________________________

How can TSA verifiy the identity of an illegal alien? A person who illegally entered the country and has proven through action a disposition to violating the law?

RB said...

The TSA "Can I Take" tool doesn't not return useful information when queried about Medical Nitroglycerin.

TSA never gives a positive response and continues to use misleading statements trying to convince the public that it says something else.

How could it be in the best interest of TSA to deliver misinformation to the public?

How is it ethical to deliver misinformation to the public?

How can a TSA employee retain their job when they are not honest with the public?

SSSS for Some Reason said...

RB said...How could it be in the best interest of TSA to deliver misinformation to the public?

Because if they know the answer and we don't then they can claim they are needed to give the answer.

If they were to just answer the question you would have an answer and they would not be needed anymore.

Well, that would assume they were ever needed in the first place.

Seriously, TSA... when are you going to adopt the more sensible, and effective, model the FAA uses? They don't provide pilots or mechanics, only the standards. If you were to get out of the employment business and into the security business we could get around all these abuses of our rights AND make aviation even more secure than it already is.

Anonymous said...

Why are you shoving people in the precheck lane through the invasive and ineffective strip search scanners?

Is this going to be the new norm? Are you going to start removing the inexpensive and effective walk through metal detectors?

This is further proof that your propagandists who came up with the false phrase "trusted traveler" were lying. The TSA thinks everyone is a terrorist and is out to kill people on planes when the exact opposite is true.

Well, TSA blotter team: you don't trust the public? We don't trust you!

Anonymous said...

Why has my comment not been approved? It met this blog's comment policy.

Spartacus said...

You forgot to tell people that the US government demands flyers look a certain way and wear only TSA approved clothes to reduce, but not eliminate, the chance of having their breasts, buttocks, and genitals groped.

The TSA tells us what legal items we are "not allowed" to carry with us when we travel. The TSA blames and mistreats us if we don't pack the way they demand.

The TSA treats anyone wearing long hair, natural African-American hair, braids, buns, weaves, ponytails, etc. as terrorists and runs their dirty gloves through flyers' hair, spreading dirt, germs, and potentially lice.

The TSA treats many people who wear loose pants, cargo shorts, screen-printed shirts, suits, skirts, dresses, jackets, coats, hoodies, turbans, hats, kerchiefs, habits, yarmulkes, hijabs, decorated tops, decorated pants, rings, watches, necklaces, bracelets, earrings, body piercings, and body art as terrorists. The TSA uses technology that registers both false positives AND false negatives over 50% of the time as an excuse to grope breasts, buttocks, and genitals of men, women, and children.

The TSA treats anyone who has mobility issues, full-range motion issues, has a medical device, needs special food/drink, or carries medications as terrorists. They grope the breasts, buttocks, and genitals of people with medical issues and the elderly at such a high rate as to be discriminatory. The TSA confiscates medically necessary food, drink, and medication.

The TSA treats parents as terrorists. They grope parents' breasts, buttocks, and genitals for carrying baby food/drink. They open sealed baby food and drink, leading to spoilage and possible food poisoning of children. The TSA confiscates breast milk.

This. Must. Stop.

Screen shot taken and originally submitted on September 4, 2014 at 7:45 AM

Anonymous said...

I'm a 59 yr old Caucasian woman with 2 artificial hips. I have cards from both surgeons giving details of all parts that were installed; dates etc. yet again today I was traveling with my husband from Charleston SC to S. Bend IN. We were pre- checked but... Still I am
stopped, told to take off my flat v lightweight shoes, stand on some filthy Mat barefoot;remove a thin belt with a small metal clasp , and be patted down. I had slim fitting summer clothes- where am I supposed to be concealing all these hazardous weapons? This has happened dozens of times- is it not possible to be registered as having artificial joints and just get thru' security like everyone else??? I even had to submit to this when I was in a wheelchair having had major hip surgery 7 days earlier in Belgium and couldn't stand without crutches!Also, why is it Ok to pack as much liquid as you like in the hold- if that we're rigged to explode would it really matter whether it was in the hold or in the cabin? If small weapons are allowed why confiscate half a bottle of sunscreen, and an aerosol of insect repellant, which if it were deodorant apparently is OK? Totally non-sensical to me - a waste of workers time, TSA money and causes way too much customer aggravation. How many disasters if any have all these so called'precautions' ever averted? Explosives in the shoes was one case, but are all explosives detected by metal detectors- if indeed any? Flying is a huge pain these days! I'm all for taking realistically precautions, but please could TSA use some common sense ? !!!!!!!!!!

Anonymous said...

With the advanced technology of the 21 st century can the TSA not come up with a device for proving a bottle of water is JUST a bottle of water, and make up, sunscreen, baby drinks are JUST that? How exactly are the latter supposed to be hazardous- given the same volume can be carried thru security in numerous smaller bottles?????
Is there any study that shows terrorism has been reduced by these ludicrous restrictions?? IVe not seen or heard of one that 'a for sure. Also the hand wipe screen which often shows hair products as having components of explosives- what's the point there? Doesn't the TSA think terrorists would use gloves; discard and then wash their hand thoroughly? In my opinion if someone wants to commit a heinous crime they'll outwit the TSA and their carry on baggage restrictions without too much problem- and they will be unlikely to draw attention to themselves by having artificial joints that contain metal!!!!!!!

Anonymous said...

If the TSA won't allow bottles of 'Ensure' or diabetic shakes etc', can't they at least force airports to have 1 drug store on site to sell them like European airports. For many people it's impossible to buy food when on a restricted diet!

Anonymous said...

To the Anonymous who asked if the TSA could use some common sense, a three-striper screener recently told me that they are not allowed to use common sense.

So sad you are assaulted every time you want to get on a plane due to your medical condition. Sounds like a violation of the ADA.

Anonymous said...

Apparently Canada actually CAN figure out what is and isn't water!!!!!!

JP said...

The MyTSA app sounds really helpful. How often does the app get updated as far as "things I can bring"?