Friday, July 18, 2014

Traveling With Style and Beauty Products Through the Checkpoint



I hate to admit it, but I’m a bit of product junkie. When it comes to traveling, I don’t like to skimp on my favorite personal care products in exchange for travel sized brands. 

While I know I can stuff my checked bag full of products, my frugal side tells me to pack it all in my carry-on. 

When you spend your hard-earned money on beauty products that you really like, you certainly don’t want to have to toss them at the checkpoint, so I wanted to share some tips to ensure your products make it to your destination with you.

Even though the rule has been in effect since 2006, officers still continue to find liquid, gel and aerosol items in carry-on bags, often from passengers who haven’t traveled in a long time or who didn’t realize that their perfume or face cream is a liquid.  Our officers often hear”  “But this isn’t a liquid – it’s shampoo!”  Officers don’t enjoy telling passengers that their liquids can’t go through the checkpoint, so we’d much rather you pack them correctly.

Perfumes, lotions, shampoos and other liquid or cream cosmetics fall under TSA’s 3-1-1 rule. The 3-1-1 rule goes like this:  to be taken in a carry-on bag, all liquids, gels and aerosols must be in 3.4 ounce or smaller containers that fit in 1 sealed zip-top plastic bag, with only 1 bag per passenger. 
  • Use refillable perfume dispensers. There’s no need to pack your entire bottle of perfume or cologne as it’s likely over the 3.4 oz. limit. Instead, if you’re a frequent traveler, you can purchase a refillable travel-size  perfume bottle that meets 3-1-1 requirements. 
  • Pack your liquids, gels and aerosols separate from other toiletries. For many people, it makes sense to  pack your toothbrush with your toothpaste, and powder blush with liquid foundation to keep things all to one bag. It makes more sense to pack your liquids in the zip-top bag and put your razor, toothbrush, floss, lipstick and your solid deodorant in a separate bag. 
  • Pack oversize liquids in your checked bag. If you’re checking a bag, you can pack unlimited quantities of liquids in it. One tip I suggest to protect the other items in your bag is to put any shampoo, lotions, etc, in a cosmetics bag or zip-top bag, just in case anything opens in flight. That will prevent anything leaking onto your clothes. Many toiletry items, like liquid foundation or moisturizer with a pump, allows you to turn the pump in one direction to lock it.
  • You don’t have to throw it away. If you find yourself at the checkpoint with a 6 ounce jar of expensive face cream, throwing it away isn’t your only option. In many airports, there are kiosks where you can ship an item to your destination or back to your home.  You can also ask to leave the checkpoint and see if a store in the airport has a smaller container to put your product into, and then put that container in your zip-top bag and go back through security.  Another option would be to go back to the ticket counter and check your bag. Yes, these options cost money, but they are options for any traveler who would rather not throw out an expensive product. 
When in doubt, check it, ship it or buy it after arriving at your destination. I’ve done them all, and it’s worth it. Packing smarter on the front end reduces your chances of having to leave behind or pay to ship products when you’re at the airport. 


Bessy,
TSA Guest Blogger

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40 comments:

Anonymous said...

"You can also ask to leave the checkpoint and see if a store in the airport has a smaller container to put your product into, and then put that container in your zip-top bag and go back through security." What is stop a person from continuing on their terminal? What does the traveler do with the excess?

Anonymous said...

That TSOs toss any confiscated liquid items into the nearest trash bin and don't call in the bomb squad or hazardous materials teams shows the foolish of these policies. If liquids were really such an explosive risk, then why are they being tossed into the checkpoint trash bins?

Of course I fully expect this question to be ignored, as you and your co-workers never answer any hard-hitting questions.

Anonymous said...

I recently traveled after going camping. To go camping, I had used most of my normal travel toiletries, but then for some reason, after the camping trip, managed to lose or toss most of them. My next trip came, and I had no toiletries to worry about, because I followed the advice of buying them at the destination. I still opted for travel-size items (most stores will have a wall full of bins of little 1oz, 2oz size things just for this purpose), and was good to go. Of course, I followed the 3-1-1 rule for the return trip, but I have to say - traveling without, and buying at the destination made traveling very easy.

Now, if the TSA could only figure out how to fix the weather problems we've been having lately causing so many delays.

Anonymous said...

And then there are travelers like me who don't take beauty products. Wish I could say it was because I am just naturally gorgeous. But the truth is, I've reached an age where I'm beyond all help anyway! Plano TX

Susan Richart said...

"When you spend your hard-earned money on beauty products that you really like, you certainly don’t want to have to be forced to toss them at the checkpoint,....."

Fixed it for you, Bob.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Anonymous said...

OR....TSA can finally get a grip, realize that this 3oz rule is and always has been absurd. Though I'm not aware how I'm fairly sure those dangerous liquids can be powdered and then mixed later with the $3-5 dollar bottles of water we are forced to buy once inside security.
We wouldn't want to allow our $1 bottles to pass thru.
I recently had a TSA(male) have me unpack most of my suitcase and he had several others searching thru all my personal items as well for some aluminum hair clips he'd 'seen'(if he'd said what he'd seen I could have helped). I keep them attached to my flat iron bag. I tried to explain they separate your hair into sections as you style....he just stared at me.
I'm a travel agent. I travel often and I've spent the years post 9/11 hating it.
As a melanoma survivor and a heart patient this year I don't really need or want more exrays-especially those naked embarrassing ones. You know the 'private' ones that are all over the internet.... or to grabbed and pawed by an agent questioning underwires in my bra and pads in my crotch...really?
I saw an older gentleman reduced to tears over his medical waste bag. Just wrong.
I have had my liquids completely overlooked, a 2" knife key chain confiscated while completely ignored on a different trip.
We can no longer purchase alcohol on a cruise because it can't be carried home.
I'm certainly in favor if safety but none of these TSA rules and regulations lead to that. There has to be better ways. Perhaps using people actually trained in picking up on visual cues not a bunch of power crazed "agents" that seem to enjoy inconveniencing and scaring people.
Sorry I got off subject but I've come to hate flying.

Anonymous said...

"That TSOs toss any confiscated liquid items into the nearest trash bin and don't call in the bomb squad or hazardous materials teams shows the foolish of these policies. If liquids were really such an explosive risk, then why are they being tossed into the checkpoint trash bins?

Of course I fully expect this question to be ignored, as you and your co-workers never answer any hard-hitting questions."



Given 30 seconds of thought, this is very simple to answer.

It has been proven that liquid explosives are very easy to make and effective. TSA has three choices..
1) Allow ALL liquids into the checkpoint unscreened and run the risk of liquid bombs (inevitable) to enter the checkpoint
2) allow liquids into the checkpoint AFTER screening and create such a tremendious line while clearing liquids
3) ban all liquids.

The ligical choice that has the least negitive impact on the traveling public and insures the most safety is option 3.

This wasnt hard to figuer out.

Anonymous said...

"When you spend your hard-earned money on beauty products that you really like, you certainly don’t want to have to be forced to toss them at the checkpoint,....."

Nobody is ever FORCED to throw away their property. You can put them in your checked baggage, take them to your car, leave them with somebody not traveling or TSA will dispose of them for you at your request.
Its 100% up to you. But often people choose to blame TSA rather than admit they made a mistake or didnt know the 10 year old rules...

Anonymous said...

Just more reasons why I travel by any other means than by air. Too many ridiculous regulations. Also, I refuse to remove ANY article of clothing just to satisfy federal inspectors. Traveling is a luxury for me, and I insist on a dignified, relaxed environment and treatment when I do travel.

RB said...

Susan Richart said...
"When you spend your hard-earned money on beauty products that you really like, you certainly don’t want to have to be forced to toss them at the checkpoint,....."

Fixed it for you, Bob.

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

July 18, 2014 at 12:56 PM

...................
Not Bob???

Bessy,
TSA Guest Blogger

........
When TSA demonstrates that the items confiscated at the checkpoint present a real risk and stop tossing these items into common trash bins right at the checkpoint is the day I start taking TSA seriously.

TSA is just a modern day Chicken Little.

Anonymous said...

I would like to point out that the clear sealed baggie must be QUART sized. Please update the blog so passengers don't inadvertantly arrive at the airport with a gallon sized bag full of travel sized items only to be denied.

Anonymous said...

"If you find yourself at the checkpoint with a 6 ounce jar of expensive face cream..."

Doesn't TSA have a means of telling the difference between face cream and an explosive? Some sort of explosive trace detection, perhaps? Or maybe a canine?

Anonymous said...

Can you comment on the incident of the fake screener patting down women in a private screening room at the airport in San Francisco? How does TSA have authority over this case, given that investigations of public intoxication and sexual assault are not within TSA's purview? If what happened in the private screening room was sexual assault and/or illegal detention, how are TSA procedures in the private screening room not considered sexual assault and/or illegal detention as well?

From one article about the incident:

"...However, the case has largely gone hush-hush since the federal Transportation Security Administration, which oversees airport security, took over the investigation into how the breach happened."
--http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/matier-ross/article/SFO-s-alleged-fake-screener-is-a-high-powered-5628564.php

Anonymous said...

Who is screening the screeners at SFO?

Anonymous said...

Susan Richart said...
"When you spend your hard-earned money on beauty products that you really like, you certainly don’t want to have to be forced to toss them at the checkpoint,....."

Fixed it for you, Bob.

you always have options for your property, even if you do not like them they are options. i had a pocket knife one time. did not like what my options were but no one said that i had to throw it away. i have seen people ask for a supervisor if they are asked to throw something away. it appears that this is an option. why continue to spread false information?

Anonymous said...

Susan Richart said "don’t want to have to be forced to toss them at the checkpoint"

What force!?!

1) Know and follow the rules before you get to the checkpoint. Simple.

2) You have other options besides leaving them at the checkpoint (check them, hand them to somebody seeing you off etc...) TSA cannot "force" you to leave items at the checkpoint.

*Screeshot

@skywaymanaz said...

It would be a great incentive to get people to sign up for PreBribe . . . err PreCheck if some of the liquid restrictions would go away for members. West once confirmed to me in a post last year that you can test liquids, it just isn't practical to do it for everyone. The PreCheck literature says members can still be subject to random testing. So what is the problem with lifting this restriction for trusted travelers since the random testing capability exists and this group is already subject to random measures? When Pre was only available at the largest airports in the country retaining the restriction made sense since the return airport might not have Pre avail. Now that it is available at 118 airports the argument to keep the restriction for trusted travelers is becoming extremely weak.

Chris Boyce said...

"You can also ask to leave the checkpoint...

Ask? Really, now. Am I being detained?

GSOLTSO said...

Anon sez - "What is stop a person from continuing on their terminal? What does the traveler do with the excess?"

An individual departing the screening area for any reason would have to come back through screening in order to enter the terminal. If the excess can not be condensed into the correct size of bottle, the passenger can use an additional bottle of the correct size, as long as all of their 3-1-1 LAG fit into one quart sized bag. There are other options available as well, such as checking with the airline to see if the items can be placed in checked baggage (not always an option), return the item to their conveyance, give the item to someone not flying, or dispose of the item that is over-sized.

Anon sez - "Now, if the TSA could only figure out how to fix the weather problems we've been having lately causing so many delays."

Would that we could Anon, it would save tons of money, and cut down on the travel blues for many people that wind up with crazy travel plans or get cancelled!

Anon sez - "And then there are travelers like me who don't take beauty products. Wish I could say it was because I am just naturally gorgeous. But the truth is, I've reached an age where I'm beyond all help anyway! Plano TX"

Not taking them with you is always an option, but I doubt you are beyond help!

Susan sez - "Fixed it for you, Bob."

Not Bob for this post.

Anon sez - "I would like to point out that the clear sealed baggie must be QUART sized. Please update the blog so passengers don't inadvertantly arrive at the airport with a gallon sized bag full of travel sized items only to be denied."

We have posted that information many, many, many times in the past, and I also reiterated it above in this comment, thanks for the assist.

Chris sez - "Ask? Really, now. Am I being detained?"

No, but how would the TSO know that you wanted to leave the checkpoint area if you didn't ask them or notify them?

West
TSA Blog Team

SSSS for Some Reason said...

"... travel-size perfume bottle that meets 3-1-1 requirements. "

So I can fit seven or eight 3 ounce bottles into a quart zippy bag without too much trouble, and that is perfectly fine to bring through security.

I can not, however, bring one 20 ounce bottle through security.

Do you read your own rules before publishing them?

Anonymous said...

What independent, peer-reviewed scientific research supports the 3.4-1-1 liquid policy?

How many dangerous liquids has TSA found in the eight years since it imposed the 3.4-1-1 policy?

How many confiscated/surrendered liquids has TSA tested to see if they are dangerous? Were any?

Anonymous said...

Why is one 6 ounce beauty product not allowed but two 3 ounce beauty products are allowed? It doesn't make a lot of sense since it is the same amount of liquid.

Also, I noticed at the Orlando airport your signage said 3 oz when the limit is actually 3.4 oz or 100 ml. I'm just glad the employees didn't hassle me about my 100 ml size item since I read that Orlando has an issue recognizing Washington D.C. drivers licences as valid.

Anonymous said...

Hey West, you forgot to answer the question about why these potentially explosive liquids are being tossed into the nearest checkpoint trash bin.

Maybe it was an oversight.

Anonymous said...

It has been proven that liquid explosives are very easy to make and effective.

Bald-faced lie.

Will this comment be allowed to post? Doubtful.

Mike Toreno said...

Clerk West, rather than spend so much time planting comments, why not do some research and tell us the rules on medical liquids and what happens to clerks who deliberately violate the rules on medical liquids. Are they fired? What happened to the clerks that falsely imprisoned Stacey Armato? Were they fired?

And why DO clerks throw supposed liquid bombs into trash bins? Has any liquid thrown into trash bins by TSA clerks ever exploded?

Wintermute said...

Anonymous said...
"That TSOs toss any confiscated liquid items into the nearest trash bin and don't call in the bomb squad or hazardous materials teams shows the foolish of these policies. If liquids were really such an explosive risk, then why are they being tossed into the checkpoint trash bins?

Of course I fully expect this question to be ignored, as you and your co-workers never answer any hard-hitting questions."



Given 30 seconds of thought, this is very simple to answer.

It has been proven that liquid explosives are very easy to make and effective. TSA has three choices..
1) Allow ALL liquids into the checkpoint unscreened and run the risk of liquid bombs (inevitable) to enter the checkpoint
2) allow liquids into the checkpoint AFTER screening and create such a tremendious line while clearing liquids
3) ban all liquids.

The ligical choice that has the least negitive impact on the traveling public and insures the most safety is option 3.

This wasnt hard to figuer out.


Except you ignored the actual question, and are mistaken on how easily liquid explosives are to make. The real question is, if they are so dangerous, why do they get tossed into the waste bin right at the checkpoint which, because of the slow, invasive machines prone to false positives, would make a nice, soft, target? Because they are not easily made, and TSA knows this. Otherwise every bottle of water that appears at a checkpoint would have to be treated as a potential bomb.

Susan Richart said...

Thanks, RB, for pointing out that it was someone named Bessy who wrote this drivel.

Bessy must not know that courts have ruled that passengers can't leave the screening process once it has begun, so why is she advising travelers to "ask" if they may leave the checkpoint?

screen shot/DHS OIG statement

Anonymous said...

I continue to wait for some justification for active duty military being included in pre-check, but not retired military or holders of current DoD or LE background investigations. military retirees have at least 20 years documented service to this Nation, pretty much proving their lack of risk. both DoD and LE background investigations should reveal any risk factors. active duty military do not, necessarily, have a background check or any significant length of service. neither citizenship nor a background investigation is required to enlist in the military, in fact there are likely illegal immigrants serving. if it is really about safety, then why are potentially unscreened non-citizens allowed through? sounds like it is just pandering to an admirable group to get PR, not adjusting the rules to ease screening on those who present a lower likelihood of threat.
Let me be clear: pre-911 screening should be the norm. it is all that is required, now that cockpit doors have been reinforced and locked, and flight crews and passengers know that the rules have changed and passivity=death. however, if we are going to continue this massive waste of tax dollars on security theatre, at least have _some_ of the rules make sense.

Chris Boyce said...

"Chris sez - "Ask? Really, now. Am I being detained?"

No, but how would the TSO know that you wanted to leave the checkpoint area if you didn't ask them or notify them?"

Knock off the drivel, West. You knew full well I was challenging the use of the word "ask" if I can leave the checkpoint. If I want to decide to leave and return to landside, you can't detain me and you know it.

Anonymous said...

"2) You have other options besides leaving them at the checkpoint (check them, hand them to somebody seeing you off etc...) TSA cannot 'force' you to leave items at the checkpoint."

How practical is going back to the ticket desk to ask if you can check an item in a bag that has already been processed and sent on its way? What if you are traveling alone?

TSA is only paying lip service to the idea that there are options. If the options were practical, thousands and thousands of items confiscated by TSA would not be available at government surplus sales. Fun facts:

-- Pennsylvania's surplus store sold $500,000 in TSA-confiscated items in four years according to http://watchdog.org/98444/everything-must-go-state-surplus-tsa-property-up-for-grabs-at-pa-warehouse/. If a pocket knife is resold for $5, that's the equivalent of 100,000 pocket knives.

-- Arizona's surplus store at http://www.publicsurplus.com/sms/arizona,az/browse/home has an auction category called "Airport --> Confiscated."

-- According to http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2012/11/21/tsa-airport-seizures-create-new-market/aLX2aH4xCVuQsgY6i0p1mM/story.html, "TSA collects so many miniature multitools and Swiss Army knives that each model has its own bin at the [New Hampshire] surplus store, where they sell for $2."

--According to http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304373804577521210993059828, "...TSA sends truckloads of prohibited and left-behind items to state-run agencies set up to sell surplus government equipment." Per the same article, "In the first five months of this year, Texas collected about $259,000 at its storefront, most of it from selling TSA-donated items."

--The article at http://travel.usatoday.com/flights/story/2012-02-21/Loot-confiscated-by-TSA-turns-into-revenue-for-states/53195748/1 provides some history. "Because the TSA had trouble coping with the accumulation, with 10 tons of contraband piling up at Los Angeles International Airport alone, [the executive director of the National Association of State Agencies for Surplus Property] helped negotiate an agreement a decade ago with the federal government for states to take possession of the surrendered items."

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
Who is screening the screeners at SFO?

i believe that this airport is has screeners that are not federal employees. it is one of the airports that has a contractor. tsa has oversight over the private complany but the employees at the screening area are not federal employees.

Anonymous said...

when was the last change to the items that cannot be taken through a tsa area? was it 2006? 8 years ago? and how many items from this ban 8 years ago are being found on a daily basis? is this what are society has become? and then to sit and complain constantly about something that has been in place for 8 years? what does this say about our society as a whole? lazy?

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
"2) You have other options besides leaving them at the checkpoint (check them, hand them to somebody seeing you off etc...) TSA cannot 'force' you to leave items at the checkpoint."

How practical is going back to the ticket desk to ask if you can check an item in a bag that has already been processed and sent on its way? What if you are traveling alone?

TSA is only paying lip service to the idea that there are options. If the options were practical, thousands and thousands of items confiscated by TSA would not be available at government surplus sales. Fun facts:

-- Pennsylvania's surplus store sold $500,000 in TSA-confiscated items in four years according to http://watchdog.org/98444/everything-must-go-state-surplus-tsa-property-up-for-grabs-at-pa-warehouse/. If a pocket knife is resold for $5, that's the equivalent of 100,000 pocket knives.

-- Arizona's surplus store at http://www.publicsurplus.com/sms/arizona,az/browse/home has an auction category called "Airport --> Confiscated."

-- According to http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2012/11/21/tsa-airport-seizures-create-new-market/aLX2aH4xCVuQsgY6i0p1mM/story.html, "TSA collects so many miniature multitools and Swiss Army knives that each model has its own bin at the [New Hampshire] surplus store, where they sell for $2."

--According to http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304373804577521210993059828, "...TSA sends truckloads of prohibited and left-behind items to state-run agencies set up to sell surplus government equipment." Per the same article, "In the first five months of this year, Texas collected about $259,000 at its storefront, most of it from selling TSA-donated items."

--The article at http://travel.usatoday.com/flights/story/2012-02-21/Loot-confiscated-by-TSA-turns-into-revenue-for-states/53195748/1 provides some history. "Because the TSA had trouble coping with the accumulation, with 10 tons of contraband piling up at Los Angeles International Airport alone, [the executive director of the National Association of State Agencies for Surplus Property] helped negotiate an agreement a decade ago with the federal government for states to take possession of the surrendered items."

this says more about the passengers than it does about the tsa policy. how about taking the time to know what is in your bag when you travel and to be proactive about knowing the basic policies. there really have not been that many changes since tsa started and those that have changed happened many, many years ago.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
"That TSOs toss any confiscated liquid items into the nearest trash bin and don't call in the bomb squad or hazardous materials teams shows the foolish of these policies. If liquids were really such an explosive risk, then why are they being tossed into the checkpoint trash bins?

Of course I fully expect this question to be ignored, as you and your co-workers never answer any hard-hitting questions."



Given 30 seconds of thought, this is very simple to answer.

It has been proven that liquid explosives are very easy to make and effective. TSA has three choices..
1) Allow ALL liquids into the checkpoint unscreened and run the risk of liquid bombs (inevitable) to enter the checkpoint
2) allow liquids into the checkpoint AFTER screening and create such a tremendious line while clearing liquids
3) ban all liquids.

The ligical choice that has the least negitive impact on the traveling public and insures the most safety is option 3.

This wasnt hard to figuer out

i recall tsa banning all liquids in the begining of the ban, then it went to 3 oz then it went to 3.4 oz. it appears that tsa has attempted to make changes to their policy to make some accomodations.

Anonymous said...

The TSA employees who anonymously mock and deride flyers on this blog need to realize that many people rarely fly. They may not have flown in years. These people may not have visited this blog, because why would they? They know there was something on the news once or twice about shoes and liquids, but whatever. They'll deal with it at the airport.

Tell me, TSAnonymous, is there any mode of transportation you haven't ridden or haven't ridden in years? Are you at this moment fully up on all of the rules for this mode of transportation? Do you believe everyone always does extensive research every time they want to do something as simple as get on a mode of mass transportation?

As someone who has done some traveling in and out of the US, I have done a bit of research for how and where I'm traveling, but saw no reason to find every press release and every scrap of information stated about transportation modes for every place I've visited. I'll check to see if there are schedule, cost, or route changes. Beyond that, I'm not anticipating that things have gotten so out of hand and that a government agency has gotten so out of control as to confiscate billions of dollars in private property over the past ten years.

Until I learned about the TSA.

In other words, not everyone who shows up at your screening area is going to be fully informed as to what they have to do. It is YOUR JOB to help that person get through the screening experience with as little personal invasion, groping, and loss of property as possible, while still completing the invasive and confiscating procedures of your employer.

Anonymous said...

just becasue someone sticks up for the tsa does not mean that they work for them. how about being a person that travels all the time and has to deal with the people that dont know what they are doing in front of me. i can understand your point about people not regularly flying however as a rational person i see the numerous amounts of signs at the screening areas that are explaining the process and the tsa people that are there to help people get through. this has nothing to do with the internet or blog or apps, etc. americans do not take responsibility for themselves and constantly blame everyone else. this society needs to step up and take some responsibility for itself and stop blaming everyone else.

Anonymous said...

To the "Frequent Flyer" TSApologist, the signage at TSA screening areas is small, poorly written, poorly placed, and would be unintelligible for anyone who does not read English or is visually impaired.

Being that you are a "frequent flyer," you may visit several airports and are able to have a better understanding of where to look and what to look for.

Infrequent flyers, you know, the ones who are always in your way, wouldn't be as able to pick up on the hidden, small, bad writing and discern exactly what it says.

I haven't found the screeners at the screening areas to always be very helpful for infrequent travelers. Instead, they just repeat the same words over and over and over again, occasionally getting louder and louder, with the ridiculous view that if you yell, someone who does not speak English will suddenly understand you. Or if you do speak English, but aren't really understanding the process, saying the same thing over and over again in the exact same words does not help with comprehension.

Working with the public can be trying or rewarding, depending upon the training you get and the desire to help that you bring. I see very little of either at a screening area for any citizen or visitor wanting to travel in the US.

By the way, "frequent flyer" TSApologist, are you American? You speak of Americans as if you are not one of us.

Anonymous said...

"Anonymous said...
"2) You have other options besides leaving them at the checkpoint (check them, hand them to somebody seeing you off etc...) TSA cannot 'force' you to leave items at the checkpoint."

How practical is going back to the ticket desk to ask if you can check an item in a bag that has already been processed and sent on its way? What if you are traveling alone?

TSA is only paying lip service to the idea that there are options. If the options were practical, thousands and thousands of items confiscated by TSA would not be available at government surplus sales."
-------------------
No. If people can't realize that an 8 YEAR OLD rule is in place, they can simply read the signs at the Checkpoint.
Of course that's not withstanding the literally hundreds (if not thousands by now) of newspaper stories, radio stories, television news stories, blog posts, internet posts, word of mouth, airline notifications, etc, etc, etc.

Sorry, if this was a two day old traffic law, you can bet people would know about it.
Americans have a sense of entitlement. I've spoken to many people that say "Well, I play the odds. Maybe I'll get through with it."
And regardless of how bloggers want to twist it, those options do exist - Take it outside the checkpoint and do whatever you want with it or dispose of it at the checkpoint. Plain and simple. And dont even try to get your airline to put it in your checked bag regardless of what TSA says. This is NOT a viable option. With very, very, very few exceptions, once you hand your bag to the airline, they are NOT going to try to pull it out of the system to get it back so you can put your oversize liquids in it.
If YOU decide that the $20 worth of hair products you are carrying is worth missing your flight for, that's your choice.
Of course, we could do what they do in Eurpope - take it out of the bag, hand you back the bag minus item and say "Have a good day".
If you DECIDE to go through an airport with a prohibited item and lose it, that's on you. It's called personal responsibility. Something Americans are sadly lacking as a society.

Anonymous said...

No. If people can't realize that an 8 YEAR OLD rule is in place, they can simply read the signs at the Checkpoint.Of course that's not withstanding the literally hundreds (if not thousands by now) of newspaper stories, radio stories, television news stories, blog posts, internet posts, word of mouth, airline notifications, etc, etc, etc.Sorry, if this was a two day old traffic law, you can bet people would know about it.Americans have a sense of entitlement. I've spoken to many people that say "Well, I play the odds. Maybe I'll get through with it."And regardless of how bloggers want to twist it, those options do exist - Take it outside the checkpoint and do whatever you want with it or dispose of it at the checkpoint. Plain and simple. And dont even try to get your airline to put it in your checked bag regardless of what TSA says. This is NOT a viable option. With very, very, very few exceptions, once you hand your bag to the airline, they are NOT going to try to pull it out of the system to get it back so you can put your oversize liquids in it.If YOU decide that the $20 worth of hair products you are carrying is worth missing your flight for, that's your choice.Of course, we could do what they do in Eurpope - take it out of the bag, hand you back the bag minus item and say "Have a good day".If you DECIDE to go through an airport with a prohibited item and lose it, that's on you. It's called personal responsibility. Something Americans are sadly lacking as a society.July 26, 2014 at 12:59 PM
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The law says that once a person enters the screening process that that they must complete the screening process. That requirement in not compatable with being able to leave the checkpoint to take care of an item, like harmless water, that can't go through screening.

Seems TSA is talking out of both sides of its mouth.

RB said...

A poster complains that travelers should know all of TSA rules but fails to note that TSA has failed to ever publish a concise works of TSA rules travelers must comply with.

TSA is the party at fault in this matter.