Friday, July 11, 2014

TSA Week in Review – 35 Loaded Firearms, 74 Credit Card Knives, Bear Repellent and Other Interesting Items Discovered This Week



Due to the Fourth of July holiday, this report reflects the last eight days (7/3 - 7/10).
Bear Repellant
Bear Repellant
Bear Repellant - Eight ounces of bear repellant was detected in a carry-on bag at Phoenix (PHX). While traveling can be a bear at times, bear repellent is not needed in the cabin of an aircraft. You can pack bear repellent in your checked bags if the volume is less than four ounces and it has less than a 2 percent active ingredient of either CS or CN. Most bear repellants exceed these limitations. Learn more about prohibited items here.

Grenade-shaped Vaping Device (SLC)
Grenade-shaped Vaping Device (SLC)
Inert Ordnance and Grenades etc. – We continue to find inert grenades and other weaponry on a weekly basis. Please keep in mind that if an item looks like a real bomb, grenade, mine, etc., it is prohibited. When these items are found at a checkpoint or in checked baggage, they can cause significant delays because the explosives detection professionals must resolve the alarm to determine the level of threat. Even if they are novelty items, you cannot bring them on a plane.  Read here on why inert items cause problems.
Live Smoke Grenade
Live Smoke Grenade

  • An inert grenade was discovered in checked baggage at Denver (DEN).
  • An inert grenade packed in a cargo shipment caused a 1-hour, 18-minute evacuation at the San Francisco (SFO) cargo facility.
  • A grenade-shaped vaping device was discovered in a carry-on bag at Salt Lake City (SLC). Ecig’s and vaping devices are permitted in your carry-on and checked bags…unless they look like a grenade. Read more about e-cigarettes here
  • A live smoke grenade was discovered in a carry-on bag at Seattle (STL).

Artfully Concealed Prohibited Items – It’s important to examine your bags prior to traveling to ensure prohibited items are not inside. If a prohibited item is discovered in your bag or on your body, you could be cited and possibly arrested by local law enforcement. Here are a few examples from this week where prohibited items were found by our officers in strange places. 
Knife In Shoe (DTW), Brush Knife (DEN), Comb Knives (DTW) & (MCI), Credit Card Knife (MSP)
Knife In Shoe (DTW), Brush Knife (DEN), Comb Knives (DTW) & (MCI) Card Knife (MSP)
  • Credit Card Knives - 74 credit card knives were discovered this week. 14 were discovered at Tampa (TPA), 13 at Minneapolis (MSP), 12 at Nashville (BNA), 10 at San Francisco (SFO), three at Bismarck(BIS), two at Colorado Springs (COS), two at Knoxville (TYS), two at Long Beach (LGB), two at Manchester (MHT), two at Rapid City (RAP), two at St. Petersburg (PIE), and the remainder were discovered at Cincinnati (CVG), Duluth (DLH), Fargo (FAR), Fort Lauderdale (FLL), Grand Rapids (GRR), Orange County (SNA), Providence (PVD), Sarasota (SRQ), St. Croix (STX), and Williston (ISN). Check out this blog post for more information on credit card knives.
  • Two comb-knives were discovered at Kansas City (MCI), and Detroit (DTW).
  • A brush dagger was discovered at Denver (DEN).
  • A knife was discovered concealed in the sole of a shoe at Detroit (DTW).
Gun Knife & Bullet (NYL), Switchblades (BWI), Double Throwing Knife (ONT)
Miscellaneous Prohibited Items In addition to all of the other prohibited items we find weekly, our officers also regularly find firearm components, realistic replica firearms, bb and pellet guns, airsoft guns, brass knuckles, ammunition, batons and a lot of sharp pointy things…

Fireworks discovered at PHX & PIT
Fireworks discovered at PHX & PIT
Stun Guns – 17 stun guns were discovered this week in carry-on bags around the nation: three were discovered at San Francisco (SFO) and the remainder were discovered at Atlanta (ATL), Boise (BOI), Chicago O'Hare (ORD), Cleveland (CLE), Dallas Love (DAL), Denver (DEN), Fresno (FAT), Huntsville (HSV), Kansas City (MCI), Nashville (BNA), Norfolk (ORF), Richmond (RIC), Seattle (SEA) and Tulsa (TUL).

Ammunition – When packed properly, ammunition can be transported in your checked baggage, but it is never permissible to pack ammo in your carry-on bag.
Ammunition discovered in carry-on bags at IAH & MEM
Ammunition discovered in carry-on bags at IAH & MEM
After alarming advanced imaging technology, a Jacksonville (JAX) traveler divested a magazine with six rounds of 9mm ammunition from his pants pocket.
After alarming advanced imaging technology, a Jacksonville (JAX) traveler divested a magazine with six rounds of 9mm ammunition from his pants pocket.
42 Firearms Discovered This Week – Of the 42 firearms, 35 were loaded and nine had rounds chambered. 

Firearms Discovered at (Left - Right / Top to Bottom) PHX, RDU, ATL, PHX & BOI
Firearms Discovered at (Left - Right / Top to Bottom) PHX, RDU, ATL, PHX & BOI
 42 Firearms Discovered This Week – Of the 42 firearms, 35 were loaded and nine had rounds chambered.
*In order to provide a timely weekly update, this data is compiled from a preliminary report. The year-end numbers will vary slightly from what is reported in the weekly updates. However, any monthly, midyear or end-of-year numbers TSA provides on this blog or elsewhere will be actual numbers and not estimates.

You can travel with your firearms in checked baggage, but they must first be declared to the airline. You can go here for more details on how to properly travel with your firearms. Firearm possession laws vary by state and locality. Travelers should familiarize themselves with state and local firearm laws for each point of travel prior to departure.

Unfortunately these sorts of occurrences are all too frequent which is why we talk about these finds. Sure, it’s great to share the things that our officers are finding, but at the same time, each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with a citation or in some cases is even arrested. The passenger can face a penalty as high as $7,500. This is a friendly reminder to please leave these items at home. Just because we find a prohibited item on an individual does not mean they had bad intentions, that's for the law enforcement officer to decide. In many cases, people simply forgot they had these items.

If you haven’t seen it yet, make sure you check out our TSA Blog Year in Review for 2013. You can also check out 2011 & 2012 as well.

Follow @TSABlogTeam on Twitter and Instagram!


If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact us by clicking here.

41 comments:

Anonymous said...

There is no reason for bringing loaded guns to the airport.The offenders should be fined, maybe we will have less problems with the possibility of somebody using their guns at any time in the terminal or inside the planes.

Anonymous said...

The people who tried to bring these items on an airplane should be prosecuted to the full extent. There is NO way that you dont know that you have packed a gun or knife in your carry-on luggage. Stiffer penalties, fines & sentences will make these dummies think before trying to sneak these weapons onto a plane.

RB said...

What, no mention of the TSA Sky Habor failures?

Anonymous said...

Was the TSO who found the bear repellant the same Phoenix TSO who missed the loaded gun and knife?

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2014/07/10/tsa-misses-loaded-gun-knife-on-passengers-boarding-separate-london-bound/

SSSS for Some Reason said...

And not a single terrorist attached to any of those sharp things, or pointy things, or even the gun things.

Keep up the good work. You'll find one eventually.

Anonymous said...

The bigger news this week is the gun and knife that were missed.

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2014/07/10/tsa-misses-loaded-gun-knife-on-passengers-boarding-separate-london-bound/?intcmp=latestnews

If they had been flying domestically, they never would have been caught. I wonder how many weapons are missed. The last published statistic was 70%, but that was years ago. The TSA should probably update us on the current failure rate.

Anonymous said...

Are you counting the toy gun Lisa Farbstein was all in a tizzy about earlier this week on Twitter? Is that one of your "good catches?" A toy gun?

@skywaymanaz said...

IMHO screeners missed the gun and the knife because in general they seem to be highly reliant on target recognition software to point them out. I frequently travel with an aviation GPS when I am picking up a plane to fly in another city. The screen on it is the size of a credit card. The same size and shape of knives TSA boasts week in, week out they've caught lately. I've seen it on the X-Ray in a number of cities and if something is next to it in the bag it often shows as a solid black shape. Only rarely does a screener do a bag check to see what is causing this. I've never had a problem with them asking for a bag check and honestly with a black shape that big they should be. I'm always happy to let the screener know what it is and gladly show them how to turn it on. Honestly it's been years though since anyone bothered. Since I know what the object is there's no reason for me to bring it to the screeners attention if they fail to show any interest. Honestly why would anyone in that situation? All that would do is make you a target for retribution if the screener took offense at someone suggesting they aren't doing their job. I suspect the screeners are too busy looking for contraband water bottles and toothpaste to worry about guns and knives.

Anonymous said...

Is it true that the TSA will be removing the walk through metal detectors from some or all of the precheck lines and installing millimeter wave scanners?

Is the plan to remove as many WTMD options for travelers as possible?

Anonymous said...

So no mention of the knife and gun missed in separate incidents at Sky Harbor in Phoenix? How about the fact that DHS/TSA is letting illegal immigrants fly without any ID except an easily reproducible court document with no pictures, watermarks, etc.?

Screen shot taken.

RB said...

Anonymous said...The bigger news this week is the gun and knife that were missed.http://www.foxnews.com/us/2014/07/10/tsa-misses-loaded-gun-knife-on-passengers-boarding-separate-london-bound/?intcmp=latestnewsIf they had been flying domestically, they never would have been caught. I wonder how many weapons are missed. The last published statistic was 70%, but that was years ago. The TSA should probably update us on the current failure rate.July 12, 2014 at 1:21 PM
_________________________________________
TSA won't publish current Red Team test information as they know it would further demonstrate the incompetence of TSA and its employees.

RB said...

Anonymous said...Is it true that the TSA will be removing the walk through metal detectors from some or all of the precheck lines and installing millimeter wave scanners?Is the plan to remove as many WTMD options for travelers as possible?July 13, 2014 at 9:26 AM
_______________________________________

Why wouldn't TSA remove one of the two legacy screening devices that actually work?

My personal screening experiences with TSA MMW body scanners indicate a 50+% false alarm rate and for the ETD a 100% false alarm rate.

What more could we unimportant taxpayers want from TSA.

Anonymous said...

If I am a Trusted Traveler, why can I not bring on board large bottles of water and such?

"The people who tried to bring these items on an airplane should be prosecuted to the full extent...."

As should the people who bring on the dangerous large bottles of water?

Marsha x3 said...

Why are you so obsessed with credit card knives, blotter team, to the point of constantly mentioning them in your blotter titles?

I'd never heard of them before you started mentioning them all the time. Seems like they're the kind of knife you would have let through if the flight attendant unions hadn't melted into fearful goo over getting realistic about small pocketknives and the like.

Maybe I should pick up a few of the confiscated ones cheap from the state surplus store and throw them in my carryon? Boost your numbers with even more fake data.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
There is no reason for bringing loaded guns to the airport.The offenders should be fined, maybe we will have less problems with the possibility of somebody using their guns at any time in the terminal or inside the planes.

---------------------------------

the reason for bringing a loaded gun to an airport is the same reason that Americans should be allowed to carry a loaded gun pretty much anywhere. the Constitution says so. none of these confiscated weapons were intended for harm, but for self-protection.

Anonymous said...

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense.

Anonymous said...

Another week, another utter lack of anything that required TSA's slow, invasive, and useless naked body scanners to be found. When will you admit that the naked body scanners were a pathetic mistake?

Meanwhile, how many false positives did TSA's naked body scanners cause? How many people had to suffer pat-downs from TSA screeners because you're using dumb technology that can't tell the difference between a gun and pleats on a pair of slacks? And why are Curtis Burns and West Cooper afraid to address this question, let alone answer it?

/screenshot

GSOLTSO said...

Anon sez - "Is it true that the TSA will be removing the walk through metal detectors from some or all of the precheck lines and installing millimeter wave scanners?"

I have not heard that, if you have a link to a source indicating that, we would love to see it. I have heard that some AIT machines have been added to dedicated Pre-check lines in order to provide alternate screening methods for someone that is unable to pass through the WTMD without alarming - but not that AIT was replacing WTMD in Pre-check lines.

Marsha x3 sez - "Why are you so obsessed with credit card knives, blotter team, to the point of constantly mentioning them in your blotter titles?"

We are not obsessed, we have simply seen a large increase in these items at the checkpoints. In the interest of trying to get as many people educated as possible, we keep mentioning them in the hopes that fewer people (actually, none would be the preference!) will bring them into the checkpoints. They are a neat little tool, but are currently on the prohibited items list for the checkpoint.

West
TSA Blog Team

Anonymous said...

http://www.wftv.com/news/news/local/orlando-tsa-agents-getting-geography-refresher/ngfmH/

Why do your agents continue to show a complete inability to recognize valid pieces of identification?

Anonymous said...

I see that Curtis Burns and West Cooper are still afraid to address the false positives question, let alone answer it. Pathetic.

/screenshot

RB said...

Anonymous said...
I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations.
________________________________
There is no justification for TSA's discrimination againt retired military.

TSA claims they want to move as many people as possible into the low risk Pre Check groups but completely thumbs its collective nose at people who served in the military long enough to have retired, people who proved through service that they honor and defended the United States.

It's a shame that TSA employees can't say the same for themselves and I would bet a coke that TSA employees get PreCheck for free even when we know that the ranks of TSA are infested with all manner of criminals.

Anonymous said...

On the live smoke grenade, STL is St. Louis/Lambert not Seattle.

Anonymous said...

GSOLTSO said...

Anonymous asked, "Is it true that the TSA will be removing the walk through metal detectors from some or all of the precheck lines and installing millimeter wave scanners?"

I have not heard that, if you have a link to a source indicating that, we would love to see it. I have heard that some AIT machines have been added to dedicated Pre-check lines in order to provide alternate screening methods for someone that is unable to pass through the WTMD without alarming - but not that AIT was replacing WTMD in Pre-check lines.



I am glad you answered my question, West. If someone has metal medical implants, she can go through the millimeter wave scanners at precheck? Will she still be touched after going through the scanner, which usually happens in the regular lanes? Will this be a full body touching or just on her wound, scar, or medical device?

How does this improve the precheck experience of travelers with metal medical implants?

Also, will precheck travelers be "randomly" forced to go through the millimeter wave scanners rather than the walk through metal detector, or is it strictly a traveler's choice?

GSOLTSO said...

Anon sez - "I am glad you answered my question, West. If someone has metal medical implants, she can go through the millimeter wave scanners at precheck? Will she still be touched after going through the scanner, which usually happens in the regular lanes? Will this be a full body touching or just on her wound, scar, or medical device?

How does this improve the precheck experience of travelers with metal medical implants?

Also, will precheck travelers be "randomly" forced to go through the millimeter wave scanners rather than the walk through metal detector, or is it strictly a traveler's choice?"

Glad I was able to answer the question! Do you have some links or references to the idea that TSA was replacing WTMD with AIT?

Any passenger can use the AIT for screening if they prefer or need to (for medical reasons, or simply becuase they prefer to use them) - as long as there is an AIT available.

As with the use of AIT for screening anywhere, all anomalies discovered by the AIT will have to be resolved the same way. An area identified as an anomaly will be patted down.

The AIT adds the ability for passengers with metallic implants, braces or other assistive devices that alarm the WTMD to be screened via a method other than the full patdown. We have many passengers (not just Pre travelers) that actually request to use to the AIT all the time.

I have not heard of people being forced to use the AIT on Pre lanes. Again, if you have links to stories or articles indicating this, I would love to see them so I may read up on it.

West
TSA Blog Team

RB said...

West, when will you or anyone else at TSA finally answer the Nitroglycerin Pill question?

Still waiting and don't think for a moment this will just go away.

Anonymous said...

Orlando TSA agent who stopped DC man didn't know where "District of Columbia" was

"@TSA Agent in Orlando never heard of "District of Columbia." Demanded passport because he didn't believe my drivers license was from US!?
6:32 AM - 12 Jul 2014"


And these are the people ensuring our safety when flying.

GSOLTSO said...

RB sez - "West, when will you or anyone else at TSA finally answer the Nitroglycerin Pill question?"


According to the "Can I take" app at TSA.gov

Search Results For:

nitroglycerin pills
nitro pills
nitroglycerin patch

All of the above give the following response -

Check or Carry-on (which means the items are allowed to be carried in both Checked baggage and/or Carry-on baggage)

TSA allows larger amounts of medically necessary liquids, gels, and aerosols in reasonable quantities for your trip, but you must declare them to security officers at the checkpoint for inspection.
We recommend, but do not require, that your medications be labeled to facilitate the security process.

You may carry non-medically necessary liquids, gels and aerosols in your carry-on bags only if they adhere to the 3-1-1 rule: containers must be 3.4 ounces or less; stored in a 1 quart/liter zip-top bag; 1 zip-top bag per person. Larger amounts of non-medicinal liquids, gels, and aerosols must be placed in checked baggage.

Even if an item is generally permitted, it may be subject to additional screening or not allowed through the checkpoint if it triggers an alarm during the screening process, appears to have been tampered with, or poses other security concerns. The final decision rests with TSA on whether to allow any items on the plane.

West
TSA Blog Team

Anonymous said...

"As with the use of AIT for screening anywhere, all anomalies discovered by the AIT will have to be resolved the same way. An area identified as an anomaly will be patted down."

In a given week, how many of the "anomalies" identified by the naked body scanners turn out to be dangerous objects, and how many do not?

In a given week, how many of the "anomalies" identified by the naked body scanners turn out to be nonexistent -- that is, a subsequent physical search finds nothing at all?

Why are West Cooper and Curtis Burns unwilling to address, let alone answer, these questions?

/screenshot

Anonymous said...

I use my backpack for hiking and as my carry on bag, twice I've had an item fall through a hole in the pocket and into the lining once a knife (made the hole) and once a lighter. It can happen. I have since repaired the hole.

RB said...

GSOLTSO said...

According to the "Can I take" app at TSA.gov

Search Results For:

nitroglycerin pills
nitro pills
nitroglycerin patch

All of the above give the following response -

Check or Carry-on (which means the items are allowed to be carried in both Checked baggage and/or Carry-on baggage)

TSA allows larger amounts of medically necessary liquids, gels, and aerosols in reasonable quantities for your trip, but you must declare them to security officers at the checkpoint for inspection.
We recommend, but do not require, that your medications be labeled to facilitate the security process.

You may carry non-medically necessary liquids, gels and aerosols in your carry-on bags only if they adhere to the 3-1-1 rule: containers must be 3.4 ounces or less; stored in a 1 quart/liter zip-top bag; 1 zip-top bag per person. Larger amounts of non-medicinal liquids, gels, and aerosols must be placed in checked baggage.

Even if an item is generally permitted, it may be subject to additional screening or not allowed through the checkpoint if it triggers an alarm during the screening process, appears to have been tampered with, or poses other security concerns. The final decision rests with TSA on whether to allow any items on the plane.

West
TSA Blog Team

July 16, 2014 at 10:13 AM
............
West, you may think I am being a pain in the tukhus but the response you keep giving does not answer the question. No where in the response is Medical Nitro mentioned.

Here is a search for Insulin, see the difference?

Search Results For:
insulin

Check or Carry-on
Please notify the Transportation Security Officer that you have diabetes and are carrying your supplies with you. Insulin pumps and supplies must be accompanied by insulin, and insulin in any form or dispenser must be clearly identified.
TSA allows larger amounts of medically necessary liquids, gels, and aerosols in reasonable quantities for your trip, but you must declare them to security officers at the checkpoint for inspection.

The following diabetes-related supplies and equipment are allowed through the checkpoint once they have been screened:

Insulin and insulin loaded dispensing products: vials or box of individual vials, jet injectors, biojectors, epipens, infusers, and preloaded syringes.

Ice or ice packs to keep insulin cool.

Unlimited number of unused syringes when accompanied by insulin or other injectable medication.

Lancets, blood glucose meters, blood glucose meter test strips, alcohol swabs, and meter-testing solutions.

Insulin pump and insulin pump supplies: cleaning agents, batteries, plastic tubing, infusion kit, catheter, and needle.

Glucagon emergency kit.

Urine ketone test strips.

Unlimited number of used syringes when transported in Sharps disposal container or other similar hard-surface container.

Sharps disposal containers or similar hard-surface disposal container for storing used syringes and test strips.

Even if an item is generally permitted, it may be subject to additional screening or not allowed through the checkpoint if it triggers an alarm during the screening process, appears to have been tampered with, or poses other security concerns. The final decision rests with TSA on whether to allow any items on the plane.


Throughout that passage the medicine in question is mentioned.

But when you look a the medical nitro passage it doesn't mention medical nitro once.

That's my beef, the TSA Can I Take It tool is not responsive to the question.

Lauren Clark said...

wondering if these statistics also include anyone with the law enforcement on planes who are allowed to have their weapons

GSOLTSO said...

RB sez - "West, you may think I am being a pain in the tukhus but the response you keep giving does not answer the question. No where in the response is Medical Nitro mentioned."

I do not think you are being a pain at all. Insulin traditionally has other items transported with it (sharps, coolers, ice packs) that require further mention and explanation in many cases. Medical nitro (in all forms) traditionally does not require anything but a container for transport. I keep posting the information I have available in the hopes that someone with similar questions will find the information they need.

Lauren Clark sez - "wondering if these statistics also include anyone with the law enforcement on planes who are allowed to have their weapons"

No, the statistics do not include LEOs flying armed. All the weapons in these reports were discovered on/with passengers entering checkpoints or in their checked baggage in some cases.

West
TSA Blog Team

Anonymous said...

West Cooper, why are you and Curtis Burns refusing to address the multiple questions about false positives?

/screenshot

RB said...

GSOLTSO said...
RB sez - "West, you may think I am being a pain in the tukhus but the response you keep giving does not answer the question. No where in the response is Medical Nitro mentioned."

I do not think you are being a pain at all. Insulin traditionally has other items transported with it (sharps, coolers, ice packs) that require further mention and explanation in many cases. Medical nitro (in all forms) traditionally does not require anything but a container for transport. I keep posting the information I have available in the hopes that someone with similar questions will find the information they need.

Lauren Clark sez - "wondering if these statistics also include anyone with the law enforcement on planes who are allowed to have their weapons"

No, the statistics do not include LEOs flying armed. All the weapons in these reports were discovered on/with passengers entering checkpoints or in their checked baggage in some cases.

West
TSA Blog Team

July 17, 2014 at 4:45 AM
..............
West, the Can I Take information never says that Medical Nitro is allowed. Period, Full Stop, End of Message.

How hard is it to understand that the information returned is not responsive to the question?

GSOLTSO said...

Rb sez - "West, the Can I Take information never says that Medical Nitro is allowed. Period, Full Stop, End of Message.

How hard is it to understand that the information returned is not responsive to the question?"

The response gives you a green background with the outline for a suitcase and a carryon bag, which indicates it is allowed. When an item is not found or not allowed, it gives a red background with an X inside a circle. When the results come back on nitro pills, it gives a green background as described above, thus meaning the item(s) are allowed.

West
TSA Blog Team

RB said...

GSOLTSO said...
Rb sez - "West, the Can I Take information never says that Medical Nitro is allowed. Period, Full Stop, End of Message.

How hard is it to understand that the information returned is not responsive to the question?"

The response gives you a green background with the outline for a suitcase and a carryon bag, which indicates it is allowed. When an item is not found or not allowed, it gives a red background with an X inside a circle. When the results come back on nitro pills, it gives a green background as described above, thus meaning the item(s) are allowed.

West
TSA Blog Team

July 17, 2014 at 10:35 AM
....................
Show me in the verbiage where it says Nitro Pills are allowed.

It doesn't. Symbols may indicate something is allowed but the fact of the matter is that information is missing.

Don't know if this is on my end or what but the Captcha has an Ad Choice link in it now for Photo Sphere.

RB said...

GSOLTSO said...
Rb sez - "West, the Can I Take information never says that Medical Nitro is allowed. Period, Full Stop, End of Message.

How hard is it to understand that the information returned is not responsive to the question?"

The response gives you a green background with the outline for a suitcase and a carryon bag, which indicates it is allowed. When an item is not found or not allowed, it gives a red background with an X inside a circle. When the results come back on nitro pills, it gives a green background as described above, thus meaning the item(s) are allowed.

West
TSA Blog Team

July 17, 2014 at 10:35 AM

OK West here is another example.

Search Results For:
cholesterol pills

Check or Carry-on
You may transport this item in carry-on baggage or in checked baggage. For items you wish to carry-on, you should check with the airline to ensure that the item will fit in the overhead bin or underneath the seat of the airplane.


See the difference. No ambiguity in this case. Should be the same for nitro pills.

Chico said...

Gotta agree with RB on this one, West. Medical nitro should have an entry that clearly states it is allowed in carry ons and checked bags, with no caveat that a screener may take it if he wrongly decides medical nitro is a "danger."

In fact, no medically necessary item should have a caveat that says the TSA will take it or make someone miss his flight other than if it triggers an alarm (and is confirmed the alarm isn't another false positive) or if it appears to be tampered with in such a way as to pose a threat to aviation safety.

Throwing in the rest of the extremely vague language about "poses other security concern" allows untrained and uninformed screeners the "power" to say, "I'm scared! You can't take it on a plane!" (See 2" toy sock monkey pistol incident and seizure of medical nitro, breast milk, juice, milk, baby food, etc. on more than one occasion.)

Maybe Americans will sadly accept losing a jar of mom's homemade jam, but no one getting on a plane in the US should be at risk of losing his health or life because the TSA wrongly seized his medicine or other medical aid/device/item.

RB said...

Saw the story about the non-security screener doing a couple of grope downs at SFO. Not sure how Covenant didn't have control over its screening area but the bigger question is why.

Why it's ok for an airport security screener to feel up women, men, or even little kids but not ok for anyone else to do it?

Something wrong with this picture.

RSF said...

OK, I guess I'm not supposed to be referring to people as being from Planet Idiot and calling them morons so please replace those words with "some other planet," and "people."
Thanks,
RSF

RB said...

RSF said...OK, I guess I'm not supposed to be referring to people as being from Planet Idiot and calling them morons so please replace those words with "some other planet," and "people."Thanks,RSFJuly 21, 2014 at 1:24 AM
______________________________

TSA employees can't handle the truth (they rarely use it) and hate being confronted with reality.