Tuesday, August 12, 2014

Travel Tips Tuesday: Getting Through Security as Conveniently as Possible


Being stressed because you’re rushing to get to your flight on time is no fun. In this week’s Travel Tips post, here are a few reminders of steps you can take to help you get to your flight on time with as little stress as possible.  
Pack properly. When packing your bags, make sure they are not over weight or over-sized. Rearranging your bags at the ticket counter not only delays you but holds up other passengers also.

Arrive early. Leave your house with enough time to get to the airport at least two hours before your flight. You never know how long the lines at the ticket counter or security checkpoint may be. Also, if you park in one of the airport parking lots or garages, take note of where your car is parked. We all know how stressful it is not being able to find your car after you return from a trip. 

Verify ticket information. Make sure the name on your ticket matches the name on your ID. If there is a discrepancy, it may take a few extra minutes to get cleared by a TSA supervisor and approve use of the boarding pass. Also, ensure you have proper identification.

Be ready for screening. Once you are at the security line, make sure you remove everything from your bag required by TSA. Remove your 3-1-1 liquids bag from your carry-on bag –– if you don’t, more than likely the TSA officer will call for a bag check. Your laptop has to be removed and placed separately in a bin. TSA Pre eligible travelers have the convenience of not having to remove these items.

If you are traveling with electronic devices including medical equipment, such as a CPAP machine or even a video game system, you must remove and place separately in a bin.  

Before going through the advanced imaging technology, remove any large bulky jewelry and belts. Check your pockets and remove everything; then place the items bin on the X-ray belt. TSA officers may ask you to double check if you have anything in your pockets – it’s common to forget to remove wallets and keys. Any anomalies detected by the screening equipment may result in a pat-down.
Taking the time to follow these tips can help you get to your flight on time.   

Have a safe flight!
Karla
TSA Guest Blogger

25 comments:

RB said...

Why do belts need to be removed? Same question for bulky jewelry, taking everything out of pockets and so on?

Apparently TSA's Strip Search Machines false alarm on the littlest items like a scrap of paper.

This is what our $8 Million Tax Dollars pays for, dysfunctunal TSA and TSA junk equipment.

Rose Curnutt said...

TSA pre-check is the way to go!

Anonymous said...

Belts dont have to be removed. People do hide stuff in belts so if it is an area of suspicion it will be checked. Leave the cowboy buckle at home or pack it. Jewlery never needs to be removed. I guess that RB does not travel often. The machines that are being refered to as "Strip search" are gone. The scrap of paper is not something that should be there because it is not part of your body. I think that the TSA does a great job, and those that can read and/or follow the rules dont have any issues with them or the machines. All always works well for me.

Anonymous said...

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense.

Anonymous said...

Pre Check should be the standard level of screening for all passengers. I watched a majority of passengers get sent through the pre check line at Orlando last month. Everything went smoothly and people were through security in a few minutes. No planes fell from the sky even though hundreds of passengers kept their shoes on. Of course the rest of the world doesn't require shoe removal and their flights are just as safe.

Anonymous said...

Well said Anonymous

RB said...

Anonymous said...
Belts dont have to be removed. People do hide stuff in belts so if it is an area of suspicion it will be checked. Leave the cowboy buckle at home or pack it. Jewlery never needs to be removed. I guess that RB does not travel often. The machines that are being refered to as "Strip search" are gone. The scrap of paper is not something that should be there because it is not part of your body. I think that the TSA does a great job, and those that can read and/or follow the rules dont have any issues with them or the machines. All always works well for me.

August 13, 2014 at 6:10 AM
..........................
Anon,perhaps you should have read the article posted by Karla, TSA Guest Blogger.

"Before going through the advanced imaging technology, remove any large bulky jewelry and belts. Check your pockets and remove everything; then place the items bin on the X-ray belt. TSA officers may ask you to double check if you have anything in your pockets – it’s common to forget to remove wallets and keys. Any anomalies detected by the screening equipment may result in a pat-down. Taking the time to follow these tips can help you get to your flight on time."

Then you go on to say that belts don't have to be removed although you claim that people hide "stuff" in belts. Exactly what evidence do you have to support that claim? Even if someone was to hide something in their belt unless it is WEI it is none of TSA's business.

The only part of your statement that is partially true is that belts do not have to be removed if being screened by Pre-Check screening standards although I'm sure TSA can make an exception even then.

As far as the Strip Search Machines being gone that is just not true.

TSA removed the Backscatter X-ray based Strip Search Machines after Congress mandated that Privacy Improvements be added. The manufacturer of the Backscatter Machines was unable to meet that demand so those machines were removed.

The MMW Strip Search machines did get the Privacy Improvement added yet these machines are the exact same ones that have the ability to store and transmit graphic images.

What the public sees now is the Gumby screen that shows a representative outline of the person being screened.

Regardless of the Privacy Improvements TSA did nothing to eliminate the machines capability to capture, store, and transmit naked images.

I would suggest you educate yourself before taking me or anyone else to task when you are obviously not well informed.

Anonymous said...

I hate to get personal, but wearing underwire bras seems to be a big problem for the full body scanners. I wear them and are always getting patted down after the scan. It's embarassing! Is there anything TSA can do about this?

Anonymous said...

I echo the sentiments of Anonymous of 13 Aug with reference to excusion of military retirees as a low risk group in the Precheck program. It is disingenuous and disrespectful to those, who by the very duration of service, have evidenced minimal risk. TSA joins the rank of the VA in forgetting the inherent value of contribution and loyalty.
BTW the current DOD ID card for retirees includes a DOD identification number bar-coded on reverse.
PY

Anonymous said...

RB Said.....
Regardless of the Privacy Improvements TSA did nothing to eliminate the machines capability to capture, store, and transmit naked images.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
This is whare you are wrong. There is no NEKED Image to store or capture. and there is no way for this machine to transmit anything. I know this because I work on these machines.

Anonymous said...

"The machines that are being refered to as 'Strip search' are gone."

Incorrect. The millimeter wave body scanners have the same capability to generate nude images that they had before the privacy filters were implemented.

Consider it this way: The Gumby-like filtered image that is seen at the checkpoint is not detailed enough for a potential threat to be identified simply by looking at the Gumby image! It is analysis of the unfiltered image that identifies the potential threat and displays it on the Gumby image!

Honestly, I am surprised that the Anything for Safety crowd (i.e., the people who automatically feel that anything TSA implements is justified) is not completely in favor of nude body imaging and calling for removal of the filters.

Anonymous said...

How do we get through security without TSA impersonators attempting to feel us up in the private rooms?

Why is TSA trying to hide what happened at SFO with the TSA impersonator? Has TSA magically developed authority over sexual assault and illegal detention cases?

Anonymous said...

RB said...The MMW Strip Search machines did get the Privacy Improvement added yet these machines are the exact same ones that have the ability to store and transmit graphic images.

What the public sees now is the Gumby screen that shows a representative outline of the person being screened.

Regardless of the Privacy Improvements TSA did nothing to eliminate the machines capability to capture, store, and transmit naked images.



What proof do you have of this?? If we only see the "Gumby" images as you call them then that is all the TSA people can see. Where do these, so called "naked images" get stored and who is able to look at them?

Susan Richart said...

Anonymous wrote: "Has TSA magically developed authority over sexual assault and illegal detention cases?"

The SF Sheriff's Office has taken over the criminal investigation of this event.

What I find strange is that for some reason or another, the TSA can't find the women who were molested.

You can bet if these women had avoided screening, the TSA would have been able to find them.

TSA doesn't want to find them because TSA doesn't want a discussion of the sexual nature of its assaults on the flying public.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

RB said...

Anonymous said...
RB said...The MMW Strip Search machines did get the Privacy Improvement added yet these machines are the exact same ones that have the ability to store and transmit graphic images.

What the public sees now is the Gumby screen that shows a representative outline of the person being screened.

Regardless of the Privacy Improvements TSA did nothing to eliminate the machines capability to capture, store, and transmit naked images.



What proof do you have of this?? If we only see the "Gumby" images as you call them then that is all the TSA people can see. Where do these, so called "naked images" get stored and who is able to look at them?

August 13, 2014 at 3:07 PM


How about the TSA contract specifications? Is that suitable proof?

http://epic.org/open_gov/foia/TSA_Procurement_Specs.pdf

What has changed is that the WBI no longer transmits an image to a remotely located computer to be viewed by a person, that is now done electronically and the results displayed on the Gumby Screen.

What hasn't changed is that these are the same machines that can transmit images, can store images, and these capabilities were mandated by TSA.

When a person is scanned by one of these machines the core detailed electronic image can be stored and transmitted. TSA claims that these features are disabled but we all know that TSA has proven issues with honesty, truth, and integrity.

Even if these features are turned off that doesn't the ability is gone are that it can be turned on without notice to the public.

Why would TSA mandate the ability to both store and transmit naked images if there was no intent or reason to use that capability?

Anonymous said...

"...Arrive early. Leave your house with enough time to get to the airport at least two hours before your flight. You never know how long the lines at the ticket counter or security checkpoint may be. "

I know the security checks take time, but two hours? Really? The flight I am about to take it only two and half hours.

The security we had before the TSA didn't add two hours to every trip, maybe we should be headed that way instead of this theatre of the absurd that TSA is building.

Marsha x3 said...

If you don't believe the millimeter wave scanners don't take a revealing image, perhaps look on this very blotter to see the images. Yes, they do show all of the contours of the body, revealing personal and private details. This is the TSA itself saying these are the images the MMW scanner takes.

In fact, the images the American public is shown are lower in resolution than the full capabilities of the machine. Since the TSA hides information from Congress and the American public, we don't have any way of knowing how high of a resolution image is taken and stored by millimeter wave scanners.

To the Anonymous person who claims to work on millimeter wave scanners, in what capacity do you "work on them?"

Anonymous said...

And for god's sake, make sure you don't live in the District. The agents have no idea where that is!!!

Anonymous said...

And for god's sake, make sure you don't live in the District. The agents have no idea where that is!!!

Anonymous said...

I believe they should remove the filters. Security trumps privacy. Don't like it - don't fly!

Anonymous said...

Anonymous asked...
-How do we get through security without TSA impersonators attempting to feel us up in the private rooms?-

You can start by making sure the individual has a TSA uniform on. The guy at SFO didn’t. Interesting that people choose to blame the TSA for something that the TSA had absolutely nothing to do with. Not a thing! I cant talk for others, but that sure makes me curious how far some of these posters are willing to go to further their agenda.

TSORon said...

Anonymous said...
[[The security we had before the TSA didn't add two hours to every trip, maybe we should be headed that way instead of this theatre of the absurd that TSA is building.]]

And that security allowed the events of 9/11/2001 to happen. Read the 9/11 Commission report and you will see how poorly that level of security truly was.

Wintermute said...

TSORon said..."And that security allowed the events of 9/11/2001 to happen. Read the 9/11 Commission report and you will see how poorly that level of security truly was."

We've been through this before, Ron. That report apparently does not say what you think it does, or are you going to cite non-relevant sections of it as you've done in past arguments?

Anonymous said...

Ron, Ron, Ron. The tragic events of 9/11/01 are your go-to when people dare to question your beloved employer, but you know the terrorists would never have been caught if the TSA existed then, and they did not carry prohibited items.

The DHS & TSA were created in a power grab and the disgusting and unConstitutional policies and procedures perpetrated by screeners every week on millions of people never has been nor ever will be excused by the terrible actions of a dozen men thirteen years ago.

Shame on you for besmirching the memory of those lost on 9/11/01 to further your and your employer's oppressive agenda.

Anonymous said...

TSORon said...
Anonymous said...
[[The security we had before the TSA didn't add two hours to every trip, maybe we should be headed that way instead of this theatre of the absurd that TSA is building.]]

And that security allowed the events of 9/11/2001 to happen. Read the 9/11 Commission report and you will see how poorly that level of security truly was.

August 23, 2014 at 3:11 PM
---------------------------------what color is the sky in your world, TSORon?? the 911 attacks were the result of exploitation of two factors that have since changed. first, passengers and crew had been long conditioned to compliance with a hijacker, due to the defection hijackings of the 70s. second, the cockpit doors were easily accessed and not kept locked, since no one had ever used an airliner as a weapon before. both are corrected. TSA security theatre is just that: theatre. it accomplishes no more in terms of prevention, and arguably less, since red team results before 911 were better than after. it also is more time-consuming and more frustrating (especially to those who understand that it makes us not even a tiny bit safer), creating a tangible negative impact to the economy and to the traveling public.